Undergraduate 2020-2021

Course Designations

Course designation information can be found at 'Course Designation Policy'


AFS 100 Introduction to Africana Studies

Reviews the emergence of Africana Studies as an interdisciplinary field and also presents a rudimentary panorama of African American history. Methodological questions and intellectual debates within the field are introduced.
3

Course Attribute

LC4-History and LC8-US Multicultural Studies and GT History

AFS 101 Development of Black Identity

Addresses social conditions that lead to formation of black identity in America. Of special interest are Negro-to-Black conversion experience, concept of racism, subordination and role of Afro-American culture.
3

Course Attribute

LC4-History and LC8-US Multicultural Studies and GT History

AFS 102 The Black Woman in America

Review the contributions of African American women historically in this country in the areas of social and political struggle, education, business, science and sports.
3

AFS 104 Survey of Africa

Explores the geography, culture, philosophy, history, art, politics, economics, women and literature of Africa.
3

AFS 201 African American History I

A survey of the black experience from the African homeland to initial capture, enslavement and emancipation – 1619 - 1865.
3

Course Attribute

LC4-History and GT History

AFS 202 African American History II

Examines the lives of African Americans from emancipation to the present.
3

Course Attribute

LC4-History and GT History

AFS 205 Survey of African American Literature

Literature by people of African descent receives selective attention: African, Latin American, Caribbean, African American works are explored. Genres: political tract, novel, essay, autobiography, folk literature considered at various historical junctures.
3

Course Attribute

LC3b-Literature & Humanities and GT Literature

AFS 240 Dynamics of Racism

Racism, its social connection to human physical difference (i.e. race) studied. References made to African/European relations, development of racist thought, major sociological models used in United States, re: race relations.
3

AFS 303 Blacks in the American West

A guided exploration into the lives and accomplishments of African Americans in the western United States. The periods concentrated on will be from the early contact through the 21st century.
3

AFS 310 African Americans and U.S. Education

This course introduces students to the history of African American diverse educational experiences and accomplishments within the U.S. educational system. Students will be able to articulate the historical, economical, social and political precedents when examining contemporary educational issues and policy.
3

AFS 340 The Black Family

A social system approach to the study of the African American family, dynamics of family relationships and effects of social, political and economic institutions on black family life.
3

AFS 360 Routes of Black Music

The historical, thematic and stylistic development of black music from ancient Africa to the present.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: AFS 360 and MUS 363

AFS 386 Political Economy of Modern Africa

Comparison of various nationalist movements of the African Continent that led to liberation and independence.
3

AFS 395 Aspects of the African-American Experience

Topics include Afro-American cultures, black psychology and black media. .
3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

AFS 396 African and African American World Views

African and African American world views. A study of the philosophy of people of African descent from ancient Africa to the New World.
3

AFS 399 Community Study Project

Supervised field work on a community-based project related to issues in Africana Studies. Paper analyzing experience required.

1-4

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 4 credit hours

AFS 404 History of Blacks in Film

This course will address issues surrounding the depiction of African Americans and other Blacks in cinema. Students will be expected to evaluate African American movie portrayals in both historical and social contexts.
3

AFS 415 Black Psychology

Examines Psychological issues such as African world views, social constructivism, stages of Black identity development, the impact of racism on Black psychology, mental health, trauma, abuse, and addiction issues.
3

AFS 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 4

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

AFS 450 African American History, 1896-Present

A critical examination of African American history from the pivotal 1896 Homer Plessy U.S. Supreme Court decision to the present.

3

AFS 456 The Black Church and Religious Traditions

Investigates the role of the Black Church in the development of the African American family, philosophy and leadership style from slavery to the present.
3

AFS 490 Seminar in Africana Studies

Preparation for advanced reading and research in Africana Studies. Topics address theories, research methodology and issues of current interest in Africana Studies research. Consultation required on research project chosen by student.
3

Prerequisites

(AFS 100 and AFS 104 and AFS 201 and AFS 202 with a minimum grade of D-)

ANT 100 Introduction to Anthropology

An introduction to archaeology, physical and cultural anthropology and linguistics, emphasizing the comparative approach and an evolutionary perspective.
3

Course Attribute

LC5c-Hum Behav & Social Sys

ANT 110 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

A course in the concept of culture, how cultural processes work, variation in cultural practices, the method of crosscultural comparison and culture change.
3

Course Attribute

LC5c-Hum Behav & Social Sys and LC7-International Studies and GT Human Behavior & Soc Sys

ANT 120 World Archaeology

A broad background in prehistoric archaeology reviewing important sites around the world. Emphasis will be on anthropological interpretation of archaeological materials, the evolution of past cultures and cultural processes.
3

Course Attribute

LC5c-Hum Behav & Social Sys and GT Human Behavior & Soc Sys

ANT 130 Introduction to Biological Anthropology

This is a course in evolutionary theory, primate biology, human paleontology, and human adaptation. It focuses on the evolution of humans and the impact of culture on our evolutionary biology.
3

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and GT Physical & Life Sciences

ANT 212 North American Indians

Survey the culture areas of Native American groups in North America, with a focus on the United States.
3

Course Attribute

LC5c-Hum Behav & Social Sys and LC8-US Multicultural Studies and GT Human Behavior & Soc Sys

ANT 233 Anthropological Linguistics

Anthropological Linguistics, also called "ethnolinguistics," is the study of human communication that looks at the origin and evolution of language. This course examines the relationship between language, culture and cognition.
3

ANT 245 Introduction to Ethnomusicology

Definition, history, and scope of Ethnomusicology; its role in the study of human behavior and cultures, and its relationship with musicology, anthropology, history, culture, religion, and humanities. Survey of functional music in different socio-cultural settings. Exploration of ethnomusicological theories, research, and fieldwork study.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ANT 245 and MUS 245

Course Attribute

LC5c-Hum Behav & Social Sys and LC7-International Studies

ANT 270 Professional Development

Explore career options for anthropology majors, and practice research and professional development skills.
3

ANT 292 Ideas in Conflict

An examination of the cultural, political and economic ideologies that gave rise to major conflicts of the 20th century.

3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ANT 292 and MIND 292

ANT 296 Study Abroad Experience

Engage, through experiential learning, travel, and cultural immersion abroad, in gaining better understanding of other countries' cultures and cultural heritages and appreciation of the diversity and richness of human societies. S/U Graded.
3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course may be repeated 3 times

ANT 300 Applied Anthropology

Examine the variety of tools used in applied anthropology towards heritage resource management and Social Impact Assessment (SIA).
3

Prerequisites

(ANT 100 or ANT 110 with a minimum grade of D-)

ANT 313 Anthropology of Globalization

Examine transnationalism from an anthropological perspective, focusing on interactions between global and local forces and the implications of globalization and development for people's everyday lives in sites around the world.
3

Prerequisites

(ANT 100 or ANT 110 with a minimum grade of D-)

ANT 314 Anthropology of Sex and Gender Diversity

Study biologically and culturally determined gender role differences by comparing sex-related behavior in a variety of cultures.
3

ANT 315 Life History and Culture

A course in ethnographic writing focusing on methods of life history/life cycle research and analysis. Students will learn cultural interviewing techniques and will complete a written life history.
3

ANT 316 Global Conflict and Gender

This course uses multiple theoretical perspectives to provide a cultural analysis of conflict and war and their gendered effects on women, men, and other genders across the globe.

3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ANT 316 and GNDR 316

ANT 317 Contemporary Native American Issues

Deals with the cultural, historical, social, political and legal analysis of the status of contemporary American Indians in the United States.
3

ANT 320 Archaeological Research Methods

Review field methods and laboratory techniques utilized in prehistoric archaeology. Topics include locational analysis, stratigraphy, typological analysis, dating techniques and research publication.
3

Prerequisites

(ANT 100 or ANT 120 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ANT 321 Archaeology of North America

Study selected prehistoric American Indian cultures with an anthropological focus. This course covers the time from the peopling of the New World to European discovery.
3

Prerequisites

(ANT 100 or ANT 120 with a minimum grade of D-)

ANT 325 Fieldwork in Archaeology

Required laboratory arranged. Introduction to archaeological field methods through participation in an archaeology field experience for four weeks during the summer.
4

Prerequisites

(ANT 100 or ANT 120 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Fee

Participation Fee Required

ANT 328 Public Archaeology

Covers cultural resource management, heritage law, outreach and education, stewardship of cultural heritage, research aimed at helping communities and solving practical problems, and building and maintaining relationships with the public.
3

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite ANT 120 with a minimum grade of D-

ANT 330 Forensic Anthropology

Required laboratory arranged. A course in human osteology emphasizing skeletal anatomy and the identification of age, sex, stature, pathology and race in skeletal material. Archaeological, paleontological and forensic applications will be presented.
3

Prerequisites

(ANT 120 or ANT 130 or CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of D-)

ANT 331 Anthropology and Contemporary Human Problems

Anthropological perspectives and methods are used to critically examine the assumptions and actions underlying social and environmental contemporary human problems as well as those involved in efforts to address them.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ANT 331 and ENST 331

ANT 332 Modern Human Variation

This course explores biocultural human variation and human adaptations to their cultural and physical environments. We discuss which human variations result from genes, culture, and/or environment.
3

Prerequisites

(ANT 120 or BIO 100 or BIO 110 with a minimum grade of D-)

ANT 333 Anthropology of Religion

Provides a framework for understanding anthropological approaches to the study of belief systems as well as the nature of faith and religious experiences in some of the world's religions.
3

Prerequisites

(ANT 100 or ANT 110 with a minimum grade of D-)

ANT 335 Primate Behavior

This course examines behavior among living primates in order to make inferences about human and hominim behaviors.
3

ANT 338 World Rebuilding (Paleoecology)

An introduction to how scientists reconstruct the world’s ancient habitats through paleoecology (studying fossil organisms and their environment). Covers ecological/evolutionary principles,  multiple methods for reconstructing ancient environments, and data interpretation/synthesis/evaluation.

3

Prerequisites

(ANT 130 or BIO 110 with a minimum grade of D-)

ANT 340 Quantitative Methods for Anthropology

Learn skills of measuring and analyzing information on human biological variability. Topics include the analysis of physique, habitual activity analysis, health screening and statistical techniques for describing samples of data.
3

ANT 350 Field Methods in Cultural Anthropology

Introduction to fieldwork methods in cultural anthropology. Study ethnographic techniques through first-hand investigation of other cultures.
3

Prerequisites

(ANT 100 or ANT 110 with a minimum grade of D-)

ANT 355 Medical Anthropology

The study of human health as a result of relationships within a population, between neighboring populations and among the life forms and physical components of a habitat.
3

ANT 395 Topics in Anthropology

Study of a theme or geographic area in cultural, biological, archaeological, or linguistic anthropology.
3

Prerequisites

(ANT 100 or ANT 110 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 18 credit hours

ANT 408 Workshop in Anthropology

Topics in practicing anthropology. Group experiences in working on selected problems in anthropology.
3-12

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

ANT 421 Prehistoric Europe

This course reviews the prehistory of Europe through archaeological evidence. Our coverage ranges from the arrival of archaic humans ca. 800,000 BP to the expansion of the Roman Empire around 2000 BP.
3

Prerequisites

(ANT 120 or ANT 320 with a minimum grade of D-)

ANT 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 4

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

ANT 430 Human Evolutionary Anatomy

A detailed study of the structure and functions of the human musculoskeletal system in a comparative and evolutionary perspective.
3

Prerequisites

(ANT 100 or ANT 120 or ANT 130 or BIO 110 with a minimum grade of D-)

ANT 470 Seminar in Anthropology

A seminar exploring diverse topics surrounding the question of defining human nature.
3

Prerequisites

(ANT 100 or ANT 110 or ANT 130 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

ANT 492 Internship

Anthropological field experiences in ethnology, museology, education, government or politics.
1-12

Prerequisites

9.0 Credit Hours in ANT

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 12 credit hours

APCE 385 Practicum in Community Engagement: Campus Connections

Campus Connections is a service-learning course where students mentor at-risk youth. Students work with mentees in a group setting to provide academic support, social skill development, goal setting, and wellness programming.
3

Course Attribute

Community Engaged Learning

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 3 times

Course Fee

Participation Fee Required

APCE 450 Facilitating Career Development (NCDA)

Study theory and methods of the career facilitation process, become familiar with formal and informal career assessment instruments, and learn about legal and ethical issues related to career facilitation services.
3

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

ART 171 Introduction to Visual Communication Design

Principles and practices in applying computer graphics in art. General computer orientation: hardware/software configuration, peripherals. Students will create electronically generated art graphics. No experience in computer science is required.
3

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 177 Creative Photography

This course is designed for students who are not art majors/ minors, but have interest in photography as a creative medium. Basic Camera types and functions, creative photographic techniques, photography apps, software and visual literacy will be introduced.
3

Major/Minor Restriction

Exclude Art & Design Major(s)

ART 181 Ancient Art History

This is a general survey class of western and Non-western art of Ancient cultures from Paleolithic art to the Byzantine Empire. The emphasis of this survey is on the major movements and civilizations, methods of analysis, historical and cultural context.
3

Course Attribute

LC3a-Arts and GT Arts

ART 182 Medieval to Rococo Art History

This is a general survey class of Western and Non-western art from Early Medieval to the Baroque Art. The emphasis of this survey is on the major movements and Civilizations, methods of analysis, historical and cultural context.
3

Course Attribute

LC3a-Arts and GT Arts

ART 183 2D Design

Elements and principles of art. Exploration of the elements of line, shape and color in two-dimensional and three-dimensional design and drawing projects. Experiences in conceptualization and visual problem solving.
3

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 184 3D Design

Exploration of the elements of line, shape, color, value, space and texture in 3D spatial design. Experiences with materials, methods, conceptualization, ideation, visual problem solving and evaluation.
3

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 185 Neoclassic to Modern Art History

A general survey class of Western and Non-western art from Neo-classical Art to Contemporary Art of the 21st Century. The emphasis of this survey is on the major movements and civilizations, methods of analysis, historical and cultural context.
3

Course Attribute

LC3a-Arts and GT Arts

ART 190 Art Appreciation

Introduction to further enhance an understanding and appreciation of the functional and expressive nature of architecture, painting, sculpture and the applied arts.
3

Major/Minor Restriction

Exclude Visual Arts (and) Art & Design Major(s)

Course Attribute

LC3a-Arts and GT Arts

ART 210 Introduction to Ceramics

This course is an introduction to the use of clay. The student will learn techniques used in wheel throwing and hand building and safe handling of ceramics chemistry and equipment.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Art & Design (and) Arts Entrepreneurship Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 221 Fiber Design I

A studio course involving several fiber construction processes and fabric surface treatments in two or three dimensions.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 223 Weaving

Introduction to the fundamentals of loom weaving as an art form, emphasizing applied design problems.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 224 Research and Writing in the Visual Arts

Introduction to research, writing, and methods in art history.
3

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 231 Painting I

Fundamentals of painting. Materials and techniques in basic procedures of studio painting.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 234 Drawing I

Deal in depth with concepts, techniques and materials. Problem areas include composition, content, technical concerns, use of color and a range of material use from traditional to contemporary alternatives.
3

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 237 Introduction to Digital Media

Current trends in technology are discussed through exploration of various digital media. Knowledge related to art, page layout, time and space related media is stimulated through building a portfolio.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 248 Introduction to Art Education/Art for the Exceptional Child

Assigned placements in K-12 classrooms. An overview of the characteristics, needs, and instructional adaptations suitable for teaching visual arts to the exceptional learner.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-) and (EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Attribute

Community Engaged Learning

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 250 Introduction to Printmaking

The course focuses on basic techniques of Intaglio and Relief Printmaking, including dry point and monotype techniques in Intaglio, and linoleum cut and wood cut in Relief Printmaking.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Art & Design Major(s)/Minor(s)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 261 Introduction to Sculpture

Introduction to materials, processes and concepts fundamental to making sculpture.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 265 Metalsmithing

Introduction to materials, processes and concepts basic to making jewelry.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 268 Introduction to Game Design

This course introduces game design, theory and history. Students will learn about the various skills/knowledge important to the field.
3

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 269 Introduction to Web Design

This course covers industry-standard design guidelines and its application to planning, design and development of web pages.
3

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 270 Graphic Design I

This survey course introduces students to graphic design as a conceptual and visual discipline. Emphasis is placed on creative problem solving through a variety of exercises and projects using traditional and digital media.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 171 and ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 271 Introduction to Photography

This course is the beginning level study of digital photography. Learn camera operation, electronic image editing and techniques to improve one's skill as a photographer. This course also emphasizes conceptualization, aesthetic sensitivity and appreciation of the medium as the democratic vehicle for communication.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Art & Design Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 275 Introduction to Motion Graphics

This course covers establishing motion graphics fundamentals including visual rhythm, kinetic typography, continuity, multi-planar effects and other intermediate industry techniques.
3

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 276 Introduction to Page Layout

This course covers creating new documents, importing files, working with text, alignment tools, and managing colors to produce high quality documents for print and on-screen delivery.
3

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 277 Introduction to Raster-Graphics

This course explores fundamental techniques in raster-graphics software. Students will use raster tools, layers multiple images and masks in order to construct and modify digital images.
3

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 278 Introduction to Vector-Graphics

This course explores fundamental techniques in vector-graphics software. Students will use vector tools, text and image tracing in order to create vector artwork for web, video and print.
3

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 279 Introduction to Video

This course addresses the theory and practice of film/video production. Students gain experience and understanding of camera operation, audio control, basic directing, lighting, editing and effects.
3

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 290 Visual Problem Solving

Explore concepts of visual thinking, communication and the meaning of visual images as icons, signs and symbols. Analyze images and art objects. Learn and apply strategies for visual problem solving.
3

Course Attribute

LC3a-Arts and GT Arts

ART 301 The Working Artist: Preparation

This course prepares the visual art student for a career as a commercial or working fine artist. Areas to be researched include identity and presentation, an introduction to professional structures, and innovative pathways for the professional artist. Students will examine their professional goals, and how to navigate the creative process and the unique challenges of being a professional artist.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

ART 308 Workshop in Art

Arts workshops are for the study of specialized areas in art, art education, art history, graphic arts and related fields. Specific workshop content is determined by subtitle.
1- 4

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 314 Wheel Throwing

In this course students will develop techniques used in forming clay with the potters wheel. Course concentrates on form and function. Students will also operate the ceramics lab and equipment.
3

Prerequisites

ART 210 with a minimum grade of D-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Arts Entrepreneurship (and) Art & Design Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 315 Ceramic Design

In this course students will develop techniques used in forming clay including coil, slab, slip casting and other mold making techniques. Students will also operate the ceramics lab and equipment.
3

Prerequisites

ART 210 with a minimum grade of D-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Art & Design (and) Arts Entrepreneurship Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 321 Fiber Design II

Continue the study and exploration of fiber construction and fabric surface treatments with emphasis on their design applications.
3

Prerequisites

ART 221 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 331 Painting II

Development of individual expression in studio painting and development of mastery of the mediums.
3

Prerequisites

ART 231 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 333 Life Drawing

Fundamentals of life drawing emphasizing proportions, anatomy and aesthetic relationships.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 338 Digital Illustration and Storytelling

The course is designed to introduce techniques used for concept visualization as a cross-disciplinary, research-based environment. Connections between data presentation in digital media will be discussed.
3

Prerequisites

ART 237 with a minimum grade of D-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Art & Design Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 345 Clinical Experiences I: K-12 Art

Gain practical experience in the classroom with variety of materials, art subject matter and with varying age groups. Requires classroom observation and participation with weekly seminar.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-) and (EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Art & Design Major(s)/Minor(s)

ART 353 Intaglio Printmaking

The course focuses on the following media: soft ground, hard ground, aquatint, feather biting, and spit biting. Innovative solutions to technical problems, development of personal images, and fundamental skills are emphasized.
3

Prerequisites

ART 250 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 356 Monotypes

Investigation in techniques of creating monotypes and monoprints (one-of-a-kind printed images). Individual imagery and technical development are emphasized.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 358 Relief Printmaking

The course focuses on media in Relief Printmaking: Linocut, Wood Cut, Reduction Woodcut, Callographs, and Engraving. Printed with Oil-based and Water-based inks, on and off-press printing will be investigated.
3

Prerequisites

ART 250 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 362 Sculpture: Casting

Problems in specific casting processes in sculpture, including intermediate level bronze, aluminum metal casting, and alternative non-metal casting materials and techniques. Non-traditional approaches to casting will also be covered.
3

Prerequisites

ART 261 with a minimum grade of D-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Art & Design Major(s)/Minor(s)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 363 Sculpture: Fabrication

Problems in fabrication in sculpture, including: steel, aluminum, wood, and plastics. Processes examined include: intermediate level MIG welding, brazing, other types of connections and wood joinery.
3

Prerequisites

ART 261 with a minimum grade of D-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Art & Design Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 367 Introduction to Digital Fabrication

This class will introduce the methods and practices of digital fabrication to produce creative works in studio and/or design. Learn the basics of 3D modeling and computer-aided manufacturing to produce functional and conceptual work that suit your artistic interests.
3

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 368 Game Design II

This course utilizes the tools and techniques required to create the components of game design including: narrative structure, character development, design and storyboarding.
3

Prerequisites

ART 268 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 369 Game Design III

This course covers advanced techniques for creating artistic games utilizing various digital media. Collaborative production will involve code, video and sound, focusing on game production and prototyping.
3

Prerequisites

ART 368 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 370 Graphic Design II

The continued study of the conceptual and applied aspects of graphic design. Projects and exercises challenge students to better understand and utilize design strategies, theories and systems.
3

Prerequisites

ART 270 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 374 Photography: Black & White Film

This course covers 35mm and large format black and white film photography. Students also address concepts and aesthetics of documentary and editorial photography.
3

Prerequisites

ART 271 with a minimum grade of D-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Art & Design Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 375 Photography: Digital Capture

Students will learn a variety of digital and photographic techniques in order to come up with creative solutions to conceptual and aesthetic challenges.
3

Prerequisites

ART 271 with a minimum grade of D-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Art & Design Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 376 Typography

Students explore the theoretical, expressive and applied use of typography as an integral part of visual communication. Coursework materials cover the application of typographic formats and systems, along with the history of conventional and emerging design theories.
3

Prerequisites

ART 270 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Senior and Junior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 377 Photography: Studio Lighting

This course covers advanced set, product and people lighting skills with projects that are designed to provide the student with real-world style assignments.
3

Prerequisites

ART 271 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Sophomore and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 378 Photography: Alternative Processes

This course explores non-traditional methods of photographic equipment, processes, techniques and delivery.
3

Prerequisites

ART 271 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 401 The Working Artist: Practicum

This course provides the visual art student with practical experience toward the goal of becoming a commercial or working fine artist. Areas of research include: developing an identity, website development, professional portfolio development, legal structures, copyright and intellectual property laws, marketing and advertising, and networking through professional/group associations.
3

Prerequisites

ART 301 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Senior

ART 410 Advanced Ceramics

This course is an advanced exploration of clay. Students will be given the freedom to work with both wheel throwing and hand building techniques to complete a series of challenging assignments.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 314 or ART 315 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Art & Design (and) Arts Entrepreneurship Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 415 Ceramic Studio

Individualized or specialized study on specific topics in ceramics.
1- 3

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 422 Directed Studies in Art

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 4

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 423 Weaving

Continue the study of loom weaving, particularly loom-controlled techniques.
3

Prerequisites

ART 223 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 425 Fibers Studio

Individualized or specialized study on specific topics in fibers.
1-3

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 426 Introduction to Museum Studies

Introduction to the historical/philosophical nature of museums in addition to current issues within the field, controversial topics, and the ever-evolving role of museums within society.
3

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 428 Museum Leadership

Students will learn about the history, philosophy, and current issues of Museum Leadership and arts administration.
3

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 431 Painting III

Continued development of individual expression and mastery of the medium. Emphasis on appropriate use of medium toward creative ends.
3

Prerequisites

ART 331 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 432 Advanced Painting

Advanced Development of individual expression and mastery of the medium. Emphasis on developing a cohesive body of work.
3

Prerequisites

ART 431 with a minimum grade of D-

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 433 Advanced Drawing

Individualized or specialized study on specific topics in drawing. Emphasis on exploration and development of ambitious, original approaches to drawing.
3

Prerequisites

ART 434 with a minimum grade of D-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Art & Design Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 434 Drawing II

Designed to encourage exploration of a broad variety of sources for drawing images, drawing concepts and thematic interpretation and expression. Designed for advanced drawing students.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 435 Drawing Studio

Individualized or specialized study on specific topics in drawing.
1- 3

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 436 Painting Studio

Individualized or specialized study on specific topics in painting.
1- 3

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 437 Computer Art

Principles and practices for computer application in the visual arts. Create art projects and gain knowledge of trends in computer graphics, digital technology and hardware/software configuration.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 and ART 237 with a minimum grade of D-)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 439 Computer Graphics Studio

Individualized or specialized study on specific topics related to computer graphics.
1- 3

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 440 Foundations of Art Education

An in-depth study of the field of art education and pre-professional related areas including: learning theory, aesthetics and psychology.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-) and (EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 441 Cultural Studies in the K-12 Curriculum

The course examines the teaching of art based on local and global cultural contexts including past traditions and current issues. The course includes art making experiences in the community.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 with a minimum grade of D) and (ART 182 with a minimum grade of D) and (ART 183 with a minimum grade of D-) and (ART 184 with a minimum grade of D-) and (ART 234 with a minimumgrade of D-)

Course Attribute

Community Engaged Learning

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 442 Curriculum and Instruction in Art: Studio Strategies

Study curriculum development and art learning activities appropriate for instruction in elementary and secondary art education.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-) and (EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Course Attribute

Community Engaged Learning

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 444 Methods of Teaching Art in the Elementary School

The class introduces elements of the visual arts and aesthetics that are applicable to children's learning in the elementary classroom.
1

Prerequisites

(GPA-2.75) and (EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 445 Clinical Experiences II: K-12 Art

Gain practical experience in the classroom with variety of materials, subject matter and with varying age groups. Requires observation in public school visual arts classrooms, participation in a variety of classroom experiences including preparing, teaching and assessing a visual arts unit and participation with weekly seminar.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 345 with a minimum grade of D-) and (EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Art & Design Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

ART 447 Multimedia in the Arts-Methods and Materials

Students investigate thematic interpretation of ideas and express them in a variety of systems. Through conceptual thought & formatting, students will explore an integration of 2D/3D projects.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Art & Design (and) Visual Arts Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

ART 449 Current Issues in Art

A study of cultural, social, philosophical, and theoretical issues in the arts. The course includes discussion of educational, museum, gallery and visual culture contexts including studio and post-studio practices.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 185 with a minimum grade of D-)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 452 Advanced Printmaking

The course focuses on linocut, reduction woodcut, callographs, and engraving in Relief and in Intaglio on soft ground, hard ground, aquatint, feather biting. Development of personal images are emphasized.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 353 and ART 358 with a minimum grade of D-)

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 455 Printmaking Studio

Individualized or specialized study on specific topic in printmaking.
1- 3

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 460 Sculpture Studio

Self-directed studies in selected sculptural modes or processes.
1- 3

Prerequisites

ART 361 with a minimum grade of D-

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 462 Advanced Sculpture

Instruction in advanced skills, techniques and concepts in sculpture at the undergraduate level. Emphasis on developing a coherent body of work.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 362 or ART 363 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Art & Design Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 464 Jewelry Studio

Individualized or specialized study on specific topic in jewelry.
1- 3

Prerequisites

ART 265 with a minimum grade of D-

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 465 Advanced Metalsmithing

Extension of increasingly skilled and sophisticated techniques/processes in jewelry and metalwork.
3

Prerequisites

ART 265 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 466 Visual Arts Student Teaching Seminar

This seminar provides persons actively involved in the student teaching program in Visual Arts with a support system and pertinent information to assist them during their field experience.
1

Prerequisites

(EDFE 130 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Corequisites

EDFE 444

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Art & Design Major(s)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 467 Advanced Digital Fabrication

This class will re-enforce the methods and practices of digital fabrication learned in Introduction to Digital Fabrication to produce creative works in studio and/or design. 3D modeling and computer-aided manufacturing will be utilized to produce functional and conceptual work at a more advanced level.
3

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 468 Game Design IV

This course familiarizes students with advanced techniques used for creating artistic games with the use of various digital media. Collaborative production will involve code, video and sound, focusing on game production and prototyping.
3

Prerequisites

ART 369 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 469 Interactive Design

This course concentrates on the design, development, implementation of effective web and interactive media applications. Projects emphasize the principles of graphic design, interactivity and usability.
3

Prerequisites

ART 270 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 470 Narrative Design

Advanced level graphic design course with an emphasis on narrative, multi-page and sequential design. Projects utilize advanced typographic and organizational systems using traditional and digital processes and media.
3

Prerequisites

ART 376 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 471 Computer Graphics

Exploration of computer graphics discipline by solving problems in computer based communication and visualization of ideas and processes across various disciplines. Presentation of interdisciplinary concepts as 2-D and 3-D objects.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 181 and ART 182 and ART 183 and ART 184 and ART 234 and ART 237 with a minimum grade of D-)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 472 Photography Studio

Individualized or specialized study in photography.
1- 3

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 473 Brand Identity Design

Advanced studio course focusing on the visual expression of branding and identity systems. Students use contemporary design analysis, research and creative strategy techniques, develop comprehensive branding and marketing campaigns, and execute quality presentations.
3

Prerequisites

ART 376 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 474 Graphic Studio

Individualized or specialized study on specific topics in graphics.
1- 3

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 476 Advanced Black and White Photography

Learn advanced concepts and practices of black and white film photography. Techniques also include controlling a large format camera, close-up/macro photography, processing sheet film, calibrating the film/paper system for the individual, printing on fiber based paper and toning prints.
3

Prerequisites

ART 274 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 479 Senior Project

The course focuses on the completion of a self initiated senior project and preparation of a professional portfolio. Students research and prepare capstone projects, and prepare a cohesive body of work for graduation.
3

Prerequisites

(ART 376 and Concurrent Prerequisite ART 469 and Concurrent Prerequisite ART 470 and Concurrent Prerequisite ART 473 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 481 Advanced Photography

This course provides the student with the opportunity to undertake a specialized study of a photographic process, technique or topic.
3

Prerequisites

ART 271 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 482 Arts of Indigenous People

Study the history and arts of Africa, South Seas and Mesoamerica.
3

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 484 Asian Art History

Students will learn about the arts traditions of East Asia and the aesthetic underpinnings of traditional East Asian culture.
3

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 486 Renaissance Art

Study in detail the humanistic aspects of the renaissance art 1250-1600, including the evolutionary developments of Mannerism and the beginnings of Baroque Art.
3

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 488 Art of the Nineteenth Century

Study of art and architecture from the 19th century, with a focus on Europe and America.
3

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

ART 489 Contemporary Art

An in-depth study of style characteristics and cultural contexts of modern, late modern and postmodern art.
3

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 492 Internship in Art

Supervised professional activity in major field of study. Must spend a minimum of 30 clock hours per credit hour.
1- 5

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Art & Design (and) Visual Arts Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 493 Museum Studies Practicum

This course provides emerging museum professionals hands on experience, skill-sets, and theories essential in producing museum quality exhibitions within the field of Museum Studies.
3

Prerequisites

ART 426 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 495 Topics in Art

In depth study of topics in art and art history.
1- 4

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ART 496 Art of the Twentieth Century

In depth study of art in Europe and the Americas from 1900 through post-modernism.
3

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

AS 101 United States Air Force Heritage and Values I

This course is designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and provides an overview of the basic characteristics, missions, and organization of the Air Force.

1

AS 102 United States Air Force Heritage and Values II

This course is designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and provides an overview of the basic characteristics, missions, and organization of the Air Force.

1

Special Notes

AS104 (GMC Leadership Lab II) is a required co-requisite to this course.

AS 103 General Military Course Leadership Laboratory

This is a mandatory laboratory designed to complement AS 101 by providing cadets with leadership, management and followership experiences. S/U graded.
1

AS 104 General Military Course Leadership Laboratory II

This is a mandatory laboratory designed to complement AS 102 by providing cadets with leadership, management and followership experiences. S/U graded.
1

AS 201 USAF Team and Leadership Fundamentals I

This course provides a fundamental understanding of both leadership and team building. The lessons and course flow are designed to prepare cadets for field training and leadership positions in the detachment.

1

Special Notes

AS203 (GMC Leadership Lab) is a required co-requisite to this course.

AS 202 USAF Team and Leadership Fundamentals II

This course provides a fundamental understanding of both leadership and team building. The lessons and course flow are designed to prepare cadets for field training and leadership positions in the detachment.

1

Special Notes

AS204 (GMC Leadership Lab) is a required co-requisite to this course.

AS 203 General Military Course Leadership Laboratory III

This is a mandatory laboratory designed to complement AS 201 by providing cadets with leadership, management and followership experiences. S/U graded.
1

AS 204 General Military Course Leadership Laboratory IV

This is a mandatory laboratory designed to complement AS 202 by providing cadets with leadership, management and followership experiences. S/U graded.
1

AS 301 USAF Leading People and Effective Communication I

This course utilizes cadets' field training experience to take a more in-depth look at leadership. Special emphasis is placed on enhancing communication skills, and why that is important as a leader. Cadets have an opportunity to try out these leadership and management techniques in a supervised environment as juniors and seniors.

3

Special Notes

AS303 (POC Leadership Lab) is a required co-requisite to this course.

AS 302 USAF Leading People and Effective Communication II

This course utilizes cadet's field training experience to take a more in-depth look at leadership. Special emphasis is placed on enhancing communication skills, and why that is important as a leader. Cadets have an opportunity to try out these leadership and management techniques in a supervised environment as juniors and seniors.

3

Special Notes

AS304 (POC Leadership Lab) is a required co-requisite to this course.

AS 303 Professional Officer Course Leadership Laboratory V

Mandatory for students who are members of ROTC or are eligible to pursue a commission as determined by the Professor of Aerospace Studies. Concept of leadership; relationship between leadership and management; importance of leadership in operation and success of organization.
1

AS 304 Professional Officer Course Leadership Laboratory VII

Mandatory for students who are members of ROTC or are eligible to pursue a commission as determined by the Professor of Aerospace Studies. Concept of leadership; relationship between leadership and management; importance of leadership in operation and success of organization.

1

AS 401 National Security/Commissioning Preparation I

This course provides college seniors a foundation to understand their role as future military officers and how they will support the United States' National Security Strategy. It provides an overview of the complex social and political issues facing the military profession and requires a measure of sophistication commensurate with the senior college level.

3

Special Notes

AS403 (POC Leadership Lab) is a required co-requisite to this course.

AS 402 National Security/Commissioning Preparation II

This course provides college seniors a foundation to understand their role as future military officers and how they will support the United States' National Security Strategy. It provides an overview of the complex social and political issues facing the military profession and requires a measure of sophistication commensurate with the senior college level.

3

Special Notes

AS404 (POC Leadership Lab) is a required co-requisite to this course.

AS 403 Professional Officer Course Leadership Laboratory VII

Mandatory for student who are members of ROTC or are eligible to pursue a commission as determined by the Professor of Aerospace Studies. Concept of leadership; relationship between leadership and management; importance of leadership in operation and success of organization.
1

AS 404 Professional Officer Course Leadership Laboratory VIII

Mandatory for students who are members of ROTC or are eligible to pursue a commission as determined by the Professor of Aerospace Studies. Concept of leadership; relationship between leadership and management; importance of leadership in operation and success of organization.
1

ASIA 116 State, Society, and Culture in Contemporary Asia

A survey of modern Asia in the aftermath of WW II to the present times with special emphasis on its geo-politics, internal as well as international politics, socio-economic development, society and cultures.
3

ASIA 216 South and Southeast Asian Literature

Surveys major literary works of South and Southeast Asia. Examines regional beliefs, philosophies, world views, traditions, and norms. Explores the adaptation of regional literature into other media.

3

Course Attribute

LC3b-Literature & Humanities and AH2-GT Literature and LC7-International Studies

ASIA 248 Asian Musical Culture

Survey of the music of the Asian continent and their roles in society, religion, history, and politics. Examines theoretical systems, modes of learning, musical instruments, ensembles, and performance practices by cultural groups. Also examines significant genres in national and folk traditions. Explores the impact of westernization and modernization on musical cultures as well as new musical practices in the world music markets of the twenty-first century.

3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ASIA 248 and MUS 248

Course Attribute

LC3a-Arts and AH1-GT Arts and LC7-International Studies

ASIA 392 Internship in Asian Studies

Supervised work experience in the public or private sector to allow students practical experience with Asian business practices. S/U Graded.
2- 5

Prerequisites

GPA-2.5

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 1 times

ASIA 475 Research Seminar

Capstone course in which students demonstrate a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, and conduct advanced research on an important issue in Asian Studies, culminating in a senior thesis. Required for completion of Asian Studies degree.

3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ASIA 475 and FR 475 and GER 475

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

ASIA 499 Asian Studies Thesis

Conduct advanced independent research in an approved topic in Asian Studies with an Asian Studies faculty member. Required for completion of degree in Asian Studies. S/U Graded.
3

ASL 101 American Sign Language I

Introduces basics of American Sign Language and Deaf Culture; designed for students for have limited/no knowledge of ASL, focusing on receptive and expressive skills in basic conversation, dialogue, vocabulary development.
3

Course Attribute

LC8-US Multicultural Studies

ASL 102 American Sign Language II

Expands knowledge of/experiences in American Sign Language skills and Deaf Culture; develops communicative competence at beginning level focusing on receptive and expressive skills in basic conversations, dialogue, vocabulary development.
3

Prerequisites

ASL 101 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

LC8-US Multicultural Studies

ASL 201 American Sign Language III

Continues to expand knowledge of experiences in American Sign Language and Deaf Culture; designed to emphasize ASL grammar and sentence structure and to develop communicative competence at intermediate level.
3

Prerequisites

ASL 102 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

LC3d-World Languages and LC8-US Multicultural Studies and GT Foreign Languages

ASL 202 American Sign Language IV

Emphasizes ASL vocabulary, grammar structure to develop communicative competence at intermediate level, promoting awareness of cultural behaviors, rules of discourse, and explores regional and dialectal variations in ASL.
3

Prerequisites

ASL 201 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

LC3d-World Languages and LC8-US Multicultural Studies and GT Foreign Languages

ASL 310 Deaf Culture and Community

This course is a survey of psychosocial and sociocultural factors that define Deaf people as members of a linguistic and cultural minority. The history, language, values, and traditions of the deaf community will also be examined.
3

Prerequisites

ASL 202 with a minimum grade of D-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include American Sign Language (and) American Sign Lang-Eng Interpr (and) American Sign Lang Eng Interpr Major(s)/Minor(s)

ASLS 160 Introduction to Human Communication and Its Disorders

Survey identifying characteristics, causes, diagnosis and treatment of speech, language, and hearing disorders. Includes disorders in hearing, stuttering, voice, articulation, child language, adult aphasia, head injury and dementia.
3

Course Attribute

LC5c-Hum Behav & Social Sys and GT Human Behavior & Soc Sys

ASLS 220 Musical Acoustics and Health Issues

This hands-on exploratory course is designed to introduce students to the nature of sound energy as it relates to musical acoustics and its biophysical impacts on vocal and hearing health.
3

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ASLS 260 Introduction to Phonetics

Characteristics of American English speech sounds and the International Phonetic Alphabet symbols used to represent them. Typical and atypical phonological processes and the transcription of speech sound errors.

3

ASLS 266 Normal Speech and Language Development

Normal speech and language development and their relationship to other aspects of child development. Should be taken after the English composition LAC requirement is completed.
3

ASLS 267 Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism

Structure and function of the speech and auditory/vestibular mechanisms.

4

Prerequisites

(BIO 110 with a minimum grade of C- or (BIO 100 and BIO 105 with a minimum grade of C-)) and (BIO 245 with a minimum grade of C-)

ASLS 343 Fundamentals of Physiological and Biological Acoustics

The physics of sound as it relates to speech and hearing. Should be taken after the mathematics LAC requirement is completed.
2

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ASLS 360 Articulation and Voice Disorders

Current information regarding identification, causation, diagnosis and treatment of disorders of articulation and voice disorders.

3

Prerequisites

ASLS 260 with a minimum grade of C-

ASLS 365 Language Disorders in Children

Analysis of aspects of language as they relate to treatment of language disorders in children.

3

Prerequisites

ASLS 266 with a minimum grade of C-

ASLS 366 Language Sampling Processes

Methods of eliciting language samples from children and manual and computerized language sampling analyses.

1

Prerequisites

ASLS 266 with a minimum grade of C-

ASLS 370 Basic Audiology

Pathologies and disorders of the auditory vestibular system, pure-tone testing, methods of speech audiometry, interpretation of audiometric data in terms of physical, social and educational effects. An introduction to aural rehabilitation.
4

ASLS 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 4

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

ASLS 431 Organically-Based Communication Disorders

Current information regarding identification, causation, diagnosis and treatment of organically-based communication disorders, including cleft palate, cerebral palsy and aphasia.

3

Prerequisites

ASLS 267 with a minimum grade of C-

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

ASLS 469 Clinical Processes in Speech-Language Pathology

Philosophy and implementation of diagnosis, and treatment of communication disorders. Administration, scoring and interpretation of data from observation and tests/inventories. Development of treatment programs, evidence-based practice, ethics, and client-clinician relationships.

4

Prerequisites

(ASLS 360 and ASLS 365 with a minimum grade of C-)

ASLS 473 SLPA Seminar and Field Experience

Development of basic knowledge and competencies as a speech language pathology assistant through participation in classroom activities, observations and reflections, and collaborative teaching of children with communication disorders. Field experience under professional supervision.

4

Prerequisites

ASLS 469 with a minimum grade of C-

Special Notes

25 documented observation hours in the major and a 3.0 major GPA are required.

ASLS 474 Clinical Practicum in Audiology

Perform basic audiometric testing: audiometric screening, routine hearing evaluation and impedance audiometry. S/U graded.

1

Prerequisites

ASLS 370 with a minimum grade of C-

Special Notes

25 documented observation hours in the major and a 3.0 major GPA are required.

ASLS 478 Aural Rehabilitation and Amplification

A study of basic principles of aural rehabilitation and the use of amplification systems for hearing impaired individuals including personal hearing aids and other specialized assistive listening/alerting devices.

3

Prerequisites

ASLS 370 with a minimum grade of C-

Class Restriction

Include Senior

ASLS 483 Entry/Primary Speech-Language Pathology Practicum

Learn general principles of the clinical process. Provide supervised individual therapy to clients with communication disorders. S/U graded.

2

Prerequisites

ASLS 469 with a minimum grade of C-

Special Notes

25 documented observation hours in the major and a 3.0 GPA in major courses required.

ASLS 487 Advanced Audiology

Theory and practice of advanced techniques of audiometric assessment.

3

Prerequisites

(ASLS 267 and ASLS 370 with a minimum grade of C-)

AST 100 The Sky and Planets

(3 lecture, 2 laboratory) The universe and our place in it. Appropriate for non-science majors.
4

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and LCLB-Science Lab Course and GT Physical & Life Science

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

AST 101 Stars and Galaxies

(3 lecture, 2 laboratory) Covers stars, black holes, galaxies, the Big Bang, and the expansion of the universe. Night time lab component. Appropriate for non-science majors.
4

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and LCLB-Science Lab Course and GT Physical & Life Science

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

AST 109 The Cosmos

Present concepts of the universe, including the "big bang" and "steady state" theories, black holes and continuing expansion. Programs such as "Cosmos" will be studied.
3

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and GT Physical & Life Sciences

AST 301 Classical Astronomy and the Solar System

A look at classical astronomy (motions in the night sky), telescopes, and our solar system.
3

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

AST 302 Stars and the Milky Way

A look at the structure, formation, and evolution of stars and the structure, dynamics, and formation of our Milky Way galaxy.
3

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

AST 303 Galaxy Formation and Cosmology

Formation and evolution of galaxies, general relativity, the Big Bang, evolution and fate of the universe.
3

Prerequisites

MATH 132 with a minimum grade of D-

AST 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 4

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

BA 150 Foundations of Business Thought

Course will introduce the student to the cultural, historical, and philosophical thought surrounding the issues of business throughout the ages.
3

Course Attribute

LC3c-Ways of Thinking and GT Ways of Thinking

BA 205 Business Communications

Composition courses emphasizing planning, organizing, and presenting written business communications for decision making. Use of computer software programs integrated in the writing of business correspondence and reports.
3

Prerequisites

(ENG 122 with a minimum grade of D- or SAT Verbal with a minimum score of 630 or ACT English with a minimum score of 30 or SAT Reading Test with a minimum score of 34)

Course Attribute

LC1b-Intermediate Composition and GT Intermediate Composition

BA 251 International Business

Non-technical introduction to global business operations and planning, including investment issues, comparative management, technology impact, competition, cultural diversity and legal issues.
3

Course Attribute

LC7-International Studies

BA 299 Professional Experience

Active engagement in professional activities related to field of study. Course will provide problem-solving and independent decision making opportunities. S/U graded.
0

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

BA 415 International Experience/Study Abroad

This course consists of a minimum of twenty one days of study or academic/business experience that provides the student with significant observation of and/or interaction with business/management in a different culture.
1

BA 460 International Business and Culture

This seminar course is designed to provide students an in-depth understanding of the cultural values and norms abroad and how they translate into various business practices. International travel will be required.
3

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BA 495 Executive Professor Special Topics II

A seminar for junior and senior majors and minors, taught by business executives, integrating practical experience into the theoretical curriculum. Topic varies per expertise of Executive Professor. S/U or letter graded.
1- 3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

BAAC 220 Principles of Accounting I

An introduction to basic principles of accounting. The accounting cycle is examined in relation to recording, classifying, reporting and interpreting financial information for business.
3

Prerequisites

(24.0 credits required) and (BACS 101 with a minimum grade of C-)

BAAC 221 Principles of Accounting II

The course examines the concepts and applications of managerial accounting which provides economic, financial, and nonfinancial information for managers and other internal users.
3

Prerequisites

(BACS 101 and BAAC 220 with a minimum grade of C-)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

BAAC 301 Survey of Accounting

No graduation credit for business majors. A survey course studying accounting as the language of business. Topics include the environment, methods and uses of accounting information, financial statement development and use, and cost information development and analysis for decision making.
3

Major/Minor Restriction

Exclude Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAAC 320 Intermediate Accounting I

An activity course stressing the conceptual framework of accounting, a review of the accounting process, statement presentations of current assets, property, plant, equipment and intangible assets.
3

Prerequisites

BAAC 221 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAAC 321 Intermediate Accounting II

An activity course with emphasis on current and long-term liabilities, investments, stockholders' equity, pensions, leases, income taxes and cash flows.
3

Prerequisites

BAAC 320 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAAC 322 Fraud Examination

An introduction to occupational fraud and white-collar crime with a focus on how and why fraud is committed and how fraud is detected, investigated, resolved, and deterred.
3

Prerequisites

BAAC 220 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Computer Information Systems (and) Network/Info Systems Security (and) Nonprofit Administration (and) Entrepreneurship (and) Global Business (and) Business Administration Major(s)/Minor(s)

BAAC 323 Cost and Managerial Accounting I

Accumulating and analyzing information for management purposes. Topics include product costing, cost-volume-profit relationships, budgeting and performance evaluation.
3

Prerequisites

BAAC 221 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAAC 325 Income Tax I

A comprehensive introduction to federal income taxation with emphasis on tax implications of business transactions. Basic tax concepts are applied to a broad range of taxpayer activities and related entities.
3

Prerequisites

BAAC 221 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAAC 328 Accounting Systems

An activity course designed to study elements of accounting information systems. Conceptual modeling, implementation of accounting transaction processing systems, enterprise value chains, business processes, documentation, and control requirements are emphasized.
3

Prerequisites

(BACS 300 and BAAC 221 with a minimum grade of C-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAAC 329 Tax Cases

A case-based course that promotes understanding and application of tax and business research planning. Emphasis is on researching, solving, and presenting business tax planning cases. S/U graded.
3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

BAAC 421 Advanced Accounting

An activity course covering business combinations, consolidated financial statements, partnerships,segmental reporting and foreign operations.
3

Prerequisites

BAAC 321 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Accounting Concentration(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAAC 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.) Letter graded.
1- 3

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

BAAC 424 Accounting Ethics

This course will provide framework tools of ethical decision-making in order to challenge the student to identify and examine their own ethical strategies. This course specifically focuses on the ethical issues that influence the development of both the public and private accounting professions.
3

Prerequisites

BAAC 320 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAAC 425 Auditing I

This is an activity course covering an overview of U.S. GAAS procedures and techniques of auditing including auditor's report, internal control, evidence gathering, legal liability, statistical sampling and computer auditing.
3

Prerequisites

BAAC 320 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior

BAAC 427 Governmental and Institutional Accounting

This is an activity course involving the study of accounting processes and procedures used by state and local government units and other selected not-for-profit entities.
3

Prerequisites

BAAC 221 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAAC 429 Income Tax II

An activity course that promotes understanding beyond a foundation course. Emphasis is on advanced topics in individual and entities taxation with a focus on tax policy issues and planning implications.
3

Prerequisites

BAAC 325 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAAC 492 Internship in Accounting

Practical work experience allowing the intern the opportunity to utilize the material learned in accounting courses. Credit for the internship is determined by the coordinator. S/U graded.
3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 3 times or course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

BAAC 495 Special Topics in Accounting

This seminar course explores advanced topics in accounting. Special topics will be specified by the instructor. S/U or letter graded.
1- 3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

BACS 101 Business Computing

Develop students' knowledge and skills in applying and utilizing appropriate computer technology and applications. Focus is on developing competencies in leading edge computer applications: spreadsheets, graphics, word processing and operating systems. Students will become competent in using the Internet.
3

Course Attribute

Liberal Arts Core Elective

BACS 180 Introduction to Software Engineering

This course examines the principles and theories of software engineering as a discipline. It introduces students to vocabulary, basic principles, and the foundation of software engineering. Software engineering covers concepts to create practical and cost-effective solutions to computing and information systems requirements.
1

BACS 200 Web Design and Development for Small Business

Computer literacy required. Study web site design concepts for e-business applications. Designing, developing, publishing, and managing web sites will be emphasized. Projects focus on web presence requirements for small and midsized companies.
3

BACS 287 Graphical Interface Programming

Covers modern programming languages geared for graphical user interfaces and interactive processing. This course introduces students to end-user computing, human factors, graphical programming environments and event-driven programming.
3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration (and) Software Engineering (and) Computer Information Systems Major(s)/Minor(s)

BACS 300 Information Systems

Topics include information systems technology, strategic uses of information, software, hardware concepts, networking and internet and e-commerce.

3

Prerequisites

( 45.0 credits required) and (BACS 101 or CS 101 or CS 120 with a minimum grade of D-)

BACS 350 Intermediate Web Development

An activity course to develop students' knowledge and skills in developing interactive, data driven e-commerce web sites. Students will employ cutting edge development techniques using industry standard software applications.
3

Prerequisites

BACS 200 with a minimum grade of D-

BACS 371 Introduction to Computer Forensics

The identification, preservation, extraction, interpretation, and presentation of computer-related evidence. Formal methodologies; basics of computer operating systems, file systems and hardware for data storage; fundamental laws and regulations.

3

BACS 380 Networking and Data Communications Systems

This is an activity course involving the study of data communications and networks. Topics include history, media, hardware, software, standards, networks, analysis and design, distributed processing and network management.
3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration (and) Entrepreneurship (and) Global Business (and) Computer Information Systems (and) Nonprofit Administration (and) Network/Info Systems Security (and) Software Engineering Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BACS 382 Information Security

First course in information security techniques: study of foundations of security and risk management, implementation of security plans, hands-on analysis of realtime networks using common tools, and defensive techniques.
3

Prerequisites

BACS 380 with a minimum grade of D-

BACS 383 Designing User Experiences

This course presents principles and processes for designing efficient, effective, and satisfying user experiences. The course focuses on user interaction with digital interfaces including mobile phones and websites.
3

Prerequisites

(BACS 200 with a minimum grade of C-) and (BACS 287 or CS 200 with a minimum grade of C-)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BACS 385 Fundamentals of Project Management

This course examines the defining characteristics of IT projects. It introduces the student to industry accepted project management practices and methods. The students will utilize mainstream software tools to apply project management to IT projects identifying common processes and techniques required for successful project completion.
3

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BACS 387 Object Oriented Systems Development

Introduces the concepts of object-oriented design to students with a background in the procedural paradigm. Emphasis on the development of business applications.
3

Prerequisites

BACS 287 with a minimum grade of D-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Entrepreneurship (and) Business Administration (and) Global Business (and) Computer Information Systems (and) Nonprofit Administration (and) Network/Info Systems Security (and) Software Engineering Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BACS 392 Systems Platforms and Network Development

An activity course providing students with the opportunity to work with and manage network servers. The course focuses on implementation of UNIX and Microsoft networking platforms, security, and management.
3

Prerequisites

BACS 380 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BACS 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.) Letter Graded.
1- 3

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

BACS 485 Database Management Systems

An activity course covering design, implementation and operation of database systems/applications. Topics include database processing, models, organizational planning, logical and physical design, implementation, data organization and data structures.
3

Prerequisites

(BACS 287 and BACS 300 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration (and) Entrepreneurship (and) Global Business (and) Computer Information Systems (and) Nonprofit Administration (and) Network/Info Systems Security (and) Software Engineering Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior

BACS 487 Systems Analysis and Design

An activity course that covers systems analysis and design; emphasizes techniques, tools, skills, procedures and end products. Covers investigation, analysis/design.
3

Prerequisites

(BACS 287 and BACS 300 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Computer Information Systems (and) Software Engineering Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior

BACS 488 Senior CIS Project

This is an activity course in which students learn and apply software engineering standards and patterns to design, implement, and test software systems.
3

Prerequisites

(BACS 387 or CS 350 with a minimum grade of C-) and (BACS 487 with a minimum grade of C-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration (and) Entrepreneurship (and) Global Business (and) Computer Information Systems (and) Nonprofit Administration (and) Network/Info Systems Security (and) Software Engineering Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior

BACS 492 Internship in Computer Information Systems

Obtain practical experience in one or more of the following CIS areas: programming, systems design, DBMS, quantitative research, data communications, DSS. S/U graded.
1- 3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration (and) Entrepreneurship (and) Global Business (and) Computer Information Systems (and) Nonprofit Administration (and) Network/Info Systems Security (and) Software Engineering Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 3 credit hours

BACS 495 Special Topics in CIS

This seminar course explores advanced topics in computer information systems and/or quantitative methods. S/U or letter graded.
1- 3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

BAFN 231 Legal Environment of Business

Emphasizes public law, regulation of business and various relationships that exist within society, government and business such as; economic regulation, social regulation, laws impacting labor-management issues and environmental concern.
3

BAFN 240 Introduction to Personal Financial Planning

Discuss concepts and principles of personal financial planning including personal financial assessment, goal setting, planning and management of personal assets, credit, insurance, investments, estates and taxes.
3

Course Attribute

Liberal Arts Core Elective

BAFN 302 Essentials of Business Finance

Examines the basic principles and concepts of financial management. Topics include valuation, risk, financial analysis and planning, working capital management, cost of capital, capital structure and capital budgeting.
3

Prerequisites

(BAAC 301 with a minimum grade of D-) and (ECON 205 with a minimum grade of D-) and (Completion of LC2-Mathematics course)

Major/Minor Restriction

Exclude Business Administration Major(s)

BAFN 305 Intermediate Business Statistics

Topics include a review of statistical estimation and hypothesis testing, ANOVA, simple and multiple regression, forecasting and decision theory. Students will use Excel and a number of web-based databases.
3

Prerequisites

(Concurrent Prerequisite BACS 101 with a minimum grade of D-) and (MATH 131 or MATH 176 with a minimum grade of D-) and (STAT 150 with a minimum grade of D-)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAFN 332 Business Administration and the Law

Provides an understanding of the law of business transactions as part of the decision making process. Topics will include the law of contracts, sales, bailments and negotiable instruments.
3

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAFN 340 Principles of Risk and Insurance

Theory of risk and risk bearing; arrangements; insurance industry, types of insurers, functions of insurers and government regulation of insurance; social insurance; and basic features of selected insurance contracts.
3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAFN 370 Business Finance

Examines the basic principles and concepts of financial management. Topics include valuation, risk, financial analysis and planning, working capital management, cost of capital, capital structure and capital budgeting.
3

Prerequisites

(BAAC 221 and ECON 203 and ECON 205 and STAT 150 with a minimum grade of D-) and (MATH 124 with a minimum grade of D- or ACT Math with a minimum score of 26 or SAT Mathematics with a minimum score of 560 or SAT Math Section with a minimum score of 580)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAFN 371 Financial Markets and Institutions

Analyze characteristics and interrelations between money and capital markets and flow of funds. Stress financial institutions' role as intermediaries and effect on economic activity.
3

Prerequisites

ECON 203 with a minimum grade of D-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAFN 372 Introduction to Real Estate

Discover important concepts and principles of real estate, especially procedures for evaluating and appraising real estate investments, legal marketing and financing aspects of real estate.
3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAFN 375 Multinational Financial Management

Addresses the financial characteristics and environment of the multinational corporation. Special attention is focused on how international risk factors and foreign securities markets affect financial decisions.
3

Prerequisites

BAFN 370 with a minimum grade of D-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAFN 379 Investments

The study of financial securities, their valuation and the markets where they are traded. Analyze economic and market factors affecting risk, returns, and timing of investment decisions.
3

Prerequisites

BAFN 370 with a minimum grade of D-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAFN 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.) Letter Graded.
1- 3

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

BAFN 470 Financial Management

Covers advanced concepts and techniques of financial management, especially emphasizing the overall environment and decision making by financial managers. Topics include modern portfolio theory and capital structure theory.
3

Prerequisites

BAFN 370 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAFN 473 Commercial Bank Management

Investigate the management of banks and other financial institutions. Evaluate decision strategies used to enhance performance in a changing economic and regulatory environment. Review banking principles, current practices problems.
3

Prerequisites

(BAFN 370 and BAFN 371 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAFN 474 Case Problems in Financial Management

This seminar class involves the comprehensive study of applied financial management, finance, other business skills and financial decision making processes for the firm. Use case study problem solving method.
3

Prerequisites

BAFN 470 with a minimum grade of D-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAFN 478 Student and Foundation Fund

Involves students managing a portfolio of funds provided by the UNC Foundation while studying and applying the principles of security analysis and portfolio management. S/U graded.
3

Prerequisites

BAFN 379 with a minimum grade of D-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

BAFN 479 Portfolio Management

This second level investment course examines investment decision making within the framework of modern portfolio theory. Alternative investments including derivatives (options and futures) are also examined.
3

Prerequisites

BAFN 379 with a minimum grade of D-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAFN 492 Internship in Finance

Get practical experience and opportunities to utilize theory of academic finance courses. S/U graded.
1- 3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 3 credit hours

BAFN 495 Special Topics in Finance

This seminar course explores advanced topics in finance. S/U or letter graded.
1- 3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

BAMG 125 Taking Care of Business

(Lecture 2, Recitation 1)The course is designed to provide students with several types of information that will help them make more informed decisions related to their academic and professional career. This information will assist them in making decisions related to business emphases they may wish to pursue as well as decisions related to careers and career paths that are available to them.
3

BAMG 350 Management and Organizational Behavior

An introduction to management and organizational behavior including theories and concepts applicable to individuals, teams, and organizations. Topics include managerial processes, motivation, leadership, group dynamics, perception, decision-making, power, culture, change, communication, diversity, and ethics.

3

Prerequisites

45.0 credits required

BAMG 353 Human Resources Management

A survey of human resource management topics such as recruitment, selection, training, development, performance appraisal, compensation, career development.
3

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMG 355 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship

The objective of this course is to provide significant exposure to the entrepreneurial process. Students will learn how to recognize and evaluate small business opportunities and successful entrepreneurial practices.
3

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMG 356 Business Planning

This course is designed as an activity course emphasizing the creation of a business plan. Students will learn problems and opportunities of starting new businesses.

3

Prerequisites

(BAMG 350 and BAMG 355 and BAAC 301 and BAFN 302 and ECON 205 with a minimum grade of C-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMG 390 Operations Management

An activity based course covering the efficient and effective production of goods and services. The course focuses upon appropriate application of analytical techniques and software tools for sustainable and lean operational decisions. Topics covered include: manufacturing processes, service processes, quality management analysis, capacity management, and lean/sustainable operations.
3

Prerequisites

(BACS 101 and STAT 150 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMG 407 Small Business Counseling

A seminar course which applies theories learned in all business majors to actual small businesses.

3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: BAMG 407 and BAMK 407

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration and Entrepreneurship Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMG 410 Innovation and Entrepreneurship

This course provides a practical guide and clear understanding of the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and experiences that are needed to increase imagination, creativity, innovation and new venture creation capability.

3

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMG 411 Social Entrepreneurship

This course brings the mindset, principles, strategies, tools and techniques of entrepreneurship into the social sector to present innovative solutions to today’s vexing social issues.

3

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMG 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.) Letter graded.
1- 3

Prerequisites

BAMG 350 with a minimum grade of C-

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

BAMG 451 Managing New Business Ventures

An activity course emphasizing the creation and execution of a business plan in concert with a small business owner. Students will learn problems and opportunities of starting new businesses.

3

Prerequisites

BAMG 355 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration (and) Entrepreneurship Minor Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMG 452 Business Ethics

A study of ethical conduct in various business contexts and an analysis of ethical issues that arise in organizational, social, and economic environments.
3

Prerequisites

BAMG 350 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior and Junior

BAMG 453 Advanced Topics in Human Resources Management

Provides an expanded examination of human resources management topics such as performance appraisal, training, compensation and labor relations. Current topics are emphasized.
3

Prerequisites

(BAMG 350 and BAMG 353 with a minimum grade of C-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior

BAMG 454 Leadership in Organizations

This course will examine leadership in organizations. Topics include an examination of differing leadership styles and theories and the ethical use of leadership and power.

3

Prerequisites

BAMG 350 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior

BAMG 456 Strategic Management

Examines organizational strategic issues and problems related to internal and external environments. Case analysis framework and strategic management concepts emphasized.

3

Prerequisites

(BAFN 370 and BAMG 350 and BAMK 360 with a minimum grade of C-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior

BAMG 457 Organizational Theory & Design

A study of organizational theory to design effective organizational purpose and structure to compete within dynamic external environmental and internal organizational factors.

3

Prerequisites

(BAMG 353 and BAMG 458 with a minimum grade of C-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior

BAMG 458 International Management

A seminar that examines the field of international management. Examines the implications of managing organizations involved in global operations.
3

Prerequisites

BAMG 350 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMG 459 Management of Quality

An introduction to managing quality in organizations, covering product and process design, understanding of basic quality tools, and implementation of improvement programs such as six sigma and lean enterprise.
3

Prerequisites

BAMG 350 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMG 461 Talent Management

Focuses on the creation of a competitive advantage through strategic human resources planning and staffing. Topics include job analysis, recruiting, assessment, succession planning, and retention. Also covers laws and regulations relative to the recruiting process.
3

Prerequisites

BAMG 353 with a minimum grade of C-

BAMG 462 Training & Organization Development

Examines key principles of an effective training and development strategy. Topics include the role of training, adult learning theory, needs assessment, training methodologies, and effective evaluation methods for training.
3

Prerequisites

BAMG 353 with a minimum grade of C-

BAMG 463 Compensation, Performance Management and Conflict Management

Focuses on the effective design of an organization’s compensation, total rewards, and performance management systems. Topics include total compensation systems that attract and retain talent, employee benefits and performance management.
3

Prerequisites

BAMG 353 with a minimum grade of C-

BAMG 492 Internship in Management

An internship working in a middle management position to obtain practical organizational experience. Internship proposal, progress report and final report required. S/U graded.

3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMG 494 Nonprofit Management

This course provides integration of management, marketing, finance and accounting principles for the management of nonprofit organizations. Topics include board development, risk management and ethical issues in nonprofit organizations.
3

Prerequisites

(BAFN 231 and BAFN 370 and BAMG 350 and BAMK 360 with a minimum grade of C-)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMG 495 Special Topics in Management

A seminar in various management content areas as need and opportunity arise. Primarily for management majors, this course attempts to integrate management concepts within applied settings. S/U or letter graded.

1-3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration and Entrepreneurship Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

BAMK 360 Marketing

This theory course provides understanding of the basic concepts/ terminologies in marketing, as well as an understanding of how these concepts are applied in international and domestic business settings.

3

Prerequisites

45.0 credits required

BAMK 361 Consumer Behavior

This theory course examines various theories of consumer behavior and the decision making process from a global perspective. The implications of cultural, ethical and legal variables will also be discussed.
3

Prerequisites

BAMK 360 with a minimum grade of C-

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMK 364 Selling and Sales Management

This is an activity course emphasizing both theoretical and practical skills in the personal selling process and the management of a sales force.

3

Prerequisites

BAMK 360 with a minimum grade of C-

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMK 365 Advertising and Promotion

An activity course involving study of integrated marketing communications with course components including advertising terminology, management, design, and media selection; personal selling; public relations; sponsorship; sales promotion; and Internet marketing.
3

Prerequisites

BAMK 360 with a minimum grade of C-

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMK 366 Retailing

An introductory survey course of retail institutions; how they operate and their impact on the marketplace. This course covers both theory and practice.
3

Prerequisites

BAMK 360 with a minimum grade of C-

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMK 368 Marketing Analysis and Research

An activity course involving practical experience in planning a research investigation, designing questionnaires, sampling, interpreting results and preparing a research report. Emphasis on product, advertising, sales and motivational research.
3

Prerequisites

(BAMK 360 with a minimum grade of C-) and (Concurrent Prerequisite STAT 150 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMK 371 Digital Marketing

The Internet and advances in technologies for e-commerce, web design, mobile marketing, social media marketing, and web analytics/measurement are transforming how companies, brands, and individuals plan and practice strategic marketing. This course provides students with an understanding of how marketing is adapting and integrating these changes for the digital age.
3

Prerequisites

BAMK 360 with a minimum grade of C-

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMK 407 Small Business Counseling

A seminar course which applies theories learned in all business majors to actual small businesses.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: BAMK 407 and BAMG 407

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMK 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.) Letter Graded.
1- 3

Prerequisites

BAMK 360 with a minimum grade of C-

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

BAMK 461 Advertising Campaigns

An interdisciplinary activity course where students receive realistic experience in campaign planning. Assume the identity of an advertising agency responsible for the preparation of a complete marketing communications program.

3

Prerequisites

BAMK 365 with a minimum grade of C-

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMK 464 Global Marketing Strategies

A seminar of institutions, functions, policies and practices in international markets. Global multinational aspects of business enterprises and their effects on marketing problems and management are analyzed.
3

Prerequisites

BAMK 360 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMK 468 Business-to-Business Marketing

A course in theoretical and practical aspects of marketing goods and services to business. Emphasizes analysis and segmentation of business markets and development of marketing mixes to serve those markets.

3

Prerequisites

BAMK 360 with a minimum grade of C-

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMK 469 Supply Chain Management

An activity seminar course designed to explore the techniques utilized by marketing oriented distribution managers within the worldwide logistics process. Computer simulation and/or case analysis may be used.

3

Prerequisites

BAMK 360 with a minimum grade of C-

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMK 478 Social Media Marketing

This course is an overview of social media marketing planning and strategies and its integration with traditional methods of marketing. It includes real-world, real-time experience with social media/networking with use of various social media platforms for blogging and micro-blogging, supporting tools for the monitoring/measurement of results, and the management of social media/networking activities.
3

Prerequisites

BAMK 360 with a minimum grade of C-

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMK 490 Marketing Strategies

This capstone marketing seminar course emphasizes application, analysis, planning and control of the various marketing mix variables, the target market, and the marketing environment.
3

Prerequisites

(BAFN 370 and BAMK 361 with a minimum grade of C-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Marketing Concentration(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior

BAMK 492 Internship in Marketing

This course gives the student practical experience and opportunities to apply theory from academic marketing courses. S/U graded.

3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

BAMK 494 Seminar in Digital Marketing

This seminar course focus on current topics in digital marketing not covered in existing departmental offerings.

3

Prerequisites

BAMK 360 with a minimum grade of C-

Class Restriction

Include Juniors and Seniors

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

BAMK 495 Special Topics in Marketing

This seminar course explores various advanced marketing topics. The course is offered as needed. S/U or letter graded.
1- 3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Business Administration Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

BIO 100 Exploring Biology

Biological concepts within a human context covering cell biology, physiology, genetics, evolution, ecology and interactions of human kind and the environment. No credit for biology majors or minors.
3

Major/Minor Restriction

Exclude Biological Sciences Major(s)

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and GT Physical & Life Sciences

BIO 102 Success in Biology I

An introduction to life at UNC, the biology major, and biology careers for incoming freshman. S/U graded.
1

BIO 105 Exploring Biology Lab

Exploring biology lab.
1

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite BIO 100 with a minimum grade of C-

Major/Minor Restriction

Exclude Biological Sciences Major(s)

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and LCLB-Science Lab Course and GT Physical & Life Science

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

BIO 109 Foundations for PreHealth

An introduction to life at the university, the biology major, and preparation for a healthcare career.
1

BIO 110 Biology: Atoms to Cells

Introduction to fundamental chemistry of life, cell biology, genetics, and biology as an interdisciplinary science.  Study of scientific practice through a course-based undergraduate research experience. Not recommended for non-science majors.

4

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and LCLB-Science Lab Course and GT Physical & Life Science

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

BIO 111 Biology: Organisms to Ecosystems

Introduction to the biology of organisms focusing on form, function, ecology, and evolution.  Study of scientific practice through a course-based undergraduate research experience. Not recommended for non-science majors.

4

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and LCLB-Science Lab Course and SC1-GT Physical & Life Science

BIO 210 Cell Biology

Study cellular basis of life, with emphasis on biological macromolecules, cell organelles, cell membranes, cellular respiration and photosynthesis, and evolution of cells.
3

Prerequisites

(BIO 110 with a minimum grade of D-) and (Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 112L or Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 112 or Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 231 or Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 281 or Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 281L with a minimum grade of D-) and (CHEM 111L or CHEM 111 with a minimum grade of D-)

BIO 220 Genetics

Study fundamental laws of heredity, the molecular structure and function of genes, and emerging genetic technologies.
4

Prerequisites

(BIO 110 and BIO 210 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

BIO 245 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Stress regulatory mechanisms that maintain normal body function and broad general biological principles as they apply to structure and function.
4

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

BIO 246 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology

(2 lecture, 3 laboratory) Study of regulation of cellular and systemic physiology, including membrane transport, cell cycle, autonomic nervous system, cardiovascular system, renal function and metabolism as they relate to homeostasis. Inquiry based laboratory.
3

Prerequisites

BIO 245 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

BIO 251 Allied Health Microbiology

(3 lecture, 3 lab) Basic microbiology course with applications for allied health professions such as nursing. Emphasis is on microorganisms involved in human health and disease, and microbiology in public health.
4

Prerequisites

(BIO 110 with a minimum grade of D- or (BIO 100 and BIO 105 with a minimum grade of D-))

Major/Minor Restriction

Exclude Biological Sciences Major(s)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

BIO 320 Introduction to Medical Genetics

Study the principles of medical genetics including a review of gene function, patterns of inheritance, mechanisms of common genetic diseases, genetic testing, genetic counseling and risk assessment, and gene therapy.
3

Prerequisites

BIO 220 with a minimum grade of D-

BIO 325 Introduction to Cancer Biology

Study an overview of the causes, prevention, molecular and cellular mechanisms, and treatment of various cancers.
3

Prerequisites

(BIO 105 or BIO 110 with a minimum grade of D-)

BIO 328 Introduction to Developmental Biology

The study of early embryonic development: exploration of the molecular genetic basis for tissue differentiation. Gene regulation, chromatin, axis and pattern formation, tissue interactions and differentiation, and sex determination.
3

Prerequisites

BIO 220 with a minimum grade of D-

BIO 329 Field Botany

(2 Lecture, 1 Field) Application of botanical techniques in a field setting. Course includes species identification, collection of plant specimens, plant community structure, rare plant management, and field based botanical data collection. Field trip required.
3

Prerequisites

BIO 111 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Participation Fee Required

BIO 330 Plant Systematics

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) History of plant taxonomy, phylogenetic systematics, family recognition, and identification of local flora using keys. Native plant collection and field trips required.
4

Prerequisites

BIO 111 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Course Fee Required and Participation Fee Required

BIO 331 General Entomology

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Study of the biology of the principal orders of insects by collecting and classifying specimens. Agents and vectors of disease are stressed. Insect collection is required.
4

Prerequisites

BIO 111 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Participation Fee Required

BIO 333 General Parasitology

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Study of the symbiotic relationships of parasitism as exemplified by typical parasites of humans, domesticated and wild animals, stressing life cycles, pathogenesis, systematics and host-parasite relationships.
4

Prerequisites

(BIO 105 or BIO 111 with a minimum grade of D-)

BIO 334 Mammalogy

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Study of the functional biology, ecology and behavior of mammals. Laboratory stresses the identification and ecology of Colorado species. Field work required.
4

Prerequisites

BIO 111 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Course Fee Required and Participation Fee Required

BIO 335 Survey of Fishes, Amphibians and Reptiles

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Investigation of the biology of the cold-blooded vertebrates including their evolution, ecology and behavior. Laboratory stresses the identification and biology of Colorado species.
4

Prerequisites

BIO 111 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Participation Fee Required

BIO 336 Animal Plant Interactions

A survey of terrestrial plant-animal interactions with an emphasis on plant antagonistic and mutualistic interactions.

3

Prerequisites

BIO 111 with a minimum grade of D-

BIO 337 Morphogenesis of Algae and Fungi

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Study of structure, morphogenesis and phylogenetic relationships of organisms grouped with algae, fungi. Comparative study to explore multiple kingdom concepts. Ecological, medical and economic aspects of mycology and phycology explored.
4

Prerequisites

BIO 111 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Course Fee Required and Participation Fee Required

BIO 338 Marine Biology

Study of marine organisms and their habitats from the intertidal to the deep sea. Emphasis is on the adaptation to environmental factors, ecological relationships and conservation.
3

Prerequisites

(BIO 110 or BIO 111 with a minimum grade of D-)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior and Sophomore

BIO 339 Marine Biology Lab in Belize

An intensive field experience in Belize which introduces participants to tropical marine and the terrestrial environment. Course occurs during spring break.
1

Prerequisites

(BIO 110 or BIO 111 with a minimum grade of D-)

Corequisites

BIO 338

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

BIO 341 Human Anatomy

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Study of the organ systems of the human body, their structure and integration. Laboratory includes examination of mammalian organs.
4

Prerequisites

BIO 110 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

BIO 345 Comparative Vertebrate Morphogenesis

(3 lecture 3 laboratory) Study of comparative developmental processes of vertebrates as they relate to the structure of the adult organ systems. Developmental anatomy and adult morphology of sharks through mammals are studied and dissected.
4

Prerequisites

(BIO 110 and BIO 111 with a minimum grade of D-)

BIO 350 Human Physiology

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Examine in detail the function of the organ systems of the human body, especially of those involved with the maintenance of normal function.
4

Prerequisites

BIO 210 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

BIO 351 Microbiology

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Examine microorganisms and their interactions with living and non-living components of the biosphere. Study the structural and metabolic diversity within Eubacteria and Archaea, some fungi and viruses.
4

Prerequisites

(BIO 110 with a minimum grade of D-) and (CHEM 281 or CHEM 331L or CHEM 331 or CHEM 231 or CHEM 281L with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

BIO 354 General Plant Physiology

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Study of physiological factors influencing the chemical and structural composition of plant absorption and utilization of water and minerals; photosynthesis, translocation, respiration, nitrogen metabolism; and growth and development.
4

Prerequisites

(BIO 111 with a minimum grade of D-) and (CHEM 281L or CHEM 331L or CHEM 231 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

BIO 360 Ecology

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Identify/describe plant and animal communities. Study of ecosystem structure and energy flow. Examine topics such as biogeochemical cycles, soils, population structure, species' interactions and succession. Field trip may be required.
4

Prerequisites

BIO 111 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Course Fee Required and Participation Fee Required

BIO 362 Principles of Animal Behavior

Study of the behaviors of animals. Topics include: mechanisms that generate behavior, the development of behavior, behavioral adaptations for survival, behavioral adaptations for mating, and the evolution of behavior.

3

Prerequisites

(BIO 111 or ANT 130 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Fee

Participation Fee Required

BIO 363 Principles of Animal Behavior Laboratory

Laboratory-based investigation of animal behavior. Class will include hands-on activities and experimentation. Must be taken concurrently with BIO 362.

1

Prerequisites

(ANT 130 or BIO 111 with a minimum grade of D-)

Corequisites

BIO 362

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

BIO 365 Advanced Life Science Concepts

(2 lecture, 2 laboratory) Examination of biological principles of organisms and ecosystems and crosscutting concepts in the sciences. The course is designed for elementary educators and connects content with state and national standards.
3

Prerequisites

SCI 266 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

BIO 381 Principles of Immunology

An introduction to the components and basic mechanisms of the immune system.
3

Prerequisites

BIO 220 with a minimum grade of D-

BIO 408 Workshop

A variety of workshops on special topics within the discipline. Goals and objectives will emphasize the acquisition of general knowledge and skills in the discipline. S/U graded.
1- 3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

BIO 411 Field Techniques in Biology

(1 Lecture, 1 Laboratory) The most common field techniques for both plant and animal biology, focusing on biodiversity.
2

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

BIO 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 3

Special Notes

Please note while there is no limit on total credits, this course is only repeatable for a maximum of six credits per semester (concurrent enrollment of two times).

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

BIO 425 Molecular Genetics

Examination of protein synthesis, DNA replication, gene expression, gene structure, and regulation of gene expression.
3

Prerequisites

BIO 220 with a minimum grade of D-

BIO 438 Ornithology

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Study of the evolution, general biology, diversity, ecology and behaviors of birds. Laboratory emphasis will be on identification. Field trips required.
4

Prerequisites

BIO 111 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Course Fee Required and Participation Fee Required

BIO 442 Molecular and Cellular Laboratory

(2 Laboratory) Study of the theory and techniques currently used to investigate cells and molecules. Development of the laboratory and problem solving skills to successfully conduct experiments.
2

Prerequisites

(BIO 220 with a minimum grade of D-) and (Concurrent Prerequisite BIO 425 or Concurrent Prerequisite BIO 450 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

BIO 448 Pathobiology

Causes and mechanisms of disease at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels. Cellular homeostasis and adaptive mechanisms, histopathology, toxins/toxicants, infectious disease, senescence, and target tissues.
3

Prerequisites

(BIO 220 and BIO 341 and BIO 350 with a minimum grade of D-)

BIO 450 Cell Physiology

Study of the structural and functional relationships among biological macromolecules, cell organelles, and cell processes.
3

Prerequisites

(BIO 220 with a minimum grade of D-) and (CHEM 231 or CHEM 331 with a minimum grade of D-)

BIO 455 Introductory Biology Curriculum and Instruction

Study of assessment, curriculum development, and learner-centered pedagogical approaches. Students taking this course will serve as undergraduate teaching assistants for BIO 110 (via BIO 494)
2

Prerequisites

BIO 110 with a minimum grade of D-

Corequisites

BIO 494

BIO 462 Conservation Biology

Examination of the fundamental principles of conservation biology (biodiversity, habitat degradation, extinction, restoration, planning) with discussion of current topics (climate change, single species conservation, conservation genetics, landscape vs ecosystem conservation, sustainable development).
3

Prerequisites

BIO 111 with a minimum grade of D-

BIO 465 Evolution

History of evolutionary thought, evolution as a population genetics process, and reconstruction of evolutionary history using phylogenetic methodology.
3

Prerequisites

BIO 220 with a minimum grade of D-

BIO 466 Animal Physiological Ecology

Study of animal function and how environmental conditions influence the physiology of animals. Emphasis will be on vertebrate systems but invertebrates will be included.
3

Prerequisites

(BIO 110 and BIO 360 with a minimum grade of D-)

BIO 468 Disturbance Ecology

Study of disturbance effects on ecosystem structure and function.
3

Prerequisites

(BIO 110 and BIO 360 with a minimum grade of D-)

BIO 476 Pharmacology

Cell biology and/or biochemistry recommended. A mechanistic study of pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of drugs) and pharmaco dynamics (drug actions and interactions). Examples of important bioactive chemicals will be discussed.

3

Prerequisites

(BIO 220 with a minimum grade of D-) and (BIO 246 or BIO 350 or BIO 552 with a minimum grade of D-)

BIO 481 Introduction to Neurobiology

The molecular, cellular, and anatomical principles and network properties of the nervous system will be studied, with a focus on human biomedical applications.
3

Prerequisites

BIO 350 with a minimum grade of D-

BIO 491 Seminar in Biological Sciences

Invited speakers will present topics in content biology and biology education. Graduate students will also present final defenses of their theses or dissertations.
1

Special Notes

Please note only 1 credit will count toward upper division BIO electives.

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

BIO 492 Internship in Biological Sciences

On-the-job experience in professional areas under the supervision of an area specialist. S/U graded.
1- 3

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

BIO 493 Clinical Internship in Biological Sciences

On the job experience in a clinical setting under the supervision of an area specialist. A minimum of 37.5 hours of contact work is required per credit hour. S/U graded.
1- 3

Prerequisites

BIO 220 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

BIO 494 Practicum in College Biological Science Instruction

Gain experience assisting in teaching an introductory biological science laboratory.
1- 2

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 2 times

BIO 495 Special Topics in Biology

Advanced study for qualified undergraduates in an area of the biological sciences.
1- 3

Special Notes

Prerequisites vary depending on the title and subject being offered.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

BREW 170 Fundamentals of Brewing Science

Fundamental role of science in brewing beer, the ingredients in beer, and the process of brewing. Emphasis on QA/QC analysis and integration of beer throughout society. For non-science majors.
3

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and GT Physical & Life Sciences

BREW 170L Fundamentals of Brewing Science Laboratory

Investigation of science in the brewing industry through hands-on activities in the laboratory. Credit toward Liberal Arts Core given only upon successful completion of BREW 170.
1

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite BREW 170 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and LCLB-Science Lab Course and GT Physical & Life Science

BREW 320 Sensory Analysis of Beer

(0.5 lecture, 1 lab) Introduction, discussions, methods and applications of various topics in the sensory evaluation of beer styles and common off-flavors present during the brewing process.

1

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

BREW 370 Introduction to Brewing Science

Survey of beer brewing, with a particular focus on the multidisciplinary connections in the science of brewing beer. Specific topics include the history, biology, chemistry, physics, and politics of beer.
3

BREW 470 Practical Brewing Science

Must be 21 + years old (photo ID required at first class session). Investigations in brewing beer with focus on practical applications of water chemistry, analysis of beer components, sensory evaluation. A project-based component stressing the multidisciplinary nature of brewing is required.
3

Prerequisites

BREW 370 with a minimum grade of C

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

BREW 471 Fermentation in Brewing

Study of fermentation in beer brewing from the biochemical, technical, and practical aspects. Focus on metabolism, methods that influence metabolism, and chemical analyses that evaluation fermentation.

3

Prerequisites

BREW 370 with a minimum grade of D-

BREW 479 Advanced Brewing Science

Students must be 21+ years old (photo ID required at first class session). Application of brewing laboratory science methods of malt, wort, and beer analysis during the production of microbrewery scale quantities of beer. A project-based component involving the creation of a quality assurance program for the operation of a microbrewery is required.
3

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite BREW 470 with a minimum grade of C

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

BREW 492 Internship

On-the-job experience in the brewing industry under the supervision of an area specialist.

1-9

Special Notes

Consent of instructor required.

BREW 495 Special Topics in Brewing Laboratory Science

Study of special topics in brewing and brewing laboratory science. Variable topics.

1-3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

CHEM 101 Chemistry for Citizens

No previous chemistry required. Develops the fundamental role chemistry plays in daily life and an understanding of scientific and technological issues affecting society.
3

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and GT Physical & Life Sciences

CHEM 102 Chemistry for Citizens Laboratory

(3 laboratory) Investigation of the chemical world through hands-on activities in the laboratory. Credit toward Liberal Arts Core given only upon successful completion of CHEM 101.
1

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 101 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and LCLB-Science Lab Course and GT Physical & Life Science

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

CHEM 103 Introductory Chemistry

No credit for chemistry major or minor. Basic chemistry concepts to prepare those with no chemistry background for CHEM 111 or CHEM 281.
3

CHEM 103L Introductory Chemistry Laboratory

Investigation of chemistry concepts, emphasizing their application to everyday life. Designed to build a conceptual foundation of chemistry and develop basic chemistry laboratory skills.
1

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 103 with a minimum grade of D-

CHEM 111 Principles of Chemistry I

Atomic theory, mole concept, stoichiometry, states of matter, formulas, nomenclature, periodicity, bonding and solutions.

4

Prerequisites

(ACT Math with a minimum score of 19 or SAT Math Section with a minimum score of 500 or SAT Mathematics with a minimum score of 460 or ALEKS Test Score with a minimum score of 040) and (Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 111L with a minimum grade of C)

Special Notes

For SAT Mathematics before 2016, the minimum score of 460 is acceptable. Students scoring between 30-39 on ALEKS MATH test must co-register MATH 124/127 along with CHEM 111, or take CHEM 103 prior to CHEM 111. Students scoring below 30 on ALEKS MATH test must take CHEM 103 or MATH 124/127 as prerequisite. Please consult the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry for more information.

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and GT Physical & Life Science

CHEM 111L Principles of Chemistry I Laboratory

(3 laboratory) Laboratory to accompany CHEM 111.
1

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 111 with a minimum grade of C

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and LCLB-Science Lab Course and GT Physical & Life Science

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

CHEM 112 Principles of Chemistry II

Thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, qualitative analysis, electrochemistry and descriptive inorganic chemistry.
4

Prerequisites

(CHEM 111 and CHEM 111L and Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 112L with a minimum grade of C)

CHEM 112L Principles of Chemistry II Laboratory

(3 laboratory)Laboratory to accompany CHEM 112.
1

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 112 with a minimum grade of C

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

CHEM 231 Principles of Organic Chemistry

An introduction to organic chemistry. Structure, nomenclature, reactions and uses of organic compounds and their relationship to foods and nutrition.
3

Prerequisites

(CHEM 111 and CHEM 111L with a minimum grade of C)

CHEM 281 Fundamentals of Biochemistry

(3 lecture, 1 recitation) Structure and function of biologically relevant molecules, metabolism and regulation of metabolism.
3

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 281L with a minimum grade of C

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and GT Physical & Life Sciences

CHEM 281L Fundamentals of Biochemistry Laboratory

(3 laboratory) Laboratory to accompany CHEM 281.
1

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 281 with a minimum grade of C

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and LCLB-Science Lab Course and GT Physical & Life Science

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

CHEM 321 Chemical Analysis

(2.5 lecture, 4.5 laboratory) Chemical methods of analysis including gravimetry, acid-base, redox methods, statistics in analytical chemistry and an introduction to instrument operations.
4

Prerequisites

(CHEM 112 or CHEM 112L with a minimum grade of C)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

CHEM 331 Organic Chemistry I

Nomenclature, reactions and synthesis of organic compounds.
4

Prerequisites

(CHEM 112 and CHEM 112L and Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 331L with a minimum grade of C)

CHEM 331L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

(3 laboratory) Laboratory to accompany CHEM 331.
1

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 331 with a minimum grade of C

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

CHEM 332 Organic Chemistry II

Advanced concepts in synthesis, theories of reactions, biological molecules and spectroscopy.
4

Prerequisites

(CHEM 331 and CHEM 331L and Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 332L with a minimum grade of C)

CHEM 332L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

(3 laboratory) Laboratory to accompany CHEM 332.
1

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 332 with a minimum grade of C

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

CHEM 360 Environmental Chemistry

(1.5 lecture, 1.5 laboratory) The effect of chemicals in the environment.
2

Prerequisites

(CHEM 331 and CHEM 331L with a minimum grade of C)

CHEM 381 Principles of Biochemistry

A survey of the structure, function, and metabolism of biomolecules.
3

Prerequisites

(CHEM 231 with a minimum grade of C or (CHEM 332 and CHEM 332L with a minimum grade of C)) and (Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 381L)

CHEM 381L Principles of Biochemistry Lab

(3 laboratory) Laboratory to accompany CHEM 381.
1

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 381 with a minimum grade of C

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

CHEM 395 Special Topics in Chemistry

Advanced study of variable topics within the field of Chemistry.
1- 3

Prerequisites

CHEM 370 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

CHEM 421 Instrumental Analysis

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Theory, practice, and application of modern analytical instrumentation.
4

Prerequisites

CHEM 321 with a minimum grade of C

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

CHEM 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 3

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

CHEM 425 Forensic Chemistry

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Application of statistics and chemistry to the analysis of evidence gathered in criminal investigations such as drugs, fibers, gun shot residue, explosives, and accelerants.
4

Prerequisites

(CHEM 332 and CHEM 321 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

CHEM 441 Inorganic Chemistry I

First of two related courses. Fundamentals of bonding and structure of inorganic substances. Integration of appropriate physical methods with theory and practice.
3

Prerequisites

(CHEM 332 and CHEM 332L with a minimum grade of C)

CHEM 442 Inorganic Chemistry II

A continuation of CHEM 441. Covers fundamental topics in solid-state, orgnaometallic and bioinorganic chemistry.
3

Prerequisites

CHEM 441 with a minimum grade of C

CHEM 443 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

(3 laboratory) Experimentation including structures, bonding, syntheses and properties of inorganic substances.
1

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 441 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

CHEM 450 Survey of Physical Chemistry

One semester survey of physical chemistry (thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and quantum mechanics). Not applicable to the professional and biochemistry emphasis areas in chemistry.
3

Prerequisites

(CHEM 321 with a minimum grade of C) and (MATH 131 with a minimum grade of D-) and (PHYS 221 with a minimum grade of D-) and (CHEM 332 with a minimum grade of C) and (Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 450L with a minimum grade of C)

CHEM 450L Survey of Physical Chemistry Laboratory

(3 laboratory) Laboratory to accompany CHEM 450.
1

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 450 with a minimum grade of C

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

CHEM 451 Physical Chemistry I

Chemical kinetics, quantum theory of atoms and molecules, and statistical thermodynamics.
4

Prerequisites

(MATH 233 with a minimum grade of D-) and (PHYS 241 with a minimum grade of D-) and (CHEM 332 with a minimum grade of C) and (CHEM 332L with a minimum grade of C) and (Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 321 with a minimum grade of C) and (Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 451L with a minimum grade of C)

CHEM 451L Physical Chemistry I Laboratory

(3 laboratory) Laboratory to accompany CHEM 451.
1

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 451 with a minimum grade of C

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

CHEM 452 Physical Chemistry II

The properties of matter, thermodynamics, thermochemistry and kinetic molecular theory.
4

Prerequisites

(MATH 233 with a minimum grade of D-) and (PHYS 241 with a minimum grade of D-) and (CHEM 332 with a minimum grade of C) and (Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 321 with a minimum grade of C) and (Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 452L with a minimum grade of C)

CHEM 452L Physical Chemistry II Laboratory

(3 laboratory) Laboratory to accompany CHEM 452.
1

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 452 with a minimum grade of C

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

CHEM 481 General Biochemistry I

Chemistry of biologically important compounds (proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids), emphasizing structure and function, methods of isolation, identification and characterization, kinetics and mechanisms of enzyme catalysis.
3

Prerequisites

(CHEM 332 and CHEM 332L with a minimum grade of C)

CHEM 481L Experimental Biochemistry I

(3 laboratory) Techniques involved in the isolation and characterization of amino acids, peptides and proteins. Isolation and kinetics of enzymes.
1

Prerequisites

(CHEM 321 and CHEM 481 with a minimum grade of C)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

CHEM 482 General Biochemistry II

Bioenergetics, electron transport systems, metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, nucleotides and amino acids.

3

Prerequisites

(CHEM 481 and Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 482L with a minimum grade of C)

CHEM 482L Experimental Biochemistry II

(3 laboratory) Techniques involved in the isolation and characterization of lipids and metabolism.

1

Prerequisites

(CHEM 481 and CHEM 481L and Concurrent Prerequisite CHEM 482 with a minimum grade of C)

CHEM 499 Seminar and Research in Chemistry

Introduction to chemical research and current chemical literature; initiate and pursue investigation of a specific topic in chemistry or chemical education. Oral and written reports are required.
1- 3

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

CHIN 101 Elementary Chinese I

Emphasis on elementary oral/aural skills through conversational exchanges in Mandarin Chinese relating to everyday culture. For students with little or no prior knowledge of Chinese.
5

Course Attribute

LC7-International Studies

CHIN 102 Elementary Chinese II

Oral/aural skills in Mandarin Chinese are coupled with writing and character recognition related to practical knowledge of everyday culture.
5

Prerequisites

CHIN 101 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

LC7-International Studies

CHIN 107 Conversational Chinese for Beginners

Introductory course in basic Mandarin Chinese oral communication in familiar, everyday contexts. Focus on listening and speaking, some character recognition, writing. For learners with limited or no prior Chinese language experience.

3

CHIN 116 Introduction to Chinese Civilization

Become familiar with the culture and society of Modern China through an interdisciplinary examination of China's past. Conducted in English.

3

Course Attribute

LC5c-Hum Behav & Social Sys and and SS3-GT Human Behavior $ Soc Sys and LC7-International Studies

CHIN 201 Intermediate Chinese I

Review language structure and develop reading and writing skills. Gain vocabulary through conversational practice on topics of cultural and literary interest.
3

Prerequisites

CHIN 102 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

LC3d-World Languages and LC7-International Studies and GT Foreign Languages

CHIN 202 Intermediate Chinese II

Review language structure and develop reading and writing skills. Gain vocabulary through conversational practice on topics of cultural and literary interest.
3

Prerequisites

CHIN 201 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

LC3d-World Languages and LC7-International Studies and GT Foreign Languages

CHIN 216 Masterpieces in Chinese Literature

Study major works in Chinese literature, become familiar with different genres and major writers of Chinese literary tradition, and situate the literature within its social and historical contexts.

3

Course Attribute

LC3b-Literature & Humanities and GT Literature and LC7-International Studies

CHIN 301 China and the Chinese

Develop advanced language skills in Chinese using a variety of authentic texts. Practice writing and conversation.
3

Prerequisites

CHIN 202 with a minimum grade of D-

CHIN 302 China and the Chinese II

Acquire advanced skills in Chinese using authentic texts and media. Learn composition and advanced conversation.
3

Prerequisites

CHIN 301 with a minimum grade of D-

CHIN 311 Introduction to Literary Chinese

Develop skills to read and translate texts using literary Chinese. Become familiar with traditional Chinese civilization. Taught in Chinese and English.
3

Prerequisites

CHIN 202 with a minimum grade of D-

CHIN 313 Chinese Cinema

View, analyze, discuss Chinese language films, learn specialized vocabulary, develop language skills and gain cultural and historical understanding of film in the Chinese speaking world.
3

Prerequisites

CHIN 202 with a minimum grade of D-

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 1 times

CHIN 395 Topics in Modern China

Study thematically related topics of the modern Chinese-speaking world. Subjects include identity, politics, Chinese Diaspora and immigration/emigration, history, and Chinese society through film, literature, historical and cultural texts.
3

Prerequisites

CHIN 201 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

CHIN 407 Chinese for Oral Proficiency

This course develops oral proficiency by exposing students to linguistic functions categorized as intermediate-high and advanced by ACTFL proficiency guidelines. This course prepares students for the oral proficiency interview.
3

Prerequisites

CHIN 202 with a minimum grade of D-

CHIN 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 4

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 8 credit hours

CHIN 450 Modern Chinese Literature

Read, analyze, and discuss Chinese literature from 1919 to the present; situate literature in cultural, social and historical events; acquire skills to write critical analyses.
3

Prerequisites

CHIN 202 with a minimum grade of D-

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

CHIN 495 Topics in Traditional China

Study thematically related topics in traditional China (pre-1900). Read literary, historical, religious, and philosophical texts in literary Chinese. Become familiar with primary sources and acquire skills to conduct research.
3

Prerequisites

CHIN 311 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

CIE 010 Low-Basic Speaking & Listening

This class introduces students to conversation strategies to enable oral communication about familiar topics, introduces listening strategies to understand information presented in dialogues and to follow basic instructions. Strategies to improve pronunciation are also introduced.
2

CIE 011 Low-Basic Writing

This course’s primary focus is the structure of a sentence. Students learn the parts of a sentence and practice writing at that level. Capitalization rules and the rules of end punctuation are also introduced and practiced.
2

CIE 013 Low-Basic Grammar

The primary focus of this course is understanding basic English grammar beginning with the verb form of "be" in the present and past tenses. In addition, students will be introduced to the uses of the simple present tense as well as to personal pronouns, possessives and adjectives.
2

CIE 014 Low-Basic Reading & Vocabulary

In this course, students are introduced to reading through the study of phonics. In addition, basic strategies for decoding words and recognizing parts of speech are introduced.
2

CIE 015 Fundamentals of Formatting

This course is a part of a skills based Intensive English program designed to help students prepare for academic success when they enter the university system. The primary focus of this course is to guide students through the complexities of applying both the rhetorical and the technical components of a variety of formats used in a variety of disciplines for both undergraduate and graduate students.
1

CIE 020 High-Basic Speaking & Listening

This class continues and expands basic conversation strategies. Students learn strategies for eliciting details and prolonging conversations. The information presented in recorded dialogues becomes more detailed and complex. Strategies to improve specific pronunciation errors are introduced.
2

CIE 021 High-Basic Writing

This course continues to work at the sentence level, introducing compound sentences to the students. Students are also introduced to paragraph writing and practice producing the components of an academic paragraph: a topic sentence, supporting sentence, and a concluding sentence.
2

CIE 023 High-Basic Grammar

The primary focus of this class is the introduction of the present simple and progressive tenses, as well as the simple past of regular and irregular verbs, and the introduction of count and non-count nouns. Additionally, this course is designed to reinforce the simple sentence structure for the students to be able to discuss/write about everyday events: school, shopping, leisure etc.
2

CIE 024 High-Basic Reading & Vocabulary

In this course, students will complete their study of phonics and read simple fiction and non-fiction texts. They will be introduced to the reading strategies such as predicting and scanning.
2

CIE 025 English Pronunciation

This course is for low-advanced and advanced students in the IEP who would like to improve their phonetic and pronunciational (oral fluency) skills in English. Students will be trained to readjust their speech organs in order to minimize the influence of their native language sound system and improve their ability to distinguish and produce English sounds. Additionally, students will work on their oral fluency in English. Therefore, students will be introduced to articulatory and auditory phonetics in their applied forms.
1

CIE 030 Low-Intermediate Speaking & Listening

This course introduces the listening and speaking skills needed to succeed at an American university. Areas covered include pronunciation and fluency, critical thinking and listening strategies, in class and lecture note taking, class discussion and presentations, and vocabulary building.
2

CIE 031 Low-Intermediate Writing

This course focuses on writing effective academic paragraphs. Students learn the distinction between informal and academic writing, academic paragraph format and organization, and essential steps of the writing process. Students also learn to produce paragraphs in the rhetorical styles of narration, description, and process (and possibly opinion or example if time permits). Students will be introduced to the concepts of logical division of ideas, coherence, and transition signals. Students are expected to demonstrate improvement in spelling and vocabulary, punctuation, and grammar.
2

CIE 033 Low-Intermediate Grammar

Students will show competency in the use of the present and past, including progressive forms of these tenses as well as recognize the use of the simple future tense. In addition, basic modal verbs are introduced to practice expressions related to possibility, ability, and asking for permission.
2

CIE 034 Low-Intermediate Reading & Vocabulary

This course introduces the reading skills and vocabulary needed to succeed at an American university. Areas covered include developing vocabulary skills; identifying and using critical thinking, reading and vocabulary strategies; using rapid reading practices; and applying all strategies and vocabulary to reading comprehension and independent reading.
2

CIE 040 High-Intermediate Speaking & Listening

In this class, students continue to develop the skills and strategies needed for academic success. Students prepare several presentations and practice their discussion skills. Development of note-taking strategies remains a focus of this course. Proper intonation and stress skills when speaking are practiced.
2

CIE 041 High-Intermediate Writing

This course focuses on writing effective academic paragraphs. Students learn the distinction between informal and academic writing, academic paragraph format and organization, and essential steps of the writing process. Students also learn to produce paragraphs in the rhetorical styles of narration, description, and process (and possibly opinion or example if time permits). Students will be introduced to the concepts of logical division of ideas, coherence, and transition signals. Students are expected to demonstrate improvement in spelling and vocabulary, punctuation, and grammar.
2

CIE 043 High-Intermediate Grammar

This class introduces the uses of the present perfect as well as the more advanced comparative aspects of adjectives and adverbs. Gerunds and infinitives as well as nouns, quantifiers and articles are also studied.
2

CIE 044 High-Intermediate Reading & Vocabulary

This course builds and increases academic reading skills that are most useful for university students. It includes significant amounts of reading, and increasing variety of text types, academic vocabulary, and academic subject matter.
2

CIE 050 Low-Advanced Speaking & Listening

In this class, students will continue to develop the skills to succeed in academic settings. Formal and informal presentations, discussion participation and leadership, and offering and defending opinions on relevant topics form the core of this course. Note-taking skills are further polished while pronunciation skills continue to be developed.
2

CIE 051 Low-Advanced Writing

This course’s primary focus is continued practice writing an academic five-paragraph essay. It is also an introduction to writing academic research summaries and employing paraphrasing and quotations within the summary.
2

CIE 053 Low-Advanced Grammar

The primary focus of this course is to review and expand present and past and future tense forms. In addition students will be introduced to indirect speech and embedded questions.
2

CIE 054 Low-Advanced Reading & Vocabulary

In this course, students will improve their ability to effectively comprehend academic texts. They will demonstrate a variety of predicting and reading strategies.
2

CIE 055 Academic Vocabulary

This course is designed to improve academic vocabulary using the Academic Word List through reading, writing, listening and speaking exercises. It was developed to help college level students learn the vocabulary and the learning strategies needed to succeed in university level coursework.
1

CIE 060 High-Advanced Speaking & Listening

This course introduces students to authentic speech from professional presentations and formal debates. Students will learn the pragmatic strategies to communicate effectively in class discussions while differentiation between neutral formal and informal registers. Furthermore, students will learn to approach their study of English vocabulary through a multitude of strategies that include: manipulating morphemes to form various forms of vocabulary words, studying grammatical and syntactic structures which are used to form sentences with the target vocabulary words, and finally using the Corpus of Contemporary American English to use target vocabulary words in natural spoken and written text. Lastly, students will build presentation skills by delivering both impromptu and formal researched presentations in collaboration with their peers.
2

CIE 061 High-Advanced Writing

At the completion of this course, students will be able to identify the steps of the writing process and specific skills used to produce academic essays, which include supporting information in the form of quotations, summary, response, and paraphrase. Students will also become acquainted with integrating this information to construct a college level paper. Students will become familiar with the rules of in-text citation and correct citation of sources, and basic APA format requirements. As part of this course, students will develop awareness about academic journal articles, locating them in the library, and becoming familiar with the separate sections of these kinds of articles. They will continue to expand their academic vocabulary as well as to improve their revision and editing skills. This course's primary focus is to produce as academic essay using the rhetorical pattern of argumentation, including planning, researching, writing and revising.
2

CIE 063 High-Advanced Grammar

This course is a part of a skills based Intensive English program designed to help students prepare for academic success when they enter the university system. The primary focus of this course is the use of conditionals and adjective clauses. The use of modal verbs and the passive is reviewed.
2

CIE 064 High-Advanced Reading & Vocabulary

This course actively involves students, through a combination of group work and individual assignments, in their continued development of the reading and vocabulary skills needed to succeed at an American university. The reading material includes a variety of academic and journalistic materials, utilizing a variety of strategies for further comprehension. The texts include academic, fiction and non-fiction.
2

CIE 065 Business English

Assist students in transitioning from Intensive English to classes in their major field. Providing additional practice in using English in applied settings to help students be more successful as they begin studies in their major field. Strengthen grammar and punctuation skills in applied tasks for business situations.
1

CIE 070 Graduate Oral Presentation

This course is for advanced students of English who need to work on using academic vocabulary, pronunciation and high-level presentation skills. Students will demonstrate competency in their ability to compile and present research-based information in oral presentations. Students will identify and improve pronunciation errors, thing critically, and use high-level academic vocabulary.
2

CIE 071 Graduate Research Writing

This course focuses upon writing an effective academic research paper. Students will learn to follow appropriate research format and will produce a final paper containing convincing academic research. Students will also be introduced to the specificity of the language used in scientific studies/ research papers.
2

CIE 095 Academic Vocabulary II

This course is for Advanced level Intensive English students and its purpose is to give international students exposure and explicit instruction with high-level academic vocabulary from a variety of subject areas including Education, Computer Information Systems, and Psychology.
1

CIE 101 Introduction to American Higher Education

Study topics relevant to new international students’ transition into the academic community of critical thinking and problem solving skills. Emphasis on learning groups, communication skills, campus culture and overall personal and academic integration.
1

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 1 times

COMM 100 Basics of Public Speaking

Overview of concepts central to effective public speaking including managing nervousness, researching and organizing information, thinking critically, delivering messages, fielding questions and influencing an audience.
1

Corequisites

COMM 101

Course Attribute

Liberal Arts Core Elective

COMM 101 Speaking Evaluation

Evaluation of basic concepts central to effective speaking, listening, responding and critical thinking in an oral context.
2

Corequisites

COMM 100

Course Attribute

Liberal Arts Core Elective

COMM 102 Introduction to Communication

An introduction to the nature of communication as symbolic behavior including an overview of communication contexts.
3

COMM 201 Inquiry in Communication

An introduction to communication inquiry; includes practice with skills of critical thinking, library research and social science techniques.
3

COMM 211 Argumentation and Debate

Study the basics of argumentation including reasoning, evidence and critical thinking. Practice the practical skills of public debating.
3

COMM 212 Professional Speaking

Practical experience in presentation design and delivery to facilitate understanding of a message and for influence of others.
3

Prerequisites

(COMM 100 and COMM 101 with a minimum grade of D-)

COMM 220 Interpersonal Communication

An undergraduate course focusing on the philosophical and theoretical issues of self-perception and relationships as they are affected by verbal and nonverbal communication.
3

COMM 221 Nonverbal Communication

An overview of current theory and research in communication. The course will focus on nonverbal communication message systems and their impact on the communication process.
3

COMM 223 Intercultural Communication

Learn about the communication concepts and theories inherent in the process of interacting with individuals in cross-cultural and inter-ethnic situations.
3

Course Attribute

LC7-International Studies

COMM 261 Seminar in Communication

Investigate introductory issues of current concern for COMM professionals with subject varied according to faculty expertise.
1- 3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

COMM 324 Family Communication

Investigate family structure from a human communication perspective.
3

COMM 330 Small Group Communication

Apply problem-solving and decision making techniques and theories, particularly in the relationship between communication and group variables such as leadership roles and cohesiveness.
3

COMM 331 Organizational Communication

Study the dynamics of communication activities within an organization.
3

COMM 341 Courtroom Communication

Investigate the relationship between communication and the law and legal argumentation and persuasion within courtroom advocacy. Analyze communication within the legal profession.
3

COMM 343 Persuasion

Investigate major variables surrounding attitude change and human persuasion.
3

COMM 350 Communication in the Classroom

Investigate communication theory and research related specifically to the classroom setting. Course content will focus on the development of self concept perception, verbal and nonverbal language and group dynamics.
3

Prerequisites

COMM 201 with a minimum grade of D-

COMM 410 Communication & Technology

This course is designed to introduce the concepts, theories, and issues surrounding the emergence of communication technologies and the evolution of the communication process.
3

COMM 422 Directed Study

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 3

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

COMM 431 Communication and Leadership

Examine theories of leadership, major leadership research findings and various leadership methods. Consider how the principles derived from leadership literature can be applied to small group and organizational settings.
3

COMM 461 Seminar in Communication

Investigate issues of current concern for COMM professionals with subject varied according to faculty expertise.
1- 3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

COMM 491 Communication Theory Capstone

Summative course of the nature and function of communication theory and research including an overview of the traditions of theory and current perspectives in the discipline.
3

Prerequisites

(COMM 100 and COMM 101 and COMM 102 and COMM 201 and COMM 220 and COMM 330 and COMM 343 with a minimum grade of D-)

COMM 492 Undergraduate Internship

Supervised work experience in area of specialization. Submit a proposal to the coordinator of internships six weeks before registration. Maximum of six semester credit hours may be counted toward the major.
1-10

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 10 credit hours

CRJ 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice

Survey of the three components of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. Emphasis on the structural and situational factors influencing the way these agencies of social control operate.
3

Course Attribute

LC5c-Hum Behav & Social Sys and GT Human Behavior & Soc Sys

CRJ 220 Policing Systems

Introduces the philosophy and techniques of policing including the history, traditions, and social developments resulting in present systems. Focus on the nature of police work, police discretion, and community relations.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 230 Judicial Process

A study of the American judicial system with emphasis on its structure, function, and process. Focus on the role, function, and behavior of prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges and jurors.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 240 Correctional Systems

Analysis and evaluation of contemporary institutional and community correctional systems including jails, prisons, probation, parole, and alternative sanctioning. Examines punishment justifications and reviews correctional practices for juvenile and adult offenders.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 260 Introduction to Crime Theories

Presents an overview of historical and modern theories used to explain criminal behavior, how theories of crime are measured, and empirical support for various criminological theories.
3

CRJ 310 White Collar Crime

Introduction to various topics and issues relating to white-collar crime. Theories, measurements, and prevention strategies of white-collar, organizational, occupational, workplace, and environmental crimes will be presented and compared.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 312 Crime Prevention

This class provides an overview of policy formation and evaluates what works in various crime and delinquency prevention policies and programs.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 315 Drugs & Crime

Explores drug laws and their efforts, theoretical links between drugs and crime, legal and illegal drugs, drug offenders, and the criminal justice system and other responses to drugs and crime.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 317 Cybercrime

An examination of the criminal justice system’s experience with cybercrimes. Explore the emergence of cybercriminality since the widespread use of the "information highway." Examine how the Internet has allowed for an explosion of criminal behavior and an influx of new offenders on our criminal justice system.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 324 Crime Mapping

Provides the student with hands on experience in the use of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to analyze organization operations, crime statistics, and crime patterns.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: CRJ 324 and GEOG 324

CRJ 325 Problem-Oriented Policing

In-depth examination of the relationship between policing and social problems by focusing on the fundamental theories of crime and identifying and analyzing crime from a law enforcement perspective.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 332 The Sentencing Process

Examine the sentencing process including the role that judges and the courtroom work group plays in sentencing. Examine disparities that exist within sentencing and policies that may lessen this disparity.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 335 Juvenile Justice

Focus on the juvenile justice system that responds to criminal acts committed by minors, as well as theories that attempt to explain the development of law-breaking behaviors in this population.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 350 Victim Studies

Examine the emerging discipline of victimology, including the history of victim services, its place in the criminal justice system, and its role in addressing the needs of those victimized by criminal activity.
3

Prerequisites

(CRJ 110 and CRJ 220 and CRJ 230 with a minimum grade of C)

CRJ 352 Domestic Violence Victims & Offenders

Examines the phenomenon of family violence from the perspective of victims, offenders, and children. Focus on safety concerns for victims and criminal justice system response to victims and offenders.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 354 Restorative Justice

Focus on the evolution of the use of restorative justice theories and practices within the criminal justice system and situations that require conflict resolution, within the United States and internationally.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 360 Theories of Crime

Examine major types of crime in the context of theories of crime and criminal behavior. Explain and critique current social responses to crime and policies of crime control.
3

Prerequisites

(CRJ 110 and CRJ 260 with a minimum grade of C)

CRJ 362 Criminal Behavior Analysis

Use inductive and deductive reasoning in understanding violent crime scenes and in establishing suspect profiles. Emphasis on assessing an offender's 'signature', modus operandi and motives.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 380 Research Methods in Criminal Justice

Study of methods for conducting research, collecting data, and analyzing data encountered in criminal justice. Emphasis on questions inherent to the study of contemporary issues in criminal justice.

3

Prerequisites

(CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C) and (Concurrent Prerequisite LIB 160 with a minimum grade of C) and (Completion of LC2-Mathematics course)

Special Notes

Must earn a minimum grade of "C" or better (C- is not acceptable) in LIB 160 and CRJ 110. MATH 120 is suggested for the LAC Mathematics course.

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

CRJ 395 Topics in Criminal Justice

Offerings under this heading focus on criminal justice topics not regularly offered in the department. Topics could include capital punishment, community policing, minorities in the justice system, etc.
1- 3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

CRJ 402 Death Investigation

In an intense format, this course provides the student with a series of lectures describing the manner and cause of death. Accidental, suicide, homicide and natural death will be examined.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 403 Crime Scene Investigation

In an intense format, this course provides students with lectures and lab exercise practicums for documenting crime scenes, identifying and collecting evidence, and processing crime scenes.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 404 Evidentiary Photography

In an intense format, this course provides the principles of photography and complimentary crime scene documentation techniques as applied to criminal investigation using digital photography.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 405 Bloodstain Pattern Analysis

In an intense format, students examine bloodstain pattern evidence. Course includes laboratory experimentation of blood flight characteristics of motion and force for reconstructing a sequence of events and post-crime activities.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 408 Workshop

Workshops on special topics related to issues associated with, or in professional preparation for, criminal justice. Goals and objectives will emphasize the acquisition of knowledge and skills in the discipline.
1- 3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

CRJ 410 Comparative Justice Systems

Examine criminal justice in countries around the world. Compare those systems with the justice system in the United States. Attention on agencies and procedures for law enforcement, adjudication, and correction.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Criminal Justice (and) Criminology & Criminal Justice Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior

CRJ 415 Homeland Security

Overview of the missions, goals, structures, functions, and roles associated with providing homeland security in the U.S. Studies the challenges faced by homeland security now and in the future.
3

CRJ 417 Terrorism in the 21st Century

This course covers historical and contemporary issues of terrorism and how it has shaped lives in the 21st century. It emphasizes effects of extremism, types of terrorism, and government response.

3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under direct supervision of a faculty member. Minimum 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour. Department agreement form must be completed.
1- 3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

CRJ 465 Sex Offenders

This course examines sex offenders and their offenses in the context of the criminal justice system and subsequent reintegration back into society.
3

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 470 Justice Professionalism and Ethics

Students must have completed 70 credit hours to register for this course. Examine ethical theory, controversies, and rules of moral judgment as they relate to criminal justice practitioners. Discuss and evaluate ethical dilemmas faced by those working in the criminal justice system.

3

Prerequisites

( 70.0 credits required) and (CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C)

CRJ 475 Race/Ethnicity, Gender, and Social Class in Criminal Justice

Students must have completed 70 credit hours to register for this course. Presents a critical analysis of the impact of race/ethnicity, gender, and social class in the criminal justice system, including examination of law enforcement, the courts, corrections, offending, and victimization.

3

Prerequisites

( 70.0 credits required) and (CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C)

CRJ 480 Applied Statistics in Criminal Justice

Study of basic descriptive and inferential statistics with emphasis on applications in the criminal justice system. Second of two required research and statistics classes for the Criminology and Criminal Justice B.A.

3

Prerequisites

CRJ 380 with a minimum grade of C

CRJ 492 Internship

Supervised experience in a justice agency. Fifty work hours required for each credit hour earned. Credit only for work completed during the semester enrolled. Arrange placement prior to course enrollment. S/U graded.
3- 9

Prerequisites

CRJ 110 with a minimum grade of C

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Criminal Justice (and) Criminology & Criminal Justice Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior and Junior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

CS 101 Introduction to Computer Science

Breadth-first study of computer science concepts. Topics include machine architecture, programming, problemsolving techniques, algorithms, operating systems, networking, security, computations, graphics, GUIs, Al, databases, software engineering, and social issues.
3

Course Attribute

Liberal Arts Core Elective

CS 120 Introduction to Programming

Become familiar with designing and writing programs in a high-level language. Programs will involve some technical applications in science and mathematics.
3

CS 160 Structured Programming

Study the structured programming development methods; the data types, operators, expressions, control flow, and input and output of a specific structured programming language; and some elementary data structures and algorithms.
3

CS 200 Object-Oriented Analysis, Design, and Programming

Study the software development life cycle; elements of the object model; object-oriented data types and functions; object-oriented enhancements to structured programming; and additional data structures and algorithms.
3

Prerequisites

CS 160 with a minimum grade of C

CS 301 Algorithms and Data Structures

Internal representation and applications of lists, trees, graphs, sorting, searching, and hashing. Focus on the interactions among algorithm, data structures, and storage structures for the processing of data.
3

Prerequisites

CS 160 with a minimum grade of C

CS 302 Programming Languages

Basic components of programming languages. Specification of syntax and semantics. Description of programming languages features. Examine a wide variety of languages with an emphasis on their structure, design, and use.

3

Prerequisites

CS 301 with a minimum grade of C

CS 350 Software Engineering I

Study concepts of engineering software systems. Design and implement a software system project using the team approach.
3

Prerequisites

CS 200 with a minimum grade of C

CS 395 Special Topics in Computer Science

Topics in computer science that reflect the specific interests of available instructors and the specific needs of the students
1- 3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

CS 422 Directed Studies

A plan should be submitted and approved by all computer science faculty. Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 4

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 1 times

CS 440 Operating Systems

Study operating systems history, concepts/structure and design; process, processor, memory, file system and input/output management; and representative operating systems.

3

Prerequisites

CS 301 with a minimum grade of C

CS 442 Networking

Study data communications; network structure, design and architectures; network services and standardization; and respective networks all in the framework of the OSI model.
3

Prerequisites

CS 301 with a minimum grade of C

CS 454 Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery

This course considers the use of machine learning and data mining algorithms to discover knowledge embedded in datasets. Topics include techniques such as classification, clustering, predictive and statistical modeling.

3

Prerequisites

(MATH 311 or STAT 411 with a minimum grade of C)

CS 456 Neural Networks and Deep Learning

This course examines state-of-the-art AI approaches to deep learning using neural networks. Students will learn to design neural network architectures and training procedures via hands-on assignments and projects.

3

Prerequisites

(MATH 311 with a minimum grade of C or (CS 120 and MATH 221 and MATH 233 with a minimum grade of C))

CS 460 Problem Solving with Supercomputers

Basics of Linux administration and scripting in an HPC environment. Utilizing an HPC cluster to carry out a significant research project.
3

Prerequisites

CS 120 with a minimum grade of B

CS 480 Graphics

Study graphics theory and applications including the description and transformation of world, viewpoint, eye and screen coordinates, two and three dimensional graphics and hidden line algorithms.

3

Prerequisites

CS 301 with a minimum grade of C

CS 489 Project in Data Science

This is a project course in data science and related fields. Interdisciplinary teams will analyze a new data science problem, develop a model, and control for error and overfitting.

2

Prerequisites

STAT 411 with a minimum grade of C

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: CS 489 and STAT 489

CS 497 Senior Project

A significant computer project will be developed and implemented under the guidance of a computer science professor. A project proposal should be submitted and approved by all computer science faculty.
1- 8

Class Restriction

Include Senior

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 8 credit hours

DNCE 166 Ballet I

Gain knowledge and skill in the activity of ballet.
2

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

DNCE 167 Ballroom Dance I

Gain knowledge and skill in the activity of ballroom dancing.
2

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

DNCE 170 Jazz Dance I

Gain knowledge and skill in the activity of jazz dance.
2

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

DNCE 171 Modern Dance I

Gain knowledge and skill in the activity of modern dance.
2

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

DNCE 172 Foundations of Hip Hop

The purpose of this course is to provide introductory concepts in the foundational elements of Hip-Hop dance. Coursework will cover basic elements of the various styles of Hip-Hop dance including: Up Rock, Breaking, Locking, Popping and Roboting. Historical relevant commentary will be added as a matter of course as each style has its origins in American Culture and the rise of Hip-Hop music.
2

DNCE 175 Tap Dance I

Gain knowledge and skill in the activity of tap dance.
2

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

DNCE 180 Ballet II

Gain intermediate knowledge and skill in the activity of ballet.
3

Prerequisites

DNCE 166 with a minimum grade of D-

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 3 times

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

DNCE 181 Jazz Dance II

Gain intermediate knowledge and skill in the activity of jazz dance.
3

Prerequisites

DNCE 170 with a minimum grade of D-

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 3 times

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

DNCE 182 Modern Dance II

Gain intermediate knowledge and skill in the activity of modern dance.
3

Prerequisites

DNCE 171 with a minimum grade of D-

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 3 times

DNCE 183 Tap Dance II

Gain intermediate knowledge and skill in the activity of tap dance.
2

Prerequisites

DNCE 175 with a minimum grade of D-

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 3 times

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

DNCE 280 Ballet III

This course is designed to introduce the basic concepts of Ballet at the advanced level. Concentration will be placed on proper alignment, placement, and rotation of the legs from the hip sockets.
3

Prerequisites

(DNCE 166 and DNCE 180 with a minimum grade of D-)

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 4 times

DNCE 281 Jazz Dance III

A continuation in the study of the technique and performance qualities of Jazz dance with specific emphasis placed on nuance, control of movement, and quality of movement in performance as well as advanced technical concepts.
3

Prerequisites

DNCE 181 with a minimum grade of D-

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 4 times

DNCE 296 Choreography and Improvisation I

Investigate and explore principles of modern dance composition such as movement manipulation, phrasing, spatial design and choreographic form. Experiences in spontaneous movement exploration.
3

DNCE 308 Workshop in Dance

Study in the problem areas of participants. Problems will vary with experts conducting workshops. S/U graded.
1- 2

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

DNCE 355 Dance Performance II

Study and practice of basic theories of dance performance, either in student informal or formal concert setting.
3

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

DNCE 397 Choreography and Improvisation II

Learn intermediate level dance technique; movement analysis and composition as an intermediate dance student.
3

Prerequisites

DNCE 296 with a minimum grade of D-

DNCE 459 Dance Production in High School and College

Make practical application of principles that serve the presentation of dance. Deal with the choreographic problems, its direction and production involving theatre application of set, costume and light design.

2

Prerequisites

DNCE 397 with a minimum grade of C-

ECLD 350 Teaching Young Bilingual Children

Learn about research based and standards-based methods, approaches, and programs for teaching English as a Second Language/English as a Foreign Language to young children (Birth-3rd grade).
3

ECLD 450 Literacy/Content Instruction in Bilingual Classrooms

Fluency in Spanish as indicated by the Spanish Oral Proficiency Exam. Students will examine content area and concepts in methodology, curriculum and resources when instruction is delivered in Spanish.
3

ECON 203 Principles of Macroeconomics

Discuss and study macroeconomic issues and models of aggregate economic analysis with emphasis on income, expenditures, fiscal and monetary policy, employment, inflation and growth.
3

Course Attribute

LC5a-Economic & Political Sys and GT Economics & Political Sys

ECON 205 Principles of Microeconomics

Supply and demand, consumer utility, production and costs, perfect competition, pure monopoly, resource allocation, public goods, income distribution and economic regulation.
3

Course Attribute

LC5a-Economic & Political Sys and GT Economics & Political Sys

ECON 301 Money and Banking

The study of monetary theory, monetary policy, money, banking and the Federal Reserve System.
3

Prerequisites

ECON 203 with a minimum grade of D-

ECON 303 Intermediate Macroeconomics

Study the determinants of aggregate demand, aggregate supply, employment, macroeconomic objectives and policies.
3

Prerequisites

ECON 203 with a minimum grade of D-

ECON 304 Economics of Gender

Study of heterodox economic theory as pertaining to the economic status of women and men, the institutions that have affected their economic relative status, and probable impacts of traditional economic definitions and practices on the relative status of women and other minority groups.
3

Prerequisites

(ECON 203 or ECON 205 with a minimum grade of D-)

ECON 305 Intermediate Microeconomics

The theory of consumer choice, of the business firm and resource allocation.
3

Prerequisites

ECON 205 with a minimum grade of D-

ECON 310 Economics of Entrepreneurship

This course will give an in-depth understanding of how to apply economics to decisions faced by today's growing number of business enterprises. Focus is on Colorado's new enterprises.
3

Prerequisites

(ECON 205 or ECON 101 with a minimum grade of D-)

ECON 315 Labor Economics

Examine labor movements, development of labor laws and policy, economics of labor markets and employment.
3

Prerequisites

(ECON 203 or ECON 205 with a minimum grade of D-)

ECON 325 Behavioral Economics

This course covers the fundamental concepts, theories, and applications of behavioral and experimental economics to understand how economic decisions are made and the mechanisms that drive public choice.
3

Prerequisites

ECON 205 with a minimum grade of D-

ECON 335 Environmental and Resource Economics

Students will examine the strengths and weaknesses of economic theory in analyzing the seriousness of resource and environmental issues facing society.
3

Prerequisites

ECON 205 with a minimum grade of D-

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ECON 335 and ENST 335

ECON 341 Public Finance

Government financing at federal, state and local levels as reflected in expenditures, revenues and debt.
3

Prerequisites

(ECON 203 and ECON 205 with a minimum grade of D-)

ECON 344 International Economics

Examine theories of international trade and the impact of trade policies on income and employment. Explores the international financial system, including exchange rates and capital flow.
3

Prerequisites

(ECON 203 and ECON 205 with a minimum grade of D-)

ECON 349 Economics of Religion

This course will employ various economic models, theories, and concepts to study religious beliefs and institutions. The primary focus will be on Christianity and the changing religious landscape in the United States.
3

Prerequisites

ECON 205 with a minimum grade of D-

ECON 350 Application of Mathematics to Economics

Introduces students to the application of mathematics to the analysis of economic problems. Numerous examples and exercises are used to integrate mathematically formulated models with economic analysis.
3

Prerequisites

(ECON 303 and ECON 305 and MATH 124 with a minimum grade of D-)

ECON 356 Water Resource Economics

Examination of economic principles governing water planning, development and law. Discussion of supply and demand, quality and political issues. Relationship to Colorado and local situation.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ECON 356 and ENST 356

ECON 360 Economics of Growth and Development

Analyze the theory, processes and history of economic growth and development, emphasizing resource use and productivity in less developed areas.
3

Prerequisites

(ECON 203 or ECON 205 with a minimum grade of D-)

ECON 362 Economic History of the United States

Review the historical changes in United States economic institutions. Assess United States history based on macroeconomic and microeconomic pressures. Emphasis is on post-Civil War period.
3

Prerequisites

(ECON 203 and ECON 205 with a minimum grade of D-)

ECON 365 Urban and Housing Economics

Students study economic problems relevant to urban areas including land use, housing and poverty, and the role of the private and public sector in resolving these problems.
3

Prerequisites

(ECON 203 and ECON 205 with a minimum grade of D-)

ECON 370 History of Economic Thought

Trace the evolution of economic thinking from 17th century to modern day. See roles played by certain schools of economic thinkers, the genesis of their ideas and their contributions.
3

Prerequisites

(ECON 203 and ECON 205 with a minimum grade of D-)

ECON 377 Industrial Organizations

Theoretical and empirical study of the structure, organization and conduct of firms on economic performance and welfare.
3

Prerequisites

ECON 205 with a minimum grade of D-

ECON 378 Energy Policy and Economics

This course examines the dominant trends and challenges affecting energy systems and policy around the world, including the evolution and economics of fossil fuels, alternative energy technologies, and clean energy policies.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ECON 378 and ENST 378

ECON 382 Sustainability and Capitalism

Use case studies to explore a general overview of commerce, economics, and business as it relates to the environment and human interaction.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ECON 382 and ENST 382

ECON 395 Special Topics in Economics

This course explores various topics in economics.
3

Prerequisites

(ECON 203 or ECON 205 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

ECON 422 Directed Study

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.
1- 3

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

ECON 452 Econometrics

Estimating statistical regression models of economic relationships; treatment of special problems that may arise in analysis of economic data.
3

Prerequisites

(ECON 303 and ECON 305 and STAT 150 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Economics Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior

ECON 475 Senior Seminar

Apply economic theory, research methodologies, and modeling techniques to the analysis of current issues facing society.
3

Prerequisites

(ECON 303 and ECON 305 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Economics Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior

ECON 492 Internship in Economics

Internships in the public and private sectors to provide students with professional experience.
3- 6

Prerequisites

GPA-2.5

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

EDEC 101 Introduction to Early Childhood Education

Key areas of professional knowledge: child growth and development; health, nutrition and safety; developmentally appropriate practice; guidance; family and community relationships; diversity; professionalism; administration and supervision. Ages birth through 8.
3

EDEC 102 Introduction to Early Childhood Education Lab

60 Lab hours and 15 seminar hours. The supervised placement in a child care setting. Observe children, practice appropriate interactions, and develop effective guidance and management techniques. Ages 0 through 8.
3

EDEC 103 Guidance Strategies for Children

Explores guidance theories, applications, goals, techniques and factors that influence expectations, classroom management issues, and pro-social skills Addresses ages birth through age 8.
3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Early Childhood Major(s)

EDEC 205 Nutrition, Health, and Safety

Nutrition, health and safety as key factors for optimal growth and development of young children. Nutrient knowledge, menu planning, food program participation, health practices, management and safety. Prenatal through age 8.
3

EDEC 220 Curriculum Development: Methods and Techniques

An overview of early childhood curriculum development. Planning and implementing developmentally appropriate instruction.
3

EDEC 240 Administration of Early Childhood Care and Education Program

Examines Colorado's minimal licensing requirements, as well as optimal standards pertaining to the operation of programs for young children. Focuses on the director's administrative skills and role as a community advocate for young children. Addresses ages birth through 12.
3

EDEC 241 Administration: Human Relations for Early Childhood

Human relations component of an early childhood professional's responsibilities: director-staff relationships, leadership strategies, parent partnerships and community interaction.
3

EDEC 308 Early Childhood Workshop

Study problems in early childhood education. Area covered in any one workshop determined by subtitle. S/U graded.
1-10

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

EDEC 315 Children's Literature for Early Childhood, Pre K to 3rd Grade

This course will examine the field of children's literature and provide early childhood students with the skills, knowledge, and attitudes to select high-quality children's books to read to and be read by young children (birth through third-grade).
3

Prerequisites

GPA-2.5

EDEC 330 Development and Education of Infants and Toddlers

This course presents an overview of theories and applications including observation and issues pertinent to infant and toddler development in group and family settings.
3

Program Restrictions

Include INDS:Early Childhood Ed-BA and INDS:Early Childhood LA-BA and Early Childhood:Lib Arts-BA and Early Childhood:Teacher Ed-BA and Early Childhood:Lib Arts-BA and Early Childhood:Teacher Ed-BA

EDEC 360 School Programs for Young Children

Focus on authentic community service in the context of School Programs for Young Children. Includes a forty-five hour practicum experience and 1.5 per week class.
3

Prerequisites

(GPA-2.75) and (EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Program Restrictions

Include Early Childhood:Teacher Ed-BA and INDS:Early Childhood Ed-BA and Early Childhood:Lib Arts-BA

Course Attribute

Community Engaged Learning

EDEC 361 School Programs for Young Children (CUE)

Focus on Authentic community service in the context of School Programs for Young Children.
2

Prerequisites

(GPA-2.75) and (Applic for Intitial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9).

EDEC 400 Child Development in Context (0-8 years)

This course encompasses early childhood development (0-8 years) and research based classroom adaptations of the four domains: physical, psycho-social, cognitive, and language development. Observations are required for understanding child development within the context of pluralistic environments.
3

EDEC 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 3

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

EDEC 450 Family Diversity and Involvement Early Childhood Education

The major purpose of this course is to present the theoretical foundation and practical applications of family diversity and parent involvement in early childhood education.
3

EDEC 455 Creative Expression and Play in Early Childhood

Addresses the importance of high quality and meaningful play and creative arts experience across the early childhood curriculum. Applies the creative arts to enhance the development of basic skills.
3

EDEC 461 Early Childhood Curriculum Language Arts

Developmentally appropriate programming for children ages 3-8 in the curriculum areas of literacy and the social world. Appropriate assessment for programming will be included.
3

Prerequisites

(GPA-3.0) and (EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9) and (EDEC 360 with a minimum grade of D-)

EDEC 463 Early Childhood Curriculum Social Studies

This course teaches teachers of young children the subject area of social studies in K-3 curriculum. Content knowledge and teaching strategies will be the focus of the course. During the semester, students will be in a field experience associated with the literacy methods course that will allow them to also focus on the area of social studies within an elementary primary classroom.
3

Prerequisites

(GPA-3.0) and (EDFE 120 or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Corequisites

EDEC 464 and EDEC 465 and EDEC 480

EDEC 464 Early Childhood Curriculum Language Arts

This course encompasses literacy and language arts in K-3 curriculum. Content knowledge and teaching strategies will be the focus of the course. Eighty hours of field experience are required.
4

Prerequisites

(GPA-3.0) and (EDFE 120 or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Corequisites

EDEC 463 and EDEC 465 and EDEC 480

EDEC 465 Managing Early Childhood Classrooms

Examine components of effective classroom management procedures with children in groups. Topics include theoretical perspectives, rules and organization, pro-social behavior, and effective pedagogical decisions.
2

Prerequisites

(GPA-3.0) and (EDFE 120 or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Corequisites

EDEC 463 and EDEC 464 and EDEC 480

EDEC 475 Assessment for Primary Classrooms

Assessment issues, practices, and techniques in the K-3 elementary school classrooms.
3

EDEC 480 Early Childhood Curriculum II Mathematics and Science

Subject areas of mathematics and science in K-3 curriculum. Content knowledge, effective teaching strategies, and assessment will be the focus of the course. Ninety-six hours of field experience required.
6

Prerequisites

(GPA-3.0) and (EDFE 120 or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Corequisites

EDEC 463 and EDEC 464 and EDEC 465

EDEC 490 Early Childhood Student Teaching

This is a field-based course, providing full-time focused teaching experience in grades K-3 for 16 weeks (640 clock hours). Graded S/U. Main Campus students must take 12 credits. Urban Education students must take 6 credits.
6-12

Prerequisites

(GPA-3.0) and (EDFE 130 with a minimum grade of S or (Passed Required Praxis with a minimum score of 9 and Application for Student Tching with a minimum score of 9))

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 1 times

Course Fee

Supervision Fee Required

EDEL 101 Elementary Teaching as a Profession

Introduces the Interdisciplinary Studies Elementary Teaching major (ISET) and the Elementary Professional Teacher Education Program (PTEP). Examines professional expectations of today's elementary teachers and how UNC coursework prepares candidates for teaching.
1

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Elementary Education Major(s)/Minor(s)

EDEL 250 Elementary Teaching in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Settings

This course provides an introduction to multicultural education, standards-based instruction and lesson planning, the legal responsibilities of teachers, and content instruction as it pertains to diverse learners.
3

Prerequisites

(EDEL 101 with a minimum grade of D-) and (Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9 or EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Elementary Education Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Attribute

Community Engaged Learning

EDEL 320 Teaching With Writing

Provides pre-service elementary teachers with theoretical foundations and practical skills necessary to become reflective professionals who can design and implement effective writing instruction for their students while developing their own skills in writing.
3

Prerequisites

(EDEL 250 and EDEL 101 with a minimum grade of D-)

EDEL 339 Assessment Data for Elementary Classrooms: Large Sets

This course examines in-depth understanding of large student data assessments including effective practices, implementation, and ways to use data to improve teaching in the K-6 elementary school classrooms.
1

Corequisites

EDEL 420 and EDEL 459 and SCED 475

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Elementary Education Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

EDEL 350 Emergent Literacy, Pre-K Through Grade 3

Theory and practice in teaching reading and language arts in pre-kindergarten through grade three. Instructional strategies and learning environments that nurture emergent literacy, practical methods of assessment. 30 hours of field experience.
3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Course Attribute

Community Engaged Learning

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 1 times

EDEL 359 Emergent Literacy, Pre-K Through Grade 3

Study of theory and practice, instructional strategies and learning environments in teaching reading and language arts in pre-kindergarten through grade three.
1

Prerequisites

(GPA-2.75) and (EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Campus Restriction

Urban Education Majors only

EDEL 420 Elementary School Mathematics Methods

Teacher candidates acquire specific subject matter content while learning instructional strategies related to teaching mathematics education in elementary school classrooms.
3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Corequisites

EDEL 339 and EDEL 459 and SCED 475

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Elementary Education Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

EDEL 421 Mathematics Practicum

Mathematics field base learning practicum in elementary schools under the supervision and coordination of university faculty and partner school personnel for 8 weeks with two additional meetings on campus.
1

Prerequisites

(GPA-3.0) and (MATH 181 and MATH 283 with a minimum grade of D-)

Corequisites

EDEL 450

EDEL 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 3

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

EDEL 425 Elementary School Social Studies Methods

Teacher candidates acquire specific subject matter content while learning instructional strategies related to teaching social studies education in elementary school classrooms.
3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Corequisites

EDEL 455 and EDEL 457

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Elementary Education Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

EDEL 444 ESL & Bilingual Supervised Teaching

A field experience that includes eleven weeks of continuous field experiences with supervision by university and school faculty and integrated seminars. S/U graded.
1-15

Prerequisites

(EDFE 130 with a minimum grade of S or (Application for Student Tching with a minimum score of 9 and Passed Required Praxis with a minimum score of 9))

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 15 credit hours

EDEL 445 Intermediate Literacy

Course integrates methods of reading and reading diagnosis along with language arts in the Intermediate grades (3-6). Students learn instructional techniques, activities, assessment, and content knowledge.

3

Prerequisites

(GPA-3.0) and (EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9) and (EDEL 350 with a minimum grade of D-)

Corequisites

EDEL 446

EDEL 446 Literacy Practicum

Field-based learning practicum in partnership schools under the supervision and coordination of university faculty and partner school personnel for 16 weeks.
2

Prerequisites

(GPA-3.0) and (EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Corequisites

EDEL 445

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 1 times

Course Fee

Supervision Fee Required

EDEL 450 Integrated Social Studies and Mathematics Methods

Teacher candidates acquire specific subject matter content while learning how to design and engage in classroom practices related to mathematics and social studies education in elementary school classrooms.
6

Prerequisites

(GPA-3.0) and (EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9) and (MATH 283 with a minimum grade of D-)

Corequisites

EDEL 421

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Elementary Education (and) Interdisciplinary Studies Major(s)/Minor(s)

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 1 times

EDEL 454 Student Teaching

Fifteen weeks of field-based experience in an elementary classroom under the supervision and coordination of university faculty and cooperating school personnel.
12

Prerequisites

(GPA-3.0) and (EDFE 130 with a minimum grade of S or (Passed Required Praxis with a minimum score of 9 and Application for Student Tching with a minimum score of 9))

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Elementary Education Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Course Fee

Supervision Fee Required

EDEL 455 Approaches to Content Literacy for Diverse Learners

Builds on EDEL 350 Emergent Literacy and TESL 380 Introduction to Linguistics to examine content literacy for all learners, including culturally and linguistically diverse learners. Examines theories, concepts, and research relevant to the development of content area language/literacy including how to implement effective strategies and select appropriate materials for all students’ language/literacy development and content learning with special attention to CLD population.
3

Prerequisites

(EDEL 250 and EDEL 350 with a minimum grade of D-) and (EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Corequisites

EDEL 425 and EDEL 457

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Elementary Education Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

EDEL 457 Social Studies/Literacy Practicum

Field-based learning practicum in partnership schools under the supervision and coordination of university faculty and partner school personnel for 15 weeks. Teacher Candidates will teach in inclusive elementary classrooms (K-2 or 3-6 whichever they did not complete in EDEL 459) to implement best instructional practices for all learners.

3

Prerequisites

(GPA-2.75) and (EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Corequisites

EDEL 425 and EDEL 455

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Elementary Education Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

EDEL 459 Mathematics/Science Practicum

Field-based learning practicum in partnership schools under the supervision and coordination of university faculty and partner school personnel for 15 weeks. Teacher Candidates will teach in inclusive elementary classrooms (K-2 or 3-6; whichever they did not complete in EDEL 457) to implement best instructional practices for all learners.

3

Prerequisites

(GPA-2.75) and (MATH 283 with a minimum grade of D-) and (EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Corequisites

EDEL 339 and EDEL 420 and SCED 475

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Elementary Education Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

EDEL 461 Integrated Science Methods I

Urban Education Students will learn how to conduct Project WILD activities, explore ways to integrate this resource into school curricula, and participate in activities to become comfortable and knowledgeable to teach science.
1

Campus Restriction

Urban Education Majors only

EDEL 462 Integrated Science Methods II

Students will design a lesson plan, distinguish between science lessons and thematic units, and create assessment tools applicable to their needs. They will learn how to do Project WILD activities.
1

Prerequisites

EDEL 461 with a minimum grade of D-

Campus Restriction

Urban Education Majors only

EDEL 463 Integrated Science Methods III

Students will apply the Learning Cycle to lesson planning, and construct thematic units taking advantage of interdisciplinary planning, teaming, hands-on, minds-on activities and assessment instruments.
1

Prerequisites

(EDEL 461 and EDEL 452 with a minimum grade of D-)

Campus Restriction

Urban Education Majors only

EDEL 464 Integrated Literacy Methods - Writing Process

Develops an understanding of children's growth in the writing process, and examines recording, assessing and reporting student progress. Students will participate in a field-related apprenticeship.
1

Prerequisites

(Concurrent Prerequisite ENG 122 with a minimum grade of D- or SAT Verbal with a minimum score of 630 or ACT English with a minimum score of 30)

Campus Restriction

Urban Education Majors only

EDEL 465 Integrated Literacy Methods -Literature Response and Classroom Application

This course emphasizes the writing process. Students will develop an understanding of children's growth in the writing process and examine recording, assessing and reporting student progress. Field related apprenticeship required.
1

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite ENG 131 with a minimum grade of D-

Campus Restriction

Urban Education Majors only

EDEL 466 Integrated Literacy Methods - Strategic Literacy and Instruction

Urban Education Learn strategies related to emergent literacy, word knowledge, recognition, and analysis, and the ability to flexibly combine these strategies with the broader purpose of reading for meaning. Tutoring component required.
1

Campus Restriction

Urban Education Majors only

EDEL 467 Integrated Literacy Methods - Diagnosis, Individualism and Assessment

Examines reading difficulties, diagnosis and individualization; experience using formal/informal standards-based assessment. Explores literacy assessment; requires demonstrated ability to use performance-based assessment in literacy instruction. Tutoring component required.
1

Prerequisites

EDEL 466 with a minimum grade of D-

Campus Restriction

Urban Education Majors only

EDEL 468 Integrated Literacy Methods - Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum

Urban Education Develops sensitivity to the affective and cognitive needs of elementary students in reading and writing to learn in the content areas. Students will participate in field related apprenticeships.
1

Campus Restriction

Urban Education Majors only

EDEL 471 Integrated Instruction in Elementary School Social Studies - Geography

Urban Education Students will learn curriculum, course planning, teaching strategies, materials, and assessment, with examples of successful pedagogical approaches for teaching standards-based geography concepts.
1

Campus Restriction

Urban Education Majors only

EDEL 472 Integrated Instruction in Elementary Social Studies - History

Urban Education Students will learn curriculum, course planning, teaching strategies, materials, and assessment with examples of successful pedagogical approaches for teaching standards-based concepts.
1

Campus Restriction

Urban Education Majors only

EDEL 473 Integrated Instruction in Economics and Citizenship Education

Urban Education Students will learn curriculum, course planning, teaching strategies, materials, and assessment with examples of successful pedagogical approaches for teaching standards-based economics and citizenship education concepts.
1

Campus Restriction

Urban Education Majors only

EDEL 474 Integrated Elementary Math Education I

Focus on a small, integrated unit involving children's literature, social studies and math. Number sense, use of hands-on materials and problem solving to construct understanding in math are emphasized.
1

Prerequisites

(Concurrent Prerequisite MATH 181 and Concurrent Prerequisite MATH 182 with a minimum grade of D-)

Campus Restriction

Urban Education Majors only

EDEL 475 Integrated Elementary Math Education II

Focuses on problem solving emphasizing real world application and the use of technology. Colorado Model Standards for Mathematics and Performance-Based Standards for Colorado Teachers will be applied.
1

Prerequisites

EDEL 474 with a minimum grade of D-

Campus Restriction

Urban Education Majors only

EDEL 476 Integrated Elementary Math Education III

Focus on assessment, continuing development of lesson plans based on authentic problem solving and integration with other content areas. Colorado Model Standards for Mathematics will be applied.
1

Prerequisites

(EDEL 474 and EDEL 475 with a minimum grade of D-)

Campus Restriction

Urban Education Majors only

EDEL 477 Integrated Elementary Art Education

Urban Education Students learn instructional techniques, activities and content knowledge appropriate for the teaching of art in the elementary school setting. Integration with other content areas is emphasized.
1

Campus Restriction

Urban Education Majors only

EDEL 478 Integrated Elementary Music Education

Urban Education Elements of music, benefits of music study, practice in reading nontraditional music notation, making/playing musical instruments, movement, listening, beginning improvisation and composition, multicultural resources, and music technology.
1

Campus Restriction

Urban Education Majors only

EDEL 479 Integrated Elementary Physical Education

Urban Education Study effective teaching and learning theories, basic movement principles and activities included in a quality program of physical education in the elementary school. Integration with content areas is emphasized when appropriate.
1

Campus Restriction

Urban Education Majors only

EDF 366 Conceptions of Schooling: Context and Process

Focuses on developing an understanding of the social, historical, and philosophical foundations of schooling including ethical, legal, and multicultural perspectives for the professional educator in contemporary American society.
3

Prerequisites

(GPA-2.5) and (EDFE 110 or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

EDF 370 Social Foundations of Education

Social, historical and philosophical foundations of education. Critical interdisciplinary examination of schooling in a democratic pluralistic society.
3

Prerequisites

(GPA-2.75) and (EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

EDF 408 Workshop

A variety of workshops on special topics within the discipline. Goals and objectives will emphasize the acquisition of general knowledge and skills in the discipline.
1- 3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

EDF 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour)
1- 3

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

EDFE 110 Application for Initial Admission to PTEP

Must have completed a minimum of 15 semester hours. Submit completed packet to the STE Office. Requirements/Checklist can be found on-line at http://www.unco.edu/teach/check.html. S/U Graded.
0

EDFE 120 Application for Full Admission to PTEP

Submit completed packet to the STE Office. Requirements/Checklist can be found on-line at http://www.unco.edu/teach/check.html. S/U graded.
0

Prerequisites

EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S

EDFE 125 Application for Graduate Licensure Admission to PTEP

Submit completed packet to the STE Office. Requirements/Checklist can be found on-line at http://www.unco.edu/teach/check.html. S/U graded.
0

Level Restriction

Include GR

EDFE 130 Application for Student Teaching

Submit completed packet to the STE Office. Requirements/Checklist can be found on-line at http://www.unco.edu/teach/check.html.. Subject to approval by Major Content Advisor. S/U graded.
0

Prerequisites

(EDFE 120 or EDFE 125 with a minimum grade of S)

EDFE 170 Introduction to Field Based Experience

Supervised teacher apprenticeship experience. Assignments to assist personal or professional development in the public or private school. Portfolio and seminars required. Letter graded.
1- 3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

EDFE 270 Field Based Experience

Entry into the teaching profession. Aide assignment in school or agency at preschool-12 level. Required portfolio and seminars.
2

Prerequisites

(GPA-2.5) and (EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 1 times

EDFE 370 Advanced Field Based Experience

Advanced supervised teacher apprenticeship experiences. Assignments to assist personal or professional development in the public or private school. Portfolio and seminars required. Letter graded.
1- 3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 170 with a minimum grade of D-) and (EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

EDFE 444 Supervised Student Teaching

Must also meet all student teaching requirements for certification.
1-15

Prerequisites

(GPA-3.0) and (EDFE 130 with a minimum grade of S or Passed Required Praxis with a minimum score of 9 or Application for Student Tching with a minimum score of 9)

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 15 credit hours

Course Fee

Supervision Fee Required

EDI 101 Field of Interpreting

Introduces concept of interpreting as a profession and exploring what student needs to know and do to be a professional interpreter.
1

EDI 111 Child and Language Development

Focuses on theories of child development and acquisition of first language, understanding of children's/youths' development and integral role language plays in that development.
1

EDI 112 Language and Learning in Deaf Children

Delves into language acquisition and cognition, focusing on children who are deaf or hard of hearing, and on acquisition of ASL and types of discourse common in classroom, BICS, CALP.
2

Prerequisites

EDI 111 with a minimum grade of D-

EDI 113 Deaf Education

Overview of public education/deaf education practices, legal foundation for inclusion in public schools, and Individualized Education Plan.
1

Prerequisites

EDI 101 with a minimum grade of D-

EDI 114 Educational Interpreting

Covers historical background and current efforts in development of professional guidelines for Educational Interpreting, focusing on standards guiding role, responsibilities, and practices of the profession.
1

Prerequisites

(EDI 101 and EDI 111 and EDI 112 and EDI 113 with a minimum grade of D-)

EDI 121 Languages and Sign Systems

Investigate languages/communication modes used particularly by deaf students in public schools, acquire ASL transcription skills, and discuss implications language choices have interpreters.
1

Prerequisites

(EDI 101 and EDI 113 with a minimum grade of D-)

EDI 122 Discourse Analysis: Language Use in Education

Focuses on discourse/language, its analysis, and meaning in classroom. Discusses how interpretation requires understanding of context and intent, not simply individual words/signs, and its effect on students' access to information.
1

Prerequisites

EDI 121 with a minimum grade of D-

EDI 124 Discourse Analysis: Interpreting Discourse

Focuses on foundational skills essential to effective interpreting including text analysis, abstracting, paraphrasing, linguistic/meaning analysis, feedback/self-assessment skills, and glossing/transcription.
1

EDI 131 Skills Development Lab I: Foundational Skills

Focuses on skill development for educational interpreters including language (signed, spoken) and interpreting/translitering skills. Student develop self-assessment skills and practice professional feedback strategies.
4

EDI 132 Skills Development Lab II: Language Mentorship

Further skill development, focused on visual language, continued application of self-analysis/transcription skills to enhance interpret effectiveness, and assignment of mentor (to foster fluency in signing). Formats: WebCT, videotape exchange, feedback.
1

Prerequisites

(EDI 124 and EDI 131 with a minimum grade of D-)

Program Restrictions

Include Educational Interpreting-Cert

EDI 133 Skills Development Lab III: Language Mentorship

Further/final skill development lab, focused on visual language, continued application of self-analysis/transcription skills enhancing interpret effectiveness, and assignment of mentor (to foster fluency in signing). Formats: WebCT, videotape exchange, feedback.
1

Prerequisites

(EDI 124 and EDI 131 and EDI 132 with a minimum grade of D-)

EDI 211 Curriculum Methods and Materials K-12

Introduces framework of public school educational process, including standards that define content and learning theories, styles influencing instructional methods and trends in classrooms.
1

Prerequisites

(EDI 113 and EDI 114 with a minimum grade of D-)

EDI 212 Tutoring Techniques

Provides overview of tutoring support for students who are deaf and hard of hearing, including planning, preparation, and delivery phases of tutoring sessions.
1

Prerequisites

EDI 211 with a minimum grade of D-

EDI 223 Communication Assessment: Techniques for Educational Interpreters

Focuses on linguistics and discourse analysis as well as techniques for assessing language of students, teachers, and communication events in educational settings.
1

Prerequisites

(EDI 111 and EDI 112 and EDI 113 and EDI 114 and EDI 121 and EDI 122 with a minimum grade of D-)

EDI 231 Skills Development: K-12 Content Areas

Focuses on interpretation of K-12 content materials, using actual practice time, discussions of classroom goals/language/mode choice, and development of prepared consecutive and simultaneous materials.
2

Prerequisites

(EDI 131 and EDI 132 and EDI 133 with a minimum grade of D-)

EDI 232 Skills Development: K-12 Non-content Areas

Focuses on interpreting activities outside academic areas through actual practice time using appropriate content material, discussions of classroom goals/language/mode choice, and development of prepared consecutive and simultaneous materials.
2

Prerequisites

(EDI 131 and EDI 132 and EDI 133 with a minimum grade of D-)

EDI 233 Skills Development Lab IV: Interpreting

Focuses on enhancement of student's simultaneous interpretation by engaging in frequent practice with review by peers/skills specialists (continuation of EDI 280).
3

Prerequisites

(EDI 131 and EDI 132 and EDI 231 and EDI 232 and EDI 280 with a minimum grade of D-)

EDI 234 Professional Educational Interpreter

All previous EDI courses. Explores ethical standards and practices related to the profession as well as specific application of ethical standards and practice in the educational context.
1

EDI 238 Portfolio

All previous EDI courses. Capstone of Educational Interpreting Program in which student demonstrates ability to meet core competencies by reflecting upon and integrating what student has learned in program. Also projects student's professional development.
2

EDI 280 Internship: Educational Interpreting

Focuses on aspects of interpretation of ASL to English/English to ASL through assignment of mentor to foster fluency and application of self-analysis/transcription skills for self-monitoring effectiveness as educational interpreter.
1

Prerequisites

(EDI 131 and EDI 132 and EDI 231 and EDI 232 with a minimum grade of D-)

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 2 credit hours

EDI 313 Professional Renewal

Update skills and knowledge of professionals in the discipline. Goals and objectives will be specifically directed at individual professional enhancement rather than the acquisition of general discipline knowledge or methodologies. S/U or letter graded.
1- 3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

EDNL 321 Literacy in the Digital Age

This course provides a foundation to digital and multimodal literacy practices. Candidates will gain an understanding of theories, currently practiced integration models, digital citizenship and evaluate digital tools and applications.
3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Elementary Education Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

EDNL 322 Digital Literacy and Multimodal Texts

This course is designed to provide teacher candidates with resources and strategies to read, critically analyze and teach multimodal and digital texts within the context of 21st century pedagogy.
3

Prerequisites

(EDNL 321 and EDRD 314 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Elementary Education Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

EDNL 423 Multimodal Design: Language Arts

In this course teacher candidates will engage in digital writing workshops that facilitate crafting multimodal texts, planning for and evaluating digital writing, and understanding issues related to copyright, fair use, and creative commons.
3

Prerequisites

(EDNL 321 and EDEL 320 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Elementary Education Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

EDNL 424 Multimodal Design: Literacy, Invention and Learning

Through this course, teacher candidates will learn concepts of design, invention and play through the integration of literacy across content areas. Candidates will engage in inquiry and exploration of problem and career-based learning.
3

Prerequisites

(EDEL 320 and EDNL 321 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Elementary Education Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

EDRD 314 Literature for Children, Adolescents and Young Adults

Consider interests and abilities governing choice of literature from kindergarten through young adult. Survey literature. Emphasize modern literature, uses of literature in curriculum and multiple responses to literature.
3

EDRD 319 Language and Literacy Development of Preschool and Elementary School Children

Examine development of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Review current research on language and literacy development including environmental factors that enhance or reduce from language literacy acquisition and development.
3

EDRD 340 Academic Language/Literacy Development in the Content Areas at the Secondary Level

Focuses on language/literacy development of all learners, including culturally and linguistically diverse learners in the academic context. Examines theories, concepts, and research to guide and inform instructional decisions. Covers effective strategies and appropriate materials for all students’ language/literacy development with particular attention to the CLD population.
3

Prerequisites

(GPA-2.5) and (EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

EDRD 408 Reading/Literacy Workshop

This seminar/workshop course will address various special interest topics relating to literacy education. Topics will include: literacy research, current trends in education policy, literacy instruction, and literacy leadership.
1

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Reading Major(s)/Minor(s)

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 8 credit hours

EDRD 410 Achieving Effective Instruction in Developmental Reading

Teaching/learning strategies, reading materials, selection, lesson planning and organizing for instruction in reading across the total curriculum constitute the focus of the course.

3

Prerequisites

(GPA-2.75) and (EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

EDRD 411 Elementary Reading Diagnosis and Individualization

Emphasizes reading diagnosis with elementary students leading to instruction through a variety of approaches toward the end of enabling teachers to select appropriate methods/materials.
3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9) and (EDRD 410 with a minimum grade of B)

EDRD 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 3

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

EDSE 130 Student Teaching Application

Submit to SPED Office in one package: Application Checklist, PLACE or PRAXIS exam results, an unofficial transcript copy with EDFE 120 and EDSE 130 highlighted, and Major Content Approval Form. Subject to approval by Major Content Advisor. S/U graded.
0

Prerequisites

(EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or (Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9 and Passed Required Praxis with a minimum score of 9))

EDSE 170 Introduction to Field Based Experience

Supervised teacher apprenticeship experiences (assessing, planning, teaching students with special needs in collaboration with families, education professionals, and community members). School placements may be public or private, K-12.
1- 3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

EDSE 201 Culture of Special Education

Introduction to special education, including: historical and legal perspective, characteristics of individuals with exceptionalities, issues related to identification and services, role of professionals in special and general education.
3

EDSE 203 The Individualized Education Program and the Collaborative Process

Addresses the development of the Individual Education Program through effective collaboration and consultation, including pre-referral through implementations, individualized planning, and student and family involvement.
3

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 201 with a minimum grade of D-

EDSE 270 Field-Based Experience

To become familiar with special education bachelor degree program requirements; introduced to teaching as a profession and the roles and responsibilities of special educators; school placements may be public or private, K-12; required classroom observations and seminars.
3

Prerequisites

(GPA-2.75) and (EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

EDSE 271 Field-Based Experience Seminar

To become familiar with special education bachelor degree program requirements; introduced to teaching as a profession and the roles and responsibilities of special educators; required seminars.
2

Prerequisites

(GPA-2.75) and (EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

EDSE 308 Workshop in Special Education

For beginning teachers and clinicians. Topics will include observation, techniques, programming, community relations, child development as related to exceptional children and evaluation for placement.
1- 3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

EDSE 320 Assessment in Special Education

Explore issues in assessment related to exceptional children. Emphasis placed on principles, purposes and processes of assessment related to programming in special education.
3

Prerequisites

(GPA-2.75) and (EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Course Fee

Assessment Fee Required

EDSE 321 Advanced Assessment in Special Education

Applied experience in the administration and interpretation of formal and informal achievement tests used with exceptional individuals.
3

Prerequisites

(EDSE 320 and Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 326 and Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 443 with a minimum grade of D-) and (Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 328 or Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 329 with a minimum grade of D-)

Corequisites

EDSE 326 and EDSE 443

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Special Education Major(s)

Course Fee

Assessment Fee Required

EDSE 322 K-12 Methods in Special Education

Instructional and methodological issues in the education of students with exceptionalities. Emphasis is on academic content areas across the curriculum and the development of positive learning environments.
3

Prerequisites

(EDSE 201 or EDSE 203 or Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 327 or Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 442 or EDSE 270 with a minimum grade of D-) and (EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9) and (Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 328 or Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 329 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Special Education Major(s)

EDSE 325 Behavioral Dimensions of Students with Exceptionalities I

This course addresses behavioral theories and their application in creating effective environments and in assessing and managing classroom behavior.
3

EDSE 326 Behavioral Dimensions of Students with Exceptionalities II

Learners will apply the principles of classroom management, assess student behavior, and develop individualized behavior plans that promote positive affective/social/academic growth.
3

Prerequisites

(Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 328 or Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 329 with a minimum grade of D-) and (EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9) and ((EDSE 201 and EDSE 320 and Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 321 and EDSE 325 and Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 443 with a minimum grade of D-))

Corequisites

EDSE 321 and EDSE 443

Course Fee

Assessment Fee Required

EDSE 327 Methods for Teaching Mathematics: Students with Special Needs

Instructional and methodological issues in the education of students with exceptionalities, emphasizing academic content across the curriculum and in the development of positive learning environments.
3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9) and (Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 328 or Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 329 with a minimum grade of D-) and (EDSE 201 and EDSE 203 and EDSE 270 and Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 322 and Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 442 and MATH 182 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Special Education Major(s)

EDSE 328 Field Experience in Special Education: Elementary

Supervised practicum in assessing, planning, and teaching students with exceptional learning needs in collaboration with families, education professionals, and community members. One hundred thirty (130) hours of field experiences required.
3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9) and ((Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 321 and Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 326 and Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 443 with a minimum grade of D-) or (Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 322 and Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 327 and Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 442 with a minimum grade of D-)) and (EDSE 201 and EDSE 203 and EDSE 270 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Special Education Major(s)

Course Fee

Supervision Fee Required

EDSE 329 Field Experience in Special Education: Secondary

Supervised practicum in assessing, planning, and teaching students with exceptional learning needs in collaboration with families, education professionals, and community members. One hundred thirty (130) hours of field experiences required.
3

Prerequisites

(EDSE 270 or EDSE 201 or EDSE 203 with a minimum grade of D-) and (EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9) and ((Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 321 and Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 326 and Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 443 with a minimum grade of D-) or (Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 322 and Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 327 and Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 442 with a minimum grade of D-))

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Special Education Major(s)

Course Fee

Supervision Fee Required

EDSE 331 Typical and Atypical Development of Young Children

The course explores typical and atypical patterns of early child development, birth to eight years; biological, cultural, and environmental influences; and implications for appropriate practice in early childhood special education.
3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

EDSE 332 Appropriate Assessment in Early Childhood Special Education

Formal and informal assessment procedures for children with or at-risk for disabilities, birth to eight years. Emphasis on cross-disciplinary approaches, matching assessment to purposes, and linked assessment/planning systems.
3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9) and (EDSE 201 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Special Education Major(s)

EDSE 333 Evidence-based Practices for Preschool Learners, 3-5 Years

Recommended practices for inclusive education of children ages 3 to 5 with and at risk for disabilities. Emphasis on developmentally appropriate, individually responsive, cross-disciplinary, and evidence-based strategies across developmental domains.
3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9) and (EDSE 201 and EDSE 203 with a minimum grade of D-)

Program Restrictions

Include SpecEd:Early Child SpecEd-BA

EDSE 334 Evidence-based Practices for Young Learners, 5 to 8 Years

Recommended practices for inclusive education of children, 5 to 8 years, with and at-risk for disabilities. Emphasis on developmentally appropriate, individually responsive, cross-disciplinary, and evidence-based practices across developmental domains.
3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9) and (EDSE 431 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Special Education Major(s)

EDSE 360 Adaptation, Modification, and Integration of Curriculum for the Secondary Exceptional Learner

Provides secondary classroom teacher information about special education, exceptional learners, and operational components in Special Education, and techniques for integration of special needs students including modification, adaptation, and specialized resources.
3

Prerequisites

GPA-2.5

EDSE 370 Advanced Field-Based Experience

Advanced supervised teacher apprenticeship experiences (assessing, planning, teaching students with special needs in collaboration with families, education professionals, and community members). School placements may be public or private, K-12.
1- 3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 110 or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9) and (EDSE 170 with a minimum grade of D-)

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

EDSE 371 Action Research Project

Students plan, develop, and evaluate a classroom action research project in consultation with the course instructor. School placements may be public or private, kindergarten through high school. The purpose of this course is to coordinate theory with practice.
1

Prerequisites

(GPA-3.0) and (EDSE 170 with a minimum grade of D-) and (EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9) and (Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 370 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Special Education Major(s)

EDSE 380 Introduction to the Education of the Gifted and Talented

Definitions, characteristics, and needs of diverse groups of gifted/talented children/youth will be covered. Emphasis on identification of these children and the appropriate curriculum/programming options to facilitate their needs.
3

EDSE 411 Assessments to Support the Struggling Reader

This course introduces students to reading assessments that enable teachers to select appropriate instructional methods/materials. Students will become familiar with various reading assessments and common profiles of struggling readers.

3

Prerequisites

(EDSE 320 and EDRD 410 with a minimum grade of D-) and (Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9 or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Special Education Major(s)/Minor(s)

EDSE 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 3

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

EDSE 429 Adaptations for Learners with Exceptionalities in the Elementary Classroom

This course is designed to provide licensure candidates with information about students with disabilities, and other unique needs. This will include current research and practices related to issues in the field of special education such as Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS), Response to Intervention (RtI), Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS), and Universal Design for Learning (UDL). This course will help students identify and adapt instruction for students with a wide range of disabilities and differences.
3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Special Education (and) Elementary Education Major(s)/Minor(s)

EDSE 430 Exceptional Student in the Elementary Classroom

Provide elementary level licensure candidates current research/practices related to students with exceptionalities. Identify/adapt instruction for students with a wide range of disabilities. Field experience will be used extensively.
2

Prerequisites

(GPA-2.75) and (EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

EDSE 431 Introduction to Early Childhood Special Education

Current research and practices related to issues in the field of early childhood special education in inclusionary and naturalistic settings. Information about young learners with exceptionalities, birth to age 8.
3

Prerequisites

GPA-2.75

EDSE 432 Evidence-based Practices for Infants and Toddlers, Birth to 3 Years

Recommended practices for early intervention with infants and toddlers with and at-risk for disabilities, birth to 3 years. Emphasis on developmentally appropriate, individually responsive, cross-disciplinary, and evidence-based practices.
3

Prerequisites

(EDSE 431 with a minimum grade of D-) and (EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Special Education Major(s)

EDSE 433 Exceptional Students in the Regular Classroom

Required of students majoring in Fine Arts, Physical Education, Music Education and Vocational Education. Provides information on handicapped and gifted students, identification procedures and teaching techniques.
2

Prerequisites

GPA-2.5

EDSE 434 Collaborative Practice with Families and Professionals

This course examines principles of collaborative practice in working with families and professionals within early childhood special education contexts.
3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Special Education Major(s)

EDSE 435 Young Children with Significant Support Needs

This course provides strategies for working with young children ages birth to 8 years who have complex learning and behavioral needs due to environmental and/or biological conditions.
3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Special Education Major(s)

EDSE 436 Field Experience in Early Childhood Special Education: Birth to 3 Years

Supervised apprenticeship in assessing and planning learning environments and implementing activities for infants and toddlers with exceptional learning needs in collaboration with families, education professionals, and community members.
3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Special Education Major(s)

EDSE 437 Field Experience in Early Childhood Special Education: 3-8 Years

Supervised apprenticeship in assessing and planning learning environments and implementing activities for children with exceptional learning needs 3- 8 years in collaboration with families, education professionals, and community members.
3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Special Education Major(s)

EDSE 438 Student Teaching in Early Childhood Special Education

Supervised student teaching in assessing, planning, and implementing learning environments for children, birth to eight years.
9-12

Prerequisites

(GPA-3.0) and (Application for Student Tching with a minimum score of 9 or EDSE 130 with a minimum grade of S)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Special Education Major(s)

Course Fee

Supervision Fee Required

EDSE 442 Language and Literacy for Students with Severe Delays

Exploration of lifespan relationships between significant oral language delays, home/school dialectical mismatches, or language differences and the acquisition of literacy in both its oral and written dimensions.
3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9) and (Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 328 or Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 329 with a minimum grade of D-) and (ASLS 266 and EDRD 410 and EDSE 201 and EDSE 203 and EDSE 270 and EDSE 320 and Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 322 and Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 327 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Fee

Assessment Fee Required

EDSE 443 Support Systems in Special Education

Students will acquire skills in case management, facilitating support processes, and delivering direct support within general education settings for students receiving special education services.
3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 120 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9) and (EDSE 201 and EDSE 203 and Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 321 and Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 326 with a minimum grade of D-) and (Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 328 or Concurrent Prerequisite EDSE 329 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Fee

Assessment Fee Required

EDSE 444 Student Teaching in Special Education

Supervised practicum in assessing, planning, and teaching students with exceptional learning needs in collaboration with families, education professionals, and community members.
1-15

Prerequisites

(EDFE 130 with a minimum grade of S or (Application for Student Tching with a minimum score of 9 and Passed Required Praxis with a minimum score of 9)) and (Concurrent Prerequisite EDRD 411 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

Course Fee

Supervision Fee Required

EDSE 460 Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students with Disabilities

Explores language and cultural variables that influence instruction and assessment practices for students with disabilities who come from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.
3

Prerequisites

(GPA-2.75) and (EDSE 201 with a minimum grade of D-)

EED 308 Workshop in Teaching and Learning

Discussion of pedagogical methods for presenting literature and writing content.
3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 110 with a minimum grade of S or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9)

EED 318 Pedagogy and Practices in Social Emotional Learning

Examines theories, current research on, and practical applications for embedding social and emotional learning competencies into discipline-specific content and provides pedagogies to support diverse student needs in the secondary classroom.
3

Prerequisites

(GPA-3.0) and (EED 308 and STEP 161 with a minimum grade of S)

Program Restrictions

Include English:Secondary-BA and English Sec Ed:CLD-BA and English Sec Ed:Eng Lang Lit-BA and English Sec Ed:SPED-BA

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

EED 341 Methods for Teaching Composition in Secondary Schools

Content covers the writing process, composition theory,language and writing development in grades 7-12 with an emphasis on the teaching of writing.
3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 110 or Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9) and (3.0 GPA in ENG courses)

EED 342 Methods and Materials for Teaching Language and Composition in the Elementary School

Content covers the writing process, writing-to-learn, and language and writing development at the elementary level.
3

EED 402 Methods for Teaching Literature in Secondary Schools

Selection of literature for young adults, use of media, curriculum and classroom organization, standards-based education, assessment and evaluation in a secondary school program.
3

Prerequisites

(EDFE 120 or EDFE 125 or Applic for Full Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9) and (ENG 100-599)

ENG 122 College Composition

Extensive practice in writing clear and effective academic prose with special attention to purpose, audience, organization, and style. Instruction in critical analysis and revision.
3

Course Attribute

LC1a-Elementary Composition and GT Intro to Writing

ENG 123 College Research Paper

Instruction in diction, style, logical analysis, research techniques and organization of college level research papers.
3

Prerequisites

(ENG 122 or SAT Verbal with a minimum score of 630 or ACT English with a minimum score of 30 or SAT Reading Test with a minimum score of 34)

Course Attribute

LC1b-Intermediate Composition and GT Intermediate Composition

ENG 131 Introduction to Literature

The study of selected poetry, plays and works of fiction with an emphasis on developing skills in analysis, interpretation and critical thinking.
3

Course Attribute

LC3b-Literature & Humanities and GT Literature

ENG 132 College Composition Enrichment

This one-hour composition enrichment course provides supplemental academic instruction with an emphasis on the relationship of reading and grammar to writing. Students who have scored below 18 on ACT in English, below 470 on SAT in English, and/or have below a 2.75 cumulative high school GPA are encouraged to enroll in this course.
1

Corequisites

ENG 122

ENG 195 Introduction to the Discipline of English

Study of a specific topic designed to train students in the writing and research skills integral to the discipline of English.
3

Prerequisites

(ENG 122 or SAT Verbal with a minimum score of 630 or ACT English with a minimum score of 30 or SAT Reading Test with a minimum score of 34)

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

ENG 200 Introduction to Creative Writing

An introduction to the reading and writing of creative nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama.
3

Prerequisites

(ENG 122 with a minimum grade of C- or ACT English with a minimum score of 30 or SAT Verbal with a minimum score of 630 or SAT Reading Test with a minimum score of 34)

ENG 203 Creative Writing: Nonfiction

An introduction to the reading and writing of creative nonfiction, with a focus on different forms. Includes intensive study of examples of creative nonfiction.
3

Prerequisites

(ENG 122 with a minimum grade of D- or ACT English with a minimum score of 30 or SAT Verbal with a minimum score of 630 or SAT Reading Test with a minimum score of 34)

ENG 204 Children's Literature

Focus on literature by and/or about children.

3

ENG 205 Introduction to Folklore

The study of tales, legends and other lore passed on orally or by customary example in groups bound by common background or experience.  Subtitle may indicate specific group or groups.

3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

ENG 206 Regional Mythologies

The study of different perspectives used to approach regional mythologies with an emphasis on specific cultural implications, universal themes, moral dimensions and ethical consequences that emerge from the narratives.

3

Course Attribute

LC3b-Literature & Humanities and AH2-GT Literature and LC7-International Studies

ENG 211 Survey of American Literature

Study of American Literature from its beginning to the present. Emphasizes the cultural, historical appreciation of selected representative works and contribution of the literature to contemporary life and thought.

3

Course Attribute

LC3b-Literature & Humanities and GT Literature

ENG 213 Survey of British Literature I

Chronological survey of English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the 18th century. This literature will be considered from various perspectives, but with constant attention to its historical context.

3

Course Attribute

LC3b-Literature & Humanities and GT Literature

ENG 214 British Literature II

Survey of British literature from the Romantic Period to the present. Emphasizes close reading of selected major works in historical context.
3

Prerequisites

(ENG 122 with a minimum grade of D- or SAT Verbal with a minimum score of 630 or ACT English with a minimum score of 30 or SAT Reading Test with a minimum score of 34)

Course Attribute

LC3b-Literature & Humanities and GT Literature

ENG 218 Introduction to Linguistics

This course introduces English linguistics (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, language acquisition) with an emphasis on application to young English language learners.

3

ENG 219 Language and Society

An examination of the interaction of language with society and the individual, including how language establishes power, gender, and social identity.
3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

ENG 220 Writing, Transformation, and Change

Study of the fundamentals and practice of rhetoric and writing. Topics include orality and literacy, writing genres, language play, and writing in a post-factual world.
3

Prerequisites

(ENG 122 with a minimum grade of D- or ACT English with a minimum score of 30 or SAT Verbal with a minimum score of 630 or SAT Reading Test with a minimum score of 34)

ENG 225 Communications on a Theme

Topics for writing chosen from ideas of historical influence and/or contemporary problems.
3

Prerequisites

(ENG 122 or SAT Verbal with a minimum score of 630 or ACT English with a minimum score of 30 or SAT Reading Test with a minimum score of 34)

Course Attribute

LC1b-Intermediate Composition and GT Intermediate Composition and Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course may be repeated 2 times

ENG 227 Technical Writing

Analysis of sentence structure, order of presentation and use of illustration in writing essential for the technician, engineer, scientist, with emphasis on arranging and stating information clearly.
3

Prerequisites

(ENG 122 with a minimum grade of D- or SAT Verbal with a minimum score of 630 or ACT English with a minimum score of 30 or SAT Reading Test with a minimum score of 34)

ENG 229 Professional Writing and Digital Video

This course develops proficiency with digital video production. It is designed as an introductory course to filmmaking, rhetorical theory, and visual rhetoric and design principles.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 122 with a minimum grade of D-

ENG 230 Introduction to Comics

An Introduction to comics and print culture, including historical development from the nineteenth-century comic strip to the freestanding graphic novel. Interpretation of visual form, narrative structure, and cultural impact.

3

ENG 236 Ethnic American Literature

Introduce themes and ideas in ethnic American literature by studying representative authors of one or more U.S. ethnicities.
3

Course Attribute

LC3b-Literature & Humanities and LC8-US Multicultural Studies and GT Literature and Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

ENG 239 Topics in Women's Literature

Investigation, from a feminist perspective, of writing by or about women. Figures, nationalities, genres and periods will vary with subtitles.
3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

ENG 242 Creative Writing-Fiction

An introduction to the mechanisms of fiction, with a focus on style and voice. Includes intensive study of contemporary short fiction written in English.
3

ENG 243 Creative Writing: Screenwriting

An introduction to screenwriting for film and television. Students will study oral and written pitches, formal treatments, and screenplay structure and format..
3

Prerequisites

(ENG 122 with a minimum grade of D- or ACT English with a minimum score of 30 or SAT Verbal with a minimum score of 630 or SAT Reading Test with a minimum score of 34)

ENG 244 Creative Writing: Poetry

An introduction to the reading and writing of poetry, with a focus on different poetic forms. Includes intensive study of contemporary poetry in English.
3

Prerequisites

(ENG 122 with a minimum grade of D- or ACT English with a minimum score of 30 or SAT Verbal with a minimum score of 630 or SAT Reading Test with a minimum score of 34)

ENG 250 Introduction to Shakespeare

An introduction to Shakespeare's works for non-majors, including poetry, history, comedy, tragedy, and romance. Includes analyses of selected theatrical productions and film adaptations.

3

Course Attribute

LC3b-Literature & Humanities and AH2-GT Literature

ENG 262 Masterpieces of World Literature

Study of the riches of world literature in translation. Course content will be designated by one of the following subtitles: Continental Masterpieces, Masterpieces of Russian Literature, Masterpieces of the Orient.
3

Course Attribute

LC3b-Literature & Humanities and GT Literature and Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

ENG 263 Western World Literature I

Study of the early literature of Europe and the Americas in translation. Emphasizes the cultural, historical, and formal appreciation of selected representative works and contribution of the literature to contemporary life and thought.
3

ENG 264 Western World Literature II

Study of the modern literature of Europe and the Americas in translation. Emphasizes the cultural, historical, and formal appreciation of selected representative works and contribution of the literature to contemporary life and thought.
3

ENG 295 Approaches to Literary and Cultural Analysis

An in-depth examination of a specific concept or practice in literary and cultural studies. Topics may include "Intertextuality," "Voice," "Social class and social capital," "Allegory."
3

Prerequisites

ENG 122 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

ENG 301 Writing as a Job

Course exposes students to generic knowledge, technologies, and skills needed for professional /technical writers. Units include grant/proposal writing, usability testing, user manuals, and resumes.

3

Prerequisites

(ENG 123 or ENG 225 with a minimum grade of D-)

Special Notes

Course Attribute: Community Engaged Learning

ENG 303 Intermediate Creative Writing: Nonfiction

An intermediate creative nonfiction course. Emphasis on reading and writing personal essays that could be submitted for publication.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 203 with a minimum grade of D-

ENG 318 The Structure of Modern English

A systematic study of the structure of the English language and relevant linguistic concepts, with special focus on morphology (word structure) and syntax (the patterns constitutive of phrases and sentences).

3

ENG 319 Writing and Rhetorical Theory

This advanced writing course is designed to help students study and employ rhetorical concepts that will enable them to write persuasively in a variety of contexts.
3

Prerequisites

(Completion of LC1b-Intermediate Composition course) and (ENG 122 or SAT Verbal with a minimum score of 630 or ACT English with a minimum score of 30 or SAT Reading Test with a minimum score of 34)

ENG 320 History of the English Language

Students will study the history of English from its origins as a Germanic and Indo-European language to the present, with special focus on historical development of modern English varieties.
3

ENG 325 Studies in Fantasy and Science Fiction

Different approaches to the literature of wonder, including concentration on a particular writer, a theme such as women in science fiction, or a historical study of the genre.
3

ENG 327 Editing

Course introduces students to the combination of knowledge, practice, and skills needed to edit professional, peer, and their own writing.
3

Prerequisites

(ENG 122 with a minimum grade of D- or ACT English with a minimum score of 30 or SAT Verbal with a minimum score of 630 or SAT Reading Test with a minimum score of 34)

ENG 328 Professional Writing and Document Design

This course introduces professional genres and technologies. Students compose a green paper, documentation, and a usability report. Technologies include Adobe InDesign and Photoshop. The class requires no previous technology experience.

3

ENG 337 Chicana/o Literature and Theory

In-depth study of contemporary Chicana/o literature and theory. Course will be thematic and will focus on the disciplinary and cultural connections between the literary, the aesthetic, and the theoretical.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 122 with a minimum grade of D-

ENG 338 Sacred Texts as Lit

Study and interpretation of sacred texts, including sections from Hebrew, Christian, and Apocryphal scriptures, using cultural, historical, and literary hermeneutics.
3

Prerequisites

(Completion of LC1b-Intermediate Composition course) and (ENG 122 with a minimum grade of D- or SAT Verbal with a minimum score of 630 or ACT English with a minimum score of 30 or SAT Reading Test with a minimum score of 34)

ENG 342 Intermediate Creative Writing: Fiction

An intermediate workshop course focusing on short fiction. Emphasis on the analysis of the short story form and how it works.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 242 with a minimum grade of D-

ENG 343 Intermediate Creative Writing: Screenwriting

Intermediate study of the screenplay's elements, including premise, plot, subplot, theme, conflict, character, dialogue, and transitions. Students will learn the correct format for a professional screenplay.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 243 with a minimum grade of D-

ENG 344 Intermediate Creative Writing: Poetry

An intermediate workshop course focusing on poetry. Emphasis on the analysis of and experimentation with poetic form, and different voices.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 244 with a minimum grade of D-

ENG 345 Literary Theory and Criticism

This course introduces students to major issues and movements in literary theory and criticism, such as structuralism, post-structuralism, psychoanalysis, Marxism, theories of gender and sexuality, and post-colonial theory.
3

Prerequisites

(ENG 195 with a minimum grade of D-) and (ENG 351 or ENG 349 or ENG 352 or ENG 350 or ENG 353 or ENG 354 or ENG 355 or ENG 356 or ENG 370 or ENG 371 or ENG 372 or ENG 373 or ENG 374 with a minimum grade of D-)

ENG 347 Cultural Theory

A historical survey of the development of cultural studies. The investigation of culture as a symbolic practice, and the various critical methodologies used to interpret cultural texts.
3

ENG 370 Colonial American Literature, 1492-1800

This course provides a survey of early American literature from the age of exploration through the American Revolution.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 195 with a minimum grade of D-

ENG 371 Antebellum American Literature, 1800-1865

This course examines major movements in literature and culture in the decades leading up to the Civil War. Major authors will include Irving, Emerson, Thoreau, Fuller, Douglass, Whitman, & Dickinson.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 195 with a minimum grade of D-

ENG 372 American Realism and the Making of America

This course examines major movements in literature and culture in the decades between 1865 and 1900 focusing on American realism and the making of America.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 195 with a minimum grade of D-

ENG 373 American Modernism and the Crisis of Representation

A study of Modernism and Postmodernism in twentieth-century American literature, with particular emphasis on innovations in literary form.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 195 with a minimum grade of D-

ENG 374 American Diaspora and Globalization

This course provides a survey of late nineteenth through early twenty-first century American literature focusing on the themes of globalization and diaspora.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 195 with a minimum grade of D-

ENG 375 Literature and the Environment

Explore human relationships with nature writing from various periods and cultures. Economic, scientific, philosophic and religious attitudes emerge from attitudes about nature. Do these influence human treatment of natural things? Explore human relationships with nature writing from various periods and cultures. Economic, scientific, philosophic and religious attitudes emerge from attitudes about nature. Do these influence human treatment of natural things?
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENG 375 and ENST 375

ENG 380 Medieval Literature

This course is designed to introduce students to the literature and language of the Middle English period through a historical approach in order to develop a more sophisticated understanding of the distinction and relationship between text and context.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 195 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

ENG 381 Renaissance Literature

Discuss significant literary movements, genres, and themes of Tudor and Stuart England. Possible themes include: "Renaissance epic from Spenser to Milton" and "Sex, money, and gender in early modern England."
3

Prerequisites

ENG 195 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

ENG 382 Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature

This course explores the ways in which eighteenth century literature engaged with and reflected on Britain’s emergence as a leading colonial and mercantilist power, the New Sciences, party politics, and notions of the modern self, among many other related topics.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 195 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

ENG 383 Romanticism

This course will explore topics related to Romantic-era literature and culture in Britain from roughly the period 1798-1832.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 195 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

ENG 384 Victorian Literature and Culture

This course will explore topics related to Victorian-era literature and culture in Britain from roughly the period 1832-1901.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 195 with a minimum grade of D-

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

ENG 385 Twentieth-Century and Contemporary Literature

Study of British fiction, poetry, non-fiction, and A/V texts from WWI to present. Emphasis on social, cultural, and political contexts that shape literary movements and production. Authors may include Shaw, Joyce, Yeats, Kazuo Ishiguro, China Mièville, and Zadie Smith.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 195 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

ENG 395 Studies in Literature, Theory and Writing

Focus on a critical, rhetorical,or literary problem or theme.
3

Prerequisites

(ENG 122 or SAT Verbal with a minimum score of 630 or ACT English with a minimum score of 30 or SAT Reading Test with a minimum score of 34) and (Completion of LC1b-Intermediate Composition course)

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

ENG 400 Special Topics in Literary and Cultural Theory

This course allows students to explore a specific problematic in literary theory and criticism, drawing from more than one theoretical movement, such as structuralism, post-structuralism, psychoanalysis, Marxism, theories of gender and sexuality, and post-colonial theory. May or may not involve reading literary texts.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 345 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

ENG 419 English Linguistics

A survey of general linguistics as applied to the history of the English language. Includes vocabulary and dictionary study, regional and social dialects, semantics and pragmatics, childhood acquisition of language.
3

ENG 420 Special Topics in Creative and Professional Writing

Study of language choices in a wide variety of texts that meet specific rhetorical situations.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 319 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

ENG 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 3

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

ENG 427 Digital Editing

Content includes the history of scholarly editing, study of different editorial approaches and principles, and the construction of a digital scholarly edition.

3

Prerequisites

ENG 195 with a minimum grade of D-

ENG 429 Digital Self-Publishing

This course reviews professional design software and expands knowledge of visual rhetoric and design. Students prepare for the job market by assembling a professional portfolio via a CMS site.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 229 with a minimum grade of D-

ENG 441 Colloquium in Literature

Intensive focus on a critical and/or literary problem, discourse, theme, genre or individual author.
3

Prerequisites

(ENG 195 and ENG 345 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

ENG 442 Advanced Creative Writing-Fiction

An advanced workshop course focusing on short fiction. Emphasis on the analysis of the short story form and how it works.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 342 with a minimum grade of D-

ENG 444 Advanced Creative Writing - Poetry

An advanced course in the reading and writing of poetry, with attention to different poetic forms and their history; the current publication scene in American poetry; an examination of print and on line journals; the preparation of a chapbook manuscript. Includes intensive study of contemporary poetry in English as well as a sampling of contemporary world poetry in translation. Includes poetry workshops almost every week.
3

Prerequisites

ENG 344 with a minimum grade of D-

ENG 492 Writing Internship

One semester of work in public or private agencies, such as state government offices, non-profit organizations, publishing companies, newspapers, magazines, advertising agencies, or related organizations. 135 hours across the semester for 3 credits. Pro-rated hours for 1 and 2 credit versions.

1-3

Prerequisites

(GPA-3.0) and (ENG 123 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include ENGL/WRIT Major(s)/Minor(s)

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 3 credit hours

ENG 495 Advanced Cultural Studies

An intensive study of one particular cultural phenomenon from a variety of critical perspectives.
3

Prerequisites

(ENG 345 or ENG 347 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

ENST 100 Introduction to Environmental Studies

Explore the nature of environmental problems and gain an overall understanding of the complexity of these problems
3

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and GT Physical & Life Sciences

ENST 178 Food Preparation and Preservation Techniques

An introduction to basic culinary and food preservation techniques and management of garden vegetables.
3

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ENST 201 Food Systems and Agrarian Change

Explore the tensions between individual and collective action of Food Systems in relation to social and agrarian change.
3

ENST 205 Environment, Politics and Law

Analysis of the causes and proposed solutions of environmental problems and of environmental issues and their political resolution.
3

ENST 209 International Sustainable Development

Overview of the Sustainable Development focusing on its origins and meanings in both theory and practice. A geographic focus on countries in the Global South, exploring how sustainable development policies and programs have impacted levels of poverty and inequality, use of natural resources, as well as rural and urban livelihoods.
3

Prerequisites

ENST 100 with a minimum grade of D-

ENST 215 Human Behavior and Environment

Examine interrelationships between human behavior and the environment. Review personal, social and structural dimensions of everyday life relating to the environment. Understand environmental problems and consider alternative behavior models.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 215 and SOC 215

ENST 225 Energy and the Environment

Study past, present and future methods of energy production and limitations imposed by the laws of physics. Discuss applications to transportation, home and industry. Taught by the Physics department.
3

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and GT Physical & Life Sciences

ENST 235 Chemistry and the Environment

Study the chemistry of natural waters, the atmosphere, and geosphere and the chemicals used for agriculture, industry, home, and energy production that pollute them.
3

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and GT Physical & Life Sciences

ENST 249 Controversies in Agriculture, Food, and Farming

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach toward understanding modern and traditional agriculture, and the ways in which these agricultural forms both clash and coalesce.
3

ENST 261 Water Quality Management

Learn about the water cycle and how water moves through an environment. Students will build an understanding of how to identify pollutants within water and be able to assess different ways in which contaminants can be eliminated.
3

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite ENST 100 with a minimum grade of D-

ENST 265 Conservation of Natural Resources

Learn the characteristics of the major natural resources and the scientific basis behind current resource use practices. The environmental consequences of their use and abuse will be emphasized.
3

ENST 270 Professional Development

Explore career options for geography and environmental studies majors and practice professional development skills.

3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 270 and GEOG 270

ENST 272 Environmental Conflict Resolution

Explore the nature of environmental conflict and work toward understanding the range of processes and skills used to resolve them.
3

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite ENST 100 with a minimum grade of D-

ENST 283 The Psychology of Sustainability

An introduction to the study of the psychological relationships that exists between humans and the environment. Students will learn what attitudes, values and ethics humans have in terms of the natural world.
3

ENST 315 Nature & Society

Analyze problems in nature-society relationships by exploring geographic theory surrounding environmental politics, surveying local and global actors in these conflicts, and addressing varied contemporary issues in resource management.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 315 and GEOG 315

ENST 320 American Environmental Worldviews

An exploration and analysis of the historical development of perceptions and worldviews about the environment and the natural world using the United States as a case study.
3

ENST 321 Introduction to Environmental Impact Assessment

This course examines principles, procedures, methods, and applications of environmental impact assessment. Specific emphasis is on the history and implementation of the NEPA in the USA with some discussion of international impact assessment.
3

Prerequisites

SCI 291 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

ENST 326 Africa

Identify and analyze relationships between the physical and cultural patterns, including land use, resource development, social, political and economic problems.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 326 and GEOG 326

ENST 331 Anthropology and Contemporary Human Problems

Anthropological perspectives and methods are used to critically examine the assumptions and actions underlying social and environmental contemporary human problems as well as those involved in efforts to address them.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 331 and ANT 331

ENST 335 Environmental and Resource Economics

Students will examine the strengths and weaknesses of economic theory in analyzing the seriousness of resource and environmental issues facing society.
3

Prerequisites

ECON 205 with a minimum grade of D-

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 335 and ECON 335

ENST 340 Agroecology and Food Sovereignty

Explore community-based approaches to designing sustainable food systems that draw from permaculture and urban agriculture principles and strategies.
3

Prerequisites

ENST 100 with a minimum grade of D-

ENST 341 Permaculture and Urban Farming

Explore community-based approaches to designing sustainable food systems that draw from permaculture and urban agriculture principles and strategies.
3

Prerequisites

ENST 100 with a minimum grade of D-

ENST 345 Environmental Geography: Earth at Risk

Examine selected environmental issues, including climate change, environmental degradation, and resource depletion, focusing on the physical processes underlying these problems and how human activities contribute to environmental problems.
3

Prerequisites

(GEOG 220 or GEOG 230 with a minimum grade of D-)

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 345 and GEOG 345

ENST 355 Introduction to Environmental Health

Discussion of the relationships of environmental pollution to the ecosystem and health of humans. Analyze major areas of environmental pollution: water, air, solid wastes, pesticides, radioactive wastes and population.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 355 and HUSR 350

ENST 356 Water Resource Economics

Examination of economic principles governing water planning, development and law. Discussion of supply and demand, quality and political issues. Relationship to Colorado and local situation.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 356 and ECON 356

ENST 360 Environmental Justice

Examination of the unequal distribution of environmental risks and benefits across populations, the environmental justice movement, environmental policies and regulatory practices.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 360 and SOC 360

ENST 364 Leadership and Community Building

Understand the leadership role of the individual and groups in building sustainable communities that enhance and capacity building for positive societal change.
3

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite ENST 100 with a minimum grade of D-

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 364 and LEAD 364

ENST 375 Literature and the Environment

Explore human relationships with nature writing from various periods and cultures. Economic, scientific, philosophic and religious attitudes emerge from attitudes about nature. Do these influence human treatment of natural things?
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 375 and ENG 375

ENST 378 Energy Policy and Economics

This course examines the dominant trends and challenges affecting energy systems and policy around the world, including the evolution and economics of fossil fuels, alternative energy technologies, and clean energy policies.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 378 and ECON 378

ENST 380 Sustainable Geographies

Examine the sustainability of contemporary living patterns. Explore alternative approaches to meeting transportation, domestic power and heating, food production and waste disposal needs on the personal and community levels.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 380 and GEOG 380

ENST 382 Sustainability and Capitalism

Use case studies to explore a general overview of commerce, economics, and business as it relates to the environment and human interactions.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 382 and ECON 382

ENST 385 Art and the Environment

Investigate and participate in the process of art as it relates to the different environments of human existence.
3

ENST 389 Human Perception of the Built Environment

Exploration of human perception as it adapts to the built environment, including theories of environmental psychology.
3

Prerequisites

(ENST 100 or ENST 215 with a minimum grade of D-)

ENST 390 Building Materials for a Sustainable Environment

Exploration of materials used in the built environment including: Properties and characteristics of a material, sustainable features, history of use, fabrication process, common uses for the material, and installation methods.
3

Prerequisites

ENST 100 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

ENST 391 The Built Environment and Sustainability

Exploration of the built environment including the characteristics of sustainability in: site selection, recyclable and renewable resources, embodied energy, building materials, and indoor air quality.
3

Prerequisites

ENST 100 with a minimum grade of D-

ENST 405 Senior Seminar

Discuss current environmental issues in depth and in detail, on the basis of student background, library resources, interviews and guest speakers. Individuals and small groups analyze and present problems.
3

Course Attribute

Community Engaged Learning

ENST 411 Conservation Project Design and Planning

Provides students with the skills and knowledge to design and implement effective conservation projects and to generate clear evidence of their progress toward achieving conservation results.

3

Prerequisites

SCI 291 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

ENST 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 3

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

ENST 440 Biogeography

Identify meaningful patterns in the distributions of plants and animals and explain how/ why those patterns developed. Includes an examination of the role humans have played in shaping those patterns.
3

Prerequisites

(ENST 100 or GEOG 220 or GEOG 230 with a minimum grade of D-)

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 440 and GEOG 440

ENST 444 Global Climate Change

An examination of what causes climate to change across different time scales; how climate has changed in the past; how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate; and the consequences of climate change for our planet. One field trip required.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 444 and GEOG 444

ENST 451 Food Systems Field Learning

This course is a base to accompany an experiential practicum in organic farming and gardening.
2- 3

ENST 460 Sociology of Disasters

Determinants and consequences of behavior and response to environmental extremes, technological emergencies, and acts of mass violence.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 460 and SOC 460

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

ENST 490 Capstone Proposal

Introduces the research process through identification and framing of a research proposal following accepted and standard protocols. Topics include hypothesis formulation and testing, designing a research project, and career preparedness. 

 

2

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 490 and GEOG 490

Program Restrictions

Include Environ/Sustain Studies-BA

Class Restriction

Include Senior

ENST 491 Senior Capstone

Research selected environmental and geographic topics based on ENST/GEOG 490 Proposal. Course focuses on the assessment of students' environmental and geographic knowledge base, research and analysis skills.

2

Prerequisites

ENST 490 with a minimum grade of D-

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ENST 491 and GEOG 491

Program Restrictions

Include Environ/Sustain Studies-BA

Class Restriction

Include Senior

ENST 492 Internship in Environmental Studies

Permission of Environmental Studies coordinator. Practical experience and training in areas related to the environment. Credit hours and nature of experience arranged individually.
1- 4

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 15 credit hours

ENST 493 Engagement and Service Learning Practicum

Give students experience in community engagement and service learning through a real community immersion process.
1- 4

Prerequisites

ENST 364 with a minimum grade of D-

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

ENST 494 Practicum in ENST College Instruction

Experience in assisting in instruction of an introductory environmental studies course. S/U graded.
1- 2

Prerequisites

ENST 100 with a minimum grade of D-

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Environmental Concentration(s)

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

ENST 495 Special Topics in Environmental Studies/Sustainability

Study for undergraduate and graduate students in various topics of sustainability.
1- 3

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

ESCI 101 Earth's Climate System

Introduction to Earth’s climate system. Formation and characteristics of the atmosphere and oceans. Impact of climate change on severe weather, watersheds, groundwater and glaciers.

4

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and SC2-GT Physical & Life Sciences

ESCI 150 Our Violent Earth

Examines the causes, effects, and options available to respond to and potentially mitigate the effects of natural disasters such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunami, landslides, severe weather, and floods. Differing impacts in developing and industrialized countries will be discussed. 

3

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and SC2-GT Physical & Life Sciences

ESCI 200 Introduction to Environmental Earth Science

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) An exploration of the complex changes in Earth's environment, the science behind these changes, and impacts on human populations requiring interdisciplinary strategies to solve problems.
4

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and LCLB-Science Lab Course and GT Physical & Life Science

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ESCI 265 Earth Science Concepts for Elementary Teachers

(2 lecture, 2 laboratory) An investigation of basic concepts in the Earth Sciences through lecture, discussion and laboratory investigations. This course is ideal for those seeking elementary teacher certification.
3

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and LCLB-Science Lab Course and GT Physical & Life Science

Course Fee

Course Fee Required and Participation Fee Required

ESCI 320 Earth Materials

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Investigation of rock and mineral chemistry, formation, identification, and significance to society. Focus on clay and analytical instrumentation. Field trip(s) required.
4

Prerequisites

GEOL 201 with a minimum grade of D-

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ESCI 320 and GEOL 320

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ESCI 330 Earth Science Statistical Analysis

(2 lecture, 3 laboratory) Course covers research methods, statistical analysis, manipulation and presentation of data. Multiple projects using and solving authentic Earth & Atmospheric Science data and research problems.
3

Prerequisites

(GEOL 201 or MET 205 or ESCI 200 with a minimum grade of D-)

ESCI 349 Earth Science Professional Seminar

Preparation for graduate school or job market. Includes finding jobs, internships, and/or appropriate graduate schools; also cover letters, resumes, GRE preparation, phone and in-person interviews, and expectations. S/U grading.
1

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Earth Sciences Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

ESCI 365 Advanced Earth Science Concepts for Elementary Teachers

(2 lecture, 2 laboratory) Students will expand their knowledge of Earth Science and learn methods for teaching earth science including integration of other subject areas.
3

Prerequisites

SCI 266 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ESCI 420 Chemistry of the Earth System

Distribution, characteristics, and interaction of elements and related ions in the Earth system with an overview of analytical techniques. Emphasis on geochemical cycles as related to use in human society.

4

Prerequisites

(CHEM 111 and CHEM 112 and GEOL 201 with a minimum grade of D-)

ESCI 472 Industrial Safety

Industrial safety covers the theory of historical occupational hazards, current safety issues, agencies that regulate workplace hazards, accident causation and prevention, and training needed for the workplace.
3

Prerequisites

(CHEM 111 and CHEM 111L with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

ESCI 474 Principles of Hydrology

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Students will quantify and model the movement of water within the hydrologic cycle, focusing on the surface water component. The course will consist of lectures, laboratories, field projects, and presentations. Two field trips are required.
4

Prerequisites

Concurrent Prerequisite MATH 131 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Participation Fee Required

ESCI 490 Colloquium in Earth Sciences

Invited speakers, including faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates, present current earth science research topics in seminar format. Students also learn about STEM-based career paths and internship opportunities. ESCI 490 is a one-credit course that is graded as pass/fail.

1

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

ESCI 491 Geoscience Field Issues

Analysis and investigation of contemporary issues and development of research skills in the field of earth sciences, atmospheric sciences, environmental sciences, or geosciences. The course may include extensive field work.
1- 6

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Supervision Fee Required

ESCI 492 Earth Science Internship

Internship in a public agency or private firm to provide professional experience under the supervision of an area specialist. S/U graded.
1-15

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 15 credit hours

ESCI 496 Earth Science Study Abroad

Exploration of contemporary issues associated with natural hazards, resources and environmental change impacting society, culture, and diverse ecosystems at international sites. Research skill development in geology, meteorology, and environmental sciences.
1- 6

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

ESCI 497 Undergraduate Research

Original research in the earth sciences conducted under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Results of the investigation are to be presented both in a written report and orally.
1- 4

Repeatable Status

Course isrepeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

ET 100 Computer Applications for Composition

Word processing, graphics and stylistic analysis applications to improve student's writing process. Includes CAI tutorials and tests.
1

ET 247 Technology in Education for Elementary Teaching

Instruction and practice using a variety of technology tools. A primary focus is on the application of these tools and related concepts (intellectual freedom, critical viewing skills, technology access and equity, etc.) within the elementary classroom.
1

ET 340 Integration of Technology into Content and Pedagogy

Explore theories/frameworks that support integration of technology in teaching and learning. Apply practices to promote seamless integration of technology that adds significant value to students' learning of elementary curriculum.
2

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Elementary Education Major(s)

ET 347 Educational Technology Applications for Elementary Teaching

Integration of various instructional delivery systems within teaching. Content-specific and elementary applications of computing, video, print, hypermedia and multimedia, telecommunications technologies and issues relevant to the elementary education community.
1

Prerequisites

ET 247 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

ET 422 Directed Study

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 3

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

ET 449 Integrating Technologies into Secondary Education Pedagogy

Apply technology tools in teaching practices to promote technology integration that is seamless and adds significant value to students' learning of secondary curriculum. Investigate theoretical and practical issues and methods.
3

EUR 316 Continental European Storytelling

Explore folk stories, fairy tales, and other traditional European narratives, from their origins in oral storytelling to modern literary forms that transmit and transform folk traditions for modern readers.
3

Prerequisites

(GER 102 or FR 102 or SPAN 102 or FL 195 with a minimum grade of D-)

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

EUR 317 European Culture and Identity

Study of literature addressing perceptions of cultural affinity and difference among nations and ethnicities within Europe and at its frontiers. Possible factors for consideration may include race, nationalism, religion, gender, socioeconomic class, (im)migration and minorities.
3

Prerequisites

(FR 102 or GER 102 or SPAN 102 or FL 195 with a minimum grade of D-)

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

EUR 318 Europe at War

Examine the experience of war, portrayed in literature and/or film, which has played a transformative and traumatic role in the political and human geography of continental Europe.
3

Prerequisites

(FR 102 or GER 102 or SPAN 102 or FL 195 with a minimum grade of D-)

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

EUR 319 Germanic and Romance Linguistic Studies

This course is devoted to the analysis of similarities, developments, and divergences among related dialects and/or branches of Western European languages.
3

Prerequisites

(FR 102 or GER 102 or SPAN 102 or FL 195 with a minimum grade of D-)

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

EUR 416 Public and Personal Revolutions

This course examines expressions of dissent in literature against prevailing institutions and ideas, which has made "revolution" an integral concept in Western understanding of social progress. Topics may include religious dissent, class conflict, clashing ideologies, and social inequality.
3

Prerequisites

(FR 202 or GER 202 or SPAN 202 or FL 295 with a minimum grade of D-)

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

EUR 417 The Individual in the System

This course examines the origins and emergence of individualism in Europe, as portrayed in literature and film, including its conflict with the continental interest in a cohesive social order.
3

Prerequisites

(FR 202 or GER 202 or SPAN 202 or FL 295 with a minimum grade of D-)

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

EUR 418 The Western Mind

Focused study of one intellectual school, problem, or other discourse tradition reflected in literature, which has contributed significantly to contemporary European perception and values.
3

Prerequisites

(FR 202 or GER 202 or SPAN 202 or FL 295 with a minimum grade of D-)

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

FILM 120 Introduction to Film

(3 lecture, 1 film screening) Learning to analyze film and appreciate film as art by looking at a variety of styles, genres, and ideological directions in Hollywood and non-Hollywood films.
3

Corequisites

FILM 121

Course Attribute

LC3a-Arts and GT Arts

FILM 121 Screening For Film 120

Required once per week screening time to complement Film 120.
0

Corequisites

FILM 120

FILM 210 History of Film I

(3 lecture, 1 film screening) A survey of film history from its beginnings to 1945, focusing on cinema's development from aesthetic, social, technological, and economic perspectives. Includes selected issues in film theory.
3

Corequisites

FILM 220

FILM 211 History of Film II

(3 lecture, 1 film screening) A survey of cinema from 1945 to the present day. This course will study innovations in technology and production as well as formal developments in narrative, editing, cinematography, and sound.
3

Corequisites

FILM 221

FILM 220 Screening For Film 210

Required once per week screening time to complement FILM 210.
0

Corequisites

FILM 210

FILM 221 Screening For Film 211

Required once per week screening time to complement FILM 211.
0

Corequisites

FILM 211

FILM 230 Introduction to Filmmaking

This hands-on course introduces students to the basics of the short-film production process: from scripting, development, shooting, editing, to marketing.

3

Prerequisites

FILM 120 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

FILM 310 Film Theory and Criticism

A historical survey of film theories and criticism, including formalist and structuralist, psychoanalytic, feminist, and queer theory. Genre theory and theories of spectator-ship and audience response will also be considered.
3

Prerequisites

FILM 120 with a minimum grade of D-

Corequisites

FILM 311

FILM 311 Screening For Film 310

Required once per week film screening time to complement FILM 310.
0

Corequisites

FILM 310

FILM 320 Special Topics in Film

(3 lecture, 1 film screening) This course will allow students to study a particular area of film criticism, history, or theory, or consider a specific national cinema.
3

Corequisites

FILM 321

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

FILM 321 Screening For Film 320

Required once per week screening time to complement FILM 320.
0

Corequisites

FILM 320

FILM 330 Studies in a Genre or Director

(3 lecture, 1 film screening) An introduction to key theories and methods of analysis in genre studies or auteur theory, focusing on a particular genre or a particular director.
3

Corequisites

FILM 331

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

FILM 331 Screening For Film 330

Required once per week film screening time to complement FILM 330.
0

Corequisites

FILM 330

FILM 350 Advanced Filmmaking

A hands-on course in advanced visual and aural storytelling through the medium of cinema.

3

Prerequisites

(FILM 230 or ENG 229 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

FILM 400 Teaching Film

This course introduces methods of teaching and using film in the classroom. It emphasizes theories of film pedagogy and includes actual classroom practice
3

Prerequisites

FILM 120 with a minimum grade of D-

Corequisites

FILM 401

FILM 401 Screening for Film 400

Required once per week screening time to complement FILM 400.
0

Corequisites

FILM 400

FL 195 Elementary World Language

For students with no previous experience with the target language. Develop four language skills, especially speaking. Stresses practical communication, comprehension, pronunciation, fluency and cultural awareness.
5

Course Attribute

LC7-International Studies and Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

FL 295 Intermediate World Language

For students with previous experience with the target language. Develop four language skills, especially speaking. Stresses practical communication, comprehension, pronunciation, fluency, and cultural awareness.
3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

FL 296 Study Abroad Experience

Gain, through experiential learning abroad, the skills and appreciation of another country's culture, language, and political and societal institutions, in order to become a more responsible and active participant in our diverse and global society. S/U graded.
3

Course Attribute

LC7-International Studies and Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 2 times

FL 395 Special Topics

Explore a special topic related to foreign language study. Conducted in English or in any language taught in the Department of Foreign Languages.
1- 4

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

FL 440 Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages in K-6

Designed to prepare future foreign language teachers to teach at the kindergarten through sixth grade levels.
3

FL 441 Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages in K-12

Emphasize standard-based teaching and learning methods, curriculum and classroom organization and design, testing and evaluation, procedures and materials, relationship of subject area to K-12 teaching program.
3

Prerequisites

Applic for Initial Adm to PTEP with a minimum score of 9

FND 210 Medical Terminology

Terminology used in medical sciences. Development of medical vocabulary.
2

FND 225 Interprofessional Collaboration in Healthcare

An interdisciplinary approach promoting wellness and using discipline-specific processes to plan healthcare interventions. Perspectives from disciplines are explored emphasizing collaborative communication, teamwork, and client-centered care. Simulation labs included.
3

Prerequisites

(BIO 245 or BIO 350 with a minimum grade of D-)

FND 245 Introduction to Nutrition

For dietetics students and those desiring a focus on the science of nutrition. Functions, metabolism, and sources of nutrients will be studied applying recommendations and an evidence-based approach.
3

Prerequisites

(CHEM 111L or CHEM 111 with a minimum grade of D-)

FND 250 Principles of Nutrition

Investigation of the principles of nutrition as applied to humans.
3

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and GT Physical & Life Sciences

FND 252 Nutrition in the Life Cycle

Nutrition applied to the various stages of life, from conception to the later years. Socioeconomic, psychological, physiological factors affecting food intake.
3

Prerequisites

(FND 250 or FND 245 with a minimum grade of D-)

FND 310 Introduction to Foods

Laboratory required. Study of the chemical and physical properties of food and the effects of processing, preparation, preservation and storage.
2

Prerequisites

(FND 245 or FND 250 with a minimum grade of D-)

Corequisites

FND 310L

FND 310L Introduction to Foods Laboratory

(4 laboratory) Application of food science principles (chemical and physical properties) to food preparation, objective and subjective evaluation, and recipe modification.
2

Prerequisites

(FND 245 or FND 250 with a minimum grade of D-)

Corequisites

FND 310

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

FND 320 Nutrition Applications in Foodservice

Laboratory required. Study of health, cultural, economic, culinary arts and contemporary nutritional concepts in quantity foodservice applications.
2

Prerequisites

(FND 310L or FND 310 with a minimum grade of D-)

Corequisites

FND 320L

FND 320L Nutrition Applications in Foodservice Laboratory

(2 laboratory) Laboratory to accompany FND 320.
1

Prerequisites

(FND 310L or FND 310 with a minimum grade of D-)

Corequisites

FND 320

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

FND 335 Breastfeeding: Benefits, Support and Promotion

Advanced study of breastfeeding benefits, support and promotion within the field of food, nutrition and dietetics.
2

Prerequisites

(FND 245 or FND 250 with a minimum grade of D-)

FND 360 Nutrition and Aging

Advanced study of physiological and biological changes occurring with aging on nutrition status, nutrient requirements, and physical ability; with emphasis on the relationship between optimal nutrition, activity, and successful aging.
3

Prerequisites

(FND 245 or FND 250 with a minimum grade of D-)

FND 370 Nutrition Education and Application Strategies

Nutrition education and application strategies to enhance dietary change.
3

Prerequisites

FND 252 with a minimum grade of D-

FND 395 Special Topics in Food, Nutrition and Dietetics

Advanced study of variable topics within the field of food, nutrition and dietetics.
1- 3

Prerequisites

(FND 245 or FND 250 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

FND 410 Professional Development Seminar

Development of the dietetic profession. Examination of topics in nutrition and dietetics not covered in previous coursework. S/U graded.
2

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Dietetics (and) Didactic Dietetics Ed Major(s)

FND 420 Maternal and Child Nutrition

Developmental stages, nutrient requirements, appropriate diet and eating behaviors for children from conception through school age. Nutrition related conditions of children and nutrition for the pregnant and lactating woman.
3

Prerequisites

FND 252 with a minimum grade of D-

FND 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 3

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Class Restriction

Include Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

FND 430 Nutrition Assessment and Intervention

Nutrition assessment and intervention during acute and chronic disease. Theory and practical application presented.
2

Prerequisites

(FND 210 and FND 252 with a minimum grade of D-) and (BIO 245 or BIO 350 with a minimum grade of D-)

Corequisites

FND 430L

FND 430L Nutrition Assessment and Intervention Laboratory

(2 laboratory) Laboratory to accompany FND 430. Practical application of the Nutrition Care Process, including nutrition assessment methods, intervention methods, documentation and case studies.
1

Prerequisites

(FND 210 and FND 252 with a minimum grade of D-) and (BIO 245 or BIO 350 with a minimum grade of D-)

Corequisites

FND 430

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

FND 431 Medical Nutrition Intervention

The study of nutrition for prevention and treatment of disease and health conditions with integration of pathophysiology is covered.
2

Prerequisites

(FND 430L or FND 430 with a minimum grade of D-)

Corequisites

FND 431L

FND 431L Medical Nutrition Intervention Laboratory

(2 laboratory) Practical application of the Nutrition Care Process in acute and chronic disease. Theory and practical application are presented.
1

Prerequisites

(FND 430L or FND 430 with a minimum grade of D-)

Corequisites

FND 431

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

FND 446 Foodservice Systems Management

Systems approach applied to commercial and noncommercial food service facilities including: procurement, production, distribution, service and maintenance. Management of food service operations.
3

Prerequisites

(FND 320L or FND 320 with a minimum grade of D-) and (FND 252 with a minimum grade of D-)

Corequisites

FND 446L

FND 446L Foodservice Systems Management Laboratory

(3 laboratory) Laboratory to accompany FND 446.
1

Prerequisites

(FND 320L or FND 320 with a minimum grade of D-) and (FND 252 with a minimum grade of D-)

Corequisites

FND 446

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

FND 451 Advanced Nutrition

Metabolic, physiological and biochemical functions of nutrients and sub cellular components and their role in maintaining the integrity of the organism.
3

Prerequisites

(FND 245 with a minimum grade of C- or FND 250 with a minimum grade of D-) and (BIO 245 with a minimum grade of C- or BIO 350 with a minimum grade of D-) and (CHEM 281 with a minimum grade of D- or (CHEM 381 with a minimum grade of C- and CHEM 381L with a minimum grade of D-) or CHEM 381 with a minimum grade of C- or (CHEM 281 and CHEM 281L with a minimum grade of D-))

FND 452 Community Nutrition

Systemic analysis of community food and nutrition problems and programs. Role of public and private sectors in community health promotion.
3

Prerequisites

FND 252 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

Community Engaged Learning

FND 455 Nutrition for Fitness and Athletic Performance

The study of nutrition principles as they apply to the promotion of optimal physical fitness and athletic performance. Current research and evaluation of nutritional recommendations will be stressed.
3

Prerequisites

(FND 250 or FND 245 with a minimum grade of D-)

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

FR 101 Elementary French I

For students with no previous French. Develop four language skills, especially speaking. Stresses practical communication, comprehension, pronunciation, fluency and cultural awareness.
5

Course Attribute

LC7-International Studies

FR 102 Elementary French II

Continuation of FR 101 or equivalent. Develop four language skills, especially speaking. Stresses practical communication, comprehension, pronunciation, fluency and cultural awareness.
5

Prerequisites

FR 101 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

LC7-International Studies

FR 116 Contemporary France

Become familiar with the culture and society of France with special emphasis on contemporary French issues. Conducted in English.
3

Course Attribute

LC7-International Studies

FR 201 Intermediate French I

Review language structures and develop reading and writing skills. Gain vocabulary through conversational practice on topics of cultural interest.
3

Prerequisites

FR 102 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

LC3d-World Languages and LC7-International Studies and GT Foreign Languages

FR 202 Intermediate French II

Review language structures and develop reading and writing skills. Gain vocabulary through conversational practice on topics of cultural and literary interest.
3

Prerequisites

FR 201 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

LC3d-World Languages and LC7-International Studies and GT Foreign Languages

FR 301 France & Francophonie I

Develop fluency in writing and conversation skills and build vocabulary through discussions and compositions about a variety of cultural texts and media.
3

Prerequisites

FR 202 with a minimum grade of D-

FR 302 France & Francophonie II

Acquire advanced writing and conversation skills and build vocabulary through discussions and compositions about a variety of cultural texts and media.
3

Prerequisites

FR 202 with a minimum grade of D-

FR 311 French Civilization and Literature Survey I

Study of French civilization from prehistoric times up through the eighteenth century, including the historical, geographical, economic, political, artistic and literary development of France. Conducted in French.
3

Prerequisites

FR 202 with a minimum grade of D-

FR 312 French Civilization and Literature Survey II

Study of French civilization from the French Revolution to the present, including the historical, economic, political, social, artistic and literary development of France. Conducted in French.
3

Prerequisites

FR 202 with a minimum grade of D-

FR 407 French Phonetics and Oral Proficiency

Intermediate oral proficiency in French required. Designed to develop oral proficiency through intensive phonetic training, and by exposing students to advanced and superior linguistic functions. This course prepares students for the Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI).
3

Prerequisites

FR 202 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 1 times

FR 411 France Then and Now

Study the importance of selected periods of French history. Examine the role and the art, literature and philosophy of these periods in the development of contemporary French civilization.
3

Prerequisites

FR 202 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

FR 412 French Politics and Society

Study the political and social systems of modern France. Learn of France's involvement in the European Community and the implications of this involvement for French politics and society.
3

Prerequisites

FR 202 with a minimum grade of D-

FR 413 The Francophone World

Study the differing cultures of countries and/or regions of the non-European francophone world, in particular Quebec, the French West Indies, and French speaking Africa.
3

Prerequisites

FR 202 with a minimum grade of D-

FR 414 Language and Society

Study areas of the evolving French language relative to contemporary French society. Topics include commercial French, French in the popular press, familiar language and slang, and regionalism.
3

Prerequisites

FR 202 with a minimum grade of D-

FR 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 4

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

FR 440 Advanced Linguistic Studies

An in-depth study of the French language in the context of Francophone societies. Topics may include language development over time, linguistic register, language policy, phonology, morphology, the evolving lexicon, slang, regional languages & dialects, and French around the globe.

3

Prerequisites

FR 300-399 with a minimum grade of D-

FR 450 Readings in French Literature

Study the masterpieces and literary movements of French literature. Learn to read and discuss complete works of literature in French. Acquire the skills to write research papers on course topics.
3

Prerequisites

FR 202 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

FR 475 Research Seminar

Study thematically related literary, historical, cultural and contemporary texts. Develop, express and critique textual interpretation and analysis in a research paper. In French and English.

3

Prerequisites

FR 202 with a minimum grade of D-

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: ASIA 475 and FR 475 and GER 475

GEOG 100 World Geography

Introduction to the complex relationships that link humans with their physical, cultural and spatial environments. Students will investigate these diverse relationships through a variety of worldwide examples.
3

Course Attribute

LC5b-Geography and GT Geography

GEOG 110 Geography of the United States and Canada

An analysis of the cultural and environmental patterns of North America, with emphasis on the geographic processes that shape them.
3

Course Attribute

LC5b-Geography and GT Geography

GEOG 111 Introduction to Field Techniques

Course encourages students to demonstrate an understanding of the value, meaning and benefits of experiential learning and to explore a variety of applied field techniques.

1-3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

GEOG 185 Introduction to Drones

This course will expose students to the fundamental concepts and geo-spatial utilization of drones (sUAVs). Students will learn the technologies, concepts, and applications of drones. 

3

GEOG 195 Introduction to Geographic Methods

Introduction to geography field and other research methods: asking geographic questions, identifying data needs, planning field work or other geographic research, working in teams, making observations and recording data.
3

GEOG 200 Human Geography

Study the role of location and locational questions in human behavior including how locational factors influence behavior and resulting social and cultural modifications.
3

Course Attribute

LC5b-Geography and GT Geography

GEOG 210 Introduction to GIS and GPS

This course will expose students to the fundamental concepts and application techniques used in Geographic Information Science (GIS) and Global Positioning Systems (GPS).
3

Course Attribute

Liberal Arts Core Elective

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

GEOG 218 Emerging Asia

Critically analyze the rapid (re)emergence of Asia as a center of the global economy and the enormous geographic diversity across its sub-regions (South, Southeast, and East Asia).
3

Course Attribute

LC7-International Studies

GEOG 220 Climate and Vegetation

Introduces basic patterns and processes operating in the atmosphere and biosphere, emphasizing the distribution of major features found on Earth and the interactions between humans and the natural environment.
3

GEOG 224 Exploring Colorado

A multidisciplinary approach-geographic, historical, economic, and civic- is used to investigate and analyze issues pertinent to the State of Colorado.
3

GEOG 230 Landforms, Water & Hazards

Introduces the basic patterns and processes operating in the lithosphere and hydrosphere, emphasizing the distribution and forms of features found on Earth, and the natural hazards associated with them.
3

GEOG 249 Controversies in Agriculture, Food, and Farming

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach toward understanding modern and traditional agriculture, and the ways in which these agricultural forms both clash and coalesce.
3

GEOG 250 The Making of the American Landscape

Introduction to the historical geography of North America emphasizing the historical roots of contemporary American landscapes and employing the theories, concepts and methods of social science used by geographers.
3

Course Attribute

LC5b-Geography and GT Geography

GEOG 270 Professional Development

Explore career options for geography and environmental studies majors and practice professional development skills.

3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GEOG 270 and ENST 270

GEOG 296 Study Abroad Experience

An experiential approach to learning about cultures, landscapes, language and natural resources of another country. Students engage with the natural environment and local communities through written assignments and intensive fieldwork. S/U graded.
3

Course Attribute

LC7-International Studies

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 2 times

GEOG 300 Advanced Human Geography: Topics

Examine the evidence and imprint of cultural values on geographic landscapes; utilize techniques of spatial diffusion, cultural ecology and integration and landscape analysis to identify and investigate culture regions.
3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

GEOG 302 Cartography

Study the fundamentals, theory and practice of mapmaking and graphic representation. Students make use of advanced geographic information systems (GIS) and illustration software packages.
3

Special Notes

GEOG 210 or previous GIS experience recommended.

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

GEOG 307 Geographic Information Science

Examines the nature and accuracy of spatially referenced data, as well as methods of data capture, storage, retrieval, modeling and output using GIS software.
3

Special Notes

GEOG 210 or previous GIS experience is recommended, but not required.

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

GEOG 310 Urban and Regional Planning

Examine current planning practice in the United States and its larger economic, social, political and geographic context. Topics include land use regulation, urban design, transportation systems and growth Management.
3

GEOG 312 Economic Geography of the Industrialized World

Systematic study of relationships between geography and economics, focusing on spatial dynamics of technical change, divisions of labor, business organization, resource use, and international trade.
3

GEOG 315 Nature and Society

Analyze problems in nature-society relationships by exploring geographic theory surrounding environmental politics, surveying local and global actors in these conflicts, and addressing varied contemporary issues in resource management.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GEOG 315 and ENST 315

GEOG 320 Population Geography

Analysis of world population distribution and change utilizing geographic themes and demographic measures, with particular attention to migration, urbanization, environmental impact, and national planning.
3

GEOG 324 Crime Mapping

Provides the student with hands on experience in the use of Geographic Information System (GIS technology to analyze organizational operations, crime statistics, and crime patterns).
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GEOG 324 and CRJ 324

GEOG 325 Advanced Physical Geography: Topics

Study the complexities of the physical world and investigate the interactions between human activities and the physical environment.
3

Prerequisites

(GEOG 220 or GEOG 230 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

GEOG 326 Africa

Identify and analyze relationships between the physical and cultural patterns, including land use, resource development, social, political and economic problems.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GEOG 326 and ENST326

GEOG 327 Fundamentals of Geospatial Programming

This course provides fundamental skills for geospatial programming. Topics include learning Python scripting syntax and using scripts to access and automate geographic processing tasks.
3

Prerequisites

GEOG 210 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

GEOG 330 Cultural Geography

Examine the evidence and imprint of cultural values on geographic landscapes; utilize techniques of spatial diffusion, cultural ecology and integration and landscape analysis to identify and investigate culture regions.
3

GEOG 333 South America

Explores land, people, and culture in the major sub-regions of South America. Emphasis on contemporary population, economic, political and environmental issues.
3

GEOG 335 Geography of Middle America

Examines patterns of population, politics, economy and life-styles as they relate to the diverse physical and multicultural environments of Middle America. Analyze the strategic location of this region.
3

GEOG 340 Europe

Study the relationships between the physical and cultural environments, including land use, resources, economics and political problems.
3

GEOG 345 Environmental Geography: Earth at Risk

Examine selected environmental issues, including climate change, environmental degradation, and resource depletion, focusing on the physical processes underlying these problems and how human activities contribute to environmental problems.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GEOG 345 and ENST 345

GEOG 360 Nations, States, and Territory

Systematic study of relationships between geography and politics; topics include the formation of the modern state, the international system, territorial expansion, global markets, warfare, and political interactions at various scales.
3

GEOG 370 The City

Systematic study of urban processes, from the ancient to the modern world, with an emphasis on the origins, development, and future of cities in the United States.
3

GEOG 375 Quantitative Techniques in Geography

Examine elementary statistical techniques useful to the analysis of geographical data. Some background in mathematics useful.
3

GEOG 380 Sustainable Geographies

Examine the sustainability of contemporary living patterns. Explore alternative approaches to meeting transportation, domestic power and heating, food production and waste disposal needs on the personal and community levels.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GEOG 380 and ENST 380

GEOG 385 Natural Parks & Protected Areas Seminar

Explores the role of protected areas in sustaining society, and examines natural parks as working ecosystems, biodiversity and resource banks, recreational spaces, and symbols of cultural and national heritage. Culminates in a capstone project.
3

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

GEOG 390 Geographic Inquiry: Applying Spatial Thinking

Investigation and analysis of geographic issues with examples of successful approaches for teaching geography. Students create materials appropriate for teaching geography concepts and spatial thinking skills in the K-12 curriculum.
3

Prerequisites

GEOG 200 with a minimum grade of D-

GEOG 391 Western Colorado Rivers

Field course: Analyzes the geography of rivers in Western Colorado. Fieldwork and conceptual skills address environmental issues, using specialized equipment, maps, data storage devices, and field sampling methods.
3

Course Fee

Participation Fee Required and Supervision Fee Required

GEOG 392 Field Course in Geography

Study and apply the techniques used in solving geographic problems in the field and effectively present the results of such studies.
1- 6

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 1 times

GEOG 395 Advanced Regional Geography: Topics

Study special topics in regional geography: contemporary geographic issues affecting environmental, economic, political, cultural, or social phenomena in emerging or borderland regions.
3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

GEOG 412 Web Mapping

Study thematic map communication via the internet and wireless technologies. Develop interactive maps that can be served over the internet. Build mobile mapping applications.
3

Prerequisites

(GEOG 210 or GEOG 302 or GEOG 307 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

GEOG 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 3

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

GEOG 440 Biogeography

Identify meaningful patterns in the distributions of plants and animals and explain how/why those patterns developed. Includes an examination of the role humans have played in shaping those patterns.
3

Prerequisites

(GEOG 220 or GEOG 230 or ENST 100 or BIO 111 with a minimum grade of D-)

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GEOG 440 and ENST 440

GEOG 444 Global Climate Change

An examination of what causes climate to change across different time scales; how climate has changed in the past; how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate; and the consequences of climate change for our planet. One field trip required.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GEOG 444 and ENST 444

GEOG 445 Landscape Ecology

Examines the relationships between spatial patterns in landscape structure (physical, biological and cultural) and ecological processes.
3

Prerequisites

(GEOG 200 or GEOG 230 or ENST 100 with a minimum grade of D-)

GEOG 449 Remote Sensing of the Environment

Students will learn the conceptual foundations and technical skills to apply remote sensing in environmental and cultural applications. Topics will include land use/land cover classification, change detection, and vegetation modeling.
3

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

GEOG 466 Grant and Proposal Writing

Explores the fundamentals of grant writing and culminates in the creation of a proposal for submission to a federal agency or nonprofit.

3

GEOG 470 Urban GIS

Students will gain in-depth knowledge on various urban topics, and evaluate critically economic, social, environmental and health problems in urban areas using GIS.

3

Prerequisites

GEOG 210 with a minimum grade of D-

GEOG 485 Advanced Geographic Techniques: Topics

Advanced study of geographic techniques. Topics will relate to applications in GIS, remote sensing, quantitative analysis, land use analysis, or the mapping sciences.
1- 3

Prerequisites

GEOG 210 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

GEOG 490 Capstone Proposal

Introduces the research process through identification and framing of a research proposal following accepted and standard protocols. Topics include hypothesis formulation and testing, designing a research project, and career preparedness.

2

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GEOG 490 and ENST 490

Program Restrictions

Include Geography:Global-Area Stds-BA and Geography:GIS-BA

Class Restriction

Include Senior

GEOG 491 Senior Capstone

Research selected environmental and geographic topics based on ENST/GEOG 490 Proposal. Course focuses on the assessment of students' environmental and geographic knowledge base, research and analysis skills.

2

Prerequisites

GEOG 490 with a minimum grade of D-

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GEOG 491 and ENST 491

Program Restrictions

Include Geography:Global-Area Stds-BA and Geography:GIS-BA

Class Restriction

Include Senior

GEOG 492 Internship

Advanced undergraduate majors and minors use geographic training while working in local, state or federal agencies. Participants must meet university internship requirements. S/U Graded.
1- 6

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

GEOG 495 Senior Seminar

Research selected geographic topics based on the student's major emphasis. Course focuses on the assessment of students' geographic knowledge base, research and analysis skills.
3

Prerequisites

(GEOG 375 with a minimum grade of D-) and (GEOG 302 or GEOG 307 with a minimum grade of D-)

Major/Minor Restriction

Include Geography Major(s)

Class Restriction

Include Senior

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

GEOL 100 General Geology

(3 lecture, 2 laboratory) Survey for nonscience majors. Origins and classification of minerals and rocks, landscape development and earth's structure and history. Field trips required.
4

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GEOL 100 and GEOL 201

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and LCLB-Science Lab Course and GT Physical & Life Science

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

GEOL 110 Our Geological Environment

Investigation of the interaction between people and geologic environments. Focus on earth materials, geologic time, landscapes, mineral and energy resources, and geologic hazards (earthquakes, volcanoes, floods and landslides).
3

Major/Minor Restriction

Exclude Earth Sciences Major(s)

Course Attribute

LC6-Physical & Life Sciences and GT Physical & Life Sciences

GEOL 201 Physical Geology

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) For Geology and other science majors. Introduction to earth materials, landform development, geologic structures and tectonics. Field trips required.
4

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GEOL 201 and GEOL 100

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

GEOL 202 Historical Geology

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Geologic history of the earth and its past life and principles and techniques employed to interpret this history from rocks and fossils. Field trips to investigate local geologic history required.
4

Prerequisites

(GEOL 100 or GEOL 201 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

GEOL 320 Mineralogy

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Introduction to crystallography, crystal chemistry, descriptive and determinative mineralogy, study of mineral occurrences and associations. Examine crystallography and identify minerals by physical and x-ray techniques in laboratory. Field trip(s) required. .
4

Prerequisites

GEOL 201 with a minimum grade of D-

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GEOL 320 and ESCI 320

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

GEOL 340 Paleontology

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Study of fossils including taxonomy, systematics, taphonomy, functional morphology, paleoecology, biostratigraphy, extinction, evolutionary trends and major events in the history of life. Labs review major fossil groups. Field trips required.
4

Prerequisites

GEOL 202 with a minimum grade of D-

GEOL 390 Colorado Geology

Colorado rocks, minerals, fossils, landforms, oil, coal, oil shale, geologic history and geologic hazards explored in informal atmosphere. Includes multi-day field trip to investigate geological features in natural settings.
3

Prerequisites

(GEOL 100 or GEOL 201 with a minimum grade of D-)

GEOL 410 Groundwater Geology

(2 lecture, 3 laboratory) Groundwater geologic settings. Hydrology of groundwater basins. Well hydraulics. Principles of flow in saturated and unsaturated materials. Modeling of hydrogeologic systems. Applications to groundwater contamination and management problems.
3

Prerequisites

(GEOL 100 or GEOL 201 with a minimum grade of D-) and (Concurrent Prerequisite MATH 131 with a minimum grade of D-)

GEOL 415 Ore Geology

Overview of what ore is and how it is formed, techniques of finding and extracting ore, plus environmental impacts of extracting ore. Case studies of well-known mines.
3

Prerequisites

(GEOL 202 and GEOL 320 with a minimum grade of D-)

GEOL 421 Ig and Met Petrology

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Description and classification of igneous and metamorphic rocks in hand sample and in thin section. Includes a study of the genesis of igneous and metamorphic rocks via phase diagrams and chemical reactions.
4

Prerequisites

GEOL 320 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

GEOL 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 4

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

GEOL 445 Vertebrate Paleontology

A survey of the evolution of vertebrates through geologic time, emphasizing major events in the history of vertebrates. Includes field trips and methods of fossil collection, preparation, and curation.
3

Prerequisites

GEOL 202 with a minimum grade of D-

GEOL 450 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Sedimentary processes; depositional environments; classification and structures of sedimentary rocks; field and laboratory methods of analyzing and interpreting outcrops and samples. Regional stratigraphy of northeastern Colorado investigated. Field trips required.
4

Prerequisites

GEOL 202 with a minimum grade of D-

GEOL 460 Geomorphology

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Origin and evolution of landforms emphasizing processes of their formation, including tectonic, glacial, fluvial and hillslope processes. Two field trips are required.
4

Prerequisites

(GEOL 100 or GEOL 201 with a minimum grade of D-) and (Concurrent Prerequisite MATH 131 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Fee

Participation Fee Required

GEOL 464 Glacial and Quaternary Geology

A survey of geologic phenomena that characterized the Quaternary Period, with emphasis on the behavior of glaciers, glacial landforms and sediment and climatic implications. Two Saturday field trips required.
3

Prerequisites

(GEOL 100 or GEOL 201 with a minimum grade of D-)

GEOL 467 Volcanic Geology

(2 lecture, 3 laboratory) A study of volcanoes, and volcanic processes and products. Emphasis on the origin, classification and interpretation of volcanic rocks and ejecta, and volcanic structures and landforms.
3

Prerequisites

GEOL 202 with a minimum grade of D-

GEOL 470 Structural Geology

(3 lecture, 3 laboratory) Mechanics of rock deformation and geologic structures of the earth's crust – their description and classification, theories and facts regarding their origins and methods of investigating them. Field trips required.
4

Prerequisites

GEOL 202 with a minimum grade of D-

GEOL 481 Geologic Field Techniques

(1 lecture, 4 laboratory) Collection of field geological data, construction of geologic maps, cross-sections, and reports. Includes use of Brunton compass, topographic maps, aerial photographs, and geographic information systems.
3

Prerequisites

(GEOL 450 and GEOL 470 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Fee

Course Fee Required

GEOL 483 Soils

(2 lecture, 3 laboratory) Explore, examine and interpret classification, genesis and processes that drive soil formation. Use soil data from various ecosystems to assess soil health and land management issues. One weekend field trip required.
3

Prerequisites

(CHEM 111 with a minimum grade of D-) and (ESCI 320 or GEOL 320 with a minimum grade of D-)

Course Fee

Participation Fee Required

GEOL 485 Tectonics

Overview of the processes driving and resulting from plate tectonics. Detailed study of some of the earth's past and present mountain belts.
3

Prerequisites

GEOL 470 with a minimum grade of D-

GEOL 486 Petroleum and Energy

Petroleum and energy geology includes integrated exploration and development methods and understanding technological advancements that have led to the dynamic energy industry. Case studies and applied problems are emphasized.
3

Prerequisites

(GEOL 201 and CHEM 111 with a minimum grade of D-)

GER 101 Elementary German I

For students with no previous German. Develop four language skills, especially speaking. Stresses practical communication, comprehension, pronunciation, fluency and cultural awareness.
5

Course Attribute

LC7-International Studies

GER 102 Elementary German II

Continuation of GER 101 or equivalent. Develop four language skills, especially speaking. Stresses practical communication, comprehension, pronunciation, fluency and cultural awareness.
5

Prerequisites

GER 101 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

LC7-International Studies

GER 116 Contemporary Germany

Become familiar with the culture and society of Germany with special emphasis on contemporary German issues. Conducted in English.
3

GER 117 German Hospitality

Study German traditions of hospitality in social and commercial contexts, including the cultural significance of beer. Apply awareness of German hospitality to travel and entrepreneurship by Americans. Conducted in English.
3

GER 201 Intermediate German I

Prerequisites: Two years of high school German or demonstrated language proficiency; AND a placement evaluation by the German program coordinator. Review language structures and develop reading and writing skills. Gain vocabulary through conversational practice on topics of cultural interest.
3

Course Attribute

LC3d-World Languages and LC7-International Studies and GT Foreign Languages

GER 202 Intermediate German II

Review language structures and develop reading and writing skills. Gain vocabulary through conversational practice on topics of cultural and literary interest.
3

Prerequisites

GER 201 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

LC3d-World Languages and LC7-International Studies and GT Foreign Languages

GER 216 German Literature in Translation

Study German-language literary works translated into English. Become familiar with different genres and major writers of German literary traditions and situate literature within its social and historical contexts. Conducted in English.
3

GER 301 Germany and the Germans I

Practice advanced language skills and acquire flexibility in written and spoken expression using a wide variety of authentic materials.
3

Prerequisites

GER 202 with a minimum grade of D-

GER 302 Germany and the Germans II

Continue to study complex elements of German syntax and structure. Use authentic materials to acquire idiomatic expressions and versatility in speaking and writing.
3

Prerequisites

GER 202 with a minimum grade of D-

GER 311 German Civilization and Literature Survey I

Study of German civilization from prehistoric times up to the 19th century, including the historical, geographical, economic, political, artistic and literary development of Germany. Conducted in German.
3

Prerequisites

GER 202 with a minimum grade of D-

GER 312 German Civilization and Literature Survey II

Study of German civilization from the Revolution of 1848 to the present, including the historical, economic, political, social, artistic and literary development of Germany. Conducted in German.
3

Prerequisites

GER 202 with a minimum grade of D-

GER 407 German Phonetics and Oral Proficiency

Intermediate oral proficiency in German required. Designed to develop oral proficiency through intensive phonetic training, and by exposing students to advanced and superior linguistic functions. This course prepares students for the Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI).
3

Prerequisites

GER 202 with a minimum grade of D-

Class Restriction

Include Junior and Senior

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 1 times

GER 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 4

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

GER 440 Advanced Linguistic Studies

An in-depth study of the German language in historical and contemporary contexts. Topics may include German morphology, German phonology, history of the German language.

3

Prerequisites

GER 300-399 with a minimum grade of D-

GER 450 Advanced German Literature and Culture

In-depth study of one literary or cultural topic related to Germany, Austria and/or Switzerland. Conducted in German.

3

Prerequisites

GER 202 with a minimum grade of D-

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles with no limits on the number of times it can be repeated

GER 475 Research Seminar

Study thematically related literary, historical, cultural and contemporary texts. Develop, express and critique textual interpretation and analysis in a research paper. In German and English.

3

Prerequisites

GER 202 with a minimum grade of D-

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit only allowed for one of these courses: ASIA 475 and FR 475 and GER 475

GNDR 101 Gender and Society

Why does gender matter? This interdisciplinary course interrogates the construction of gender in relationship to other social categories (such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, etc.) as they inform everyday life.
3

Course Attribute

LC5c-Hum Behav & Social Sys and LC8-US Multicultural Studies and GT Human Behavior & Soc Sys

GNDR 240 Gender, Race, Class, and Sexuality

This course examines multiple and shifting categories of gender, race, class, and sexuality in feminist perspective, investigating how they contribute to our understandings of systems of privilege and inequality.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GNDR 240 and SOC 240

Course Attribute

LC5c-Hum Behav & Social Sys and SS3-GT Human Behavior & Social Sys and LC8-US Multicultural Studies

GNDR 285 Gender in the Contemporary Global Order

This course uses multiple theoretical perspectives to provide a cultural analysis of modernization, economic development, and globalization and their gendered effects on people in developed and underdeveloped countries.
3

Course Attribute

LC5c-Hum Behav & Social Sys and SS3-GT Human Behavior & Social Sys and LC7-International Studies

GNDR 300 History of Feminism

This course provides an in-depth study of the history of American feminist political movements and intellectual traditions from the beginnings of the woman suffrage movement through contemporary feminist activism.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GNDR 300 and HIST 300

GNDR 316 Global Conflict and Gender

This course uses multiple theoretical perspectives to provide a cultural analysis of conflict and war and their gendered effects on women, men, and other genders across the globe.

3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GNDR 316 and ANT 316

GNDR 320 Gender in Popular Culture

Students will engage in an analysis of how gender and sexuality operate in the media and pop culture and examine how these representations affect identity formation.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GNDR 320 and SOC 323

GNDR 350 Feminist Theories

This course offers a survey of competing philosophical, political, and epistemological feminist frameworks for understanding gender inequality, examining how feminist theories both build on and critique Western philosophical traditions.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GNDR 350 and PHIL 360

GNDR 372 Bodies and Power

We examine the body as object and subject of shifting race, gender, class, and sexual meanings and as the product of complex social processes, including culture, medicalization, objectification, commodification, and globalization.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GNDR 372 and SOC 372

GNDR 380 Queer Studies

This course introduces students to the field of queer studies. It examines the histories, identities, and theories emerging from gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered communities and political movements.
3

GNDR 395 Topics in Gender Studies

This course provides opportunities to explore gender as a category of analysis in relationship to a variety of disciplinary approaches and selected topics.
3

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 1 times

GNDR 414 Masculinities

A sociological analysis not just of men, but of masculinities. We will address debates about meanings of masculinity, historical variations, and how these definitions involve both male and female bodies.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: GNDR 414 and SOC 414

GNDR 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 3

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

GNDR 492 Internship

Supervised field practice on research related to gender issues. Paper analyzing experience required. Maximum of 3 semester credits count toward requirements for the Gender Studies Minor. S/U graded.

3-6

Special Notes

Prerequisite: 3 hours of GNDR credit or instructor permission.

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

GOAL 101 Transition to College Life and Career

Students will explore the rigors of college life and understand aspects of attending college and how this can benefit a student’s transition to career. This course includes the following topics: daily living skills, self-determination & interpersonal skills, and employment skills. Required Program fee.

4

Program Restrictions

Include UNC GOAL Program

GOAL 102 Career Exploration

Students will understand how to explore employment possibilities in relation to their interests and strengths.

4

Prerequisites

GOAL 101 with a minimum grade of D-

Special Notes

Field hours and program fee required. Note: As students in the GOAL Program, students will pursue on-campus work experience.

Program Restrictions

Include UNC GOAL Program

GOAL 201 Social Thinking for Careers and Community Living

Students will demonstrate confidence and competency in the effective use of  social thinking strategies and skills on campus, in the workplace, and in the community to increase opportunities for career advancement, authentic friendships, and independence.

4

Prerequisites

GOAL 102 with a minimum grade of D-

Special Notes

Field hours and Program fee required. Note: As students in the GOAL Program, students will pursue on-campus work experience.

Program Restrictions

Include UNC GOAL Program

GOAL 202 Literacy for Career and Community Living

Students will understand how literacy and effective literacy strategies impact daily living, communication, and employability.
4

Prerequisites

GOAL 201 with a minimum grade of D-

Special Notes

Field hours and Program fee required. Note: As students in the GOAL Program, students will pursue on-campus work experience.

Program Restrictions

Include UNC GOAL Program

GOAL 301 Career Choices & Finances

Students will understand how to choose a career based on their future financial lifestyle.

4

Prerequisites

GOAL 202 with a minimum grade of D-

Special Notes

Field hours and program fee required. Note: As students in the GOAL Program, students will participate in an off-campus internship.

Program Restrictions

Include UNC GOAL Program

GOAL 302 Career & Community Engagement

Students will understand how to engage in their community and careers through exploration of community resources, events, and volunteer work.

4

Prerequisites

GOAL 301 with a minimum grade of D-

Special Notes

Field hours and Program fee required. Note: As students in the GOAL Program, students will pursue an off-campus internship.

Program Restrictions

Include UNC GOAL Program

GOAL 401 Workplace Skills, Interactions & Communication

Students will understand how to develop workplace skills, interact successfully on the job, and communicate effectively in the workplace.

4

Prerequisites

GOAL 302 with a minimum grade of D-

Special Notes

Requires field hours and program fee. Note: As students in the GOAL Program, students will pursue an off-campus internship.

Program Restrictions

Include UNC GOAL Program

GOAL 402 Preparing for Career and Independence After College

Students will understand what it means to work and live independently after graduation from college.

4

Prerequisites

GOAL 401 with a minimum grade of D-

Special Notes

Field hours and Program fee required. Note: As students in the GOAL Program, students will participate in an off-campus internship.

Program Restrictions

Include UNC GOAL Program

HESA 301 Foundations and Praxis of Higher Education and Student Affairs

A survey course on the higher education and student affairs profession. Examines HESAL foundations: professional values, beliefs, and ethical standards; social justice; and current issues. Explores HESAL praxis: academic affairs and student affairs functional areas, professional associations, and graduate school preparation.
3

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

HESA 311 Leadership for Higher Education and Student Affairs Groups and Organizations

Explore group dynamics and leadership development as it relates to student groups and organizations on a college campus. Focus on organizational behaviors, effective communication, campus partnerships, and ethical dilemmas within group settings. This course is recommended for students involved in student groups and organizations.
3

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

HESA 355 Leadership for Social Change in Higher Education and Student Affairs

Explore social issues that influence college student participation and success. Engage in the type of leadership practice that inspires social change on campus and/or surrounding community. Establish connections between power, privilege, and oppression to formulate ideas and strategies to impact positive societal change in higher education and student affairs.
3

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

HESA 422 Directed Studies

Individualized investigation under the direct supervision of a faculty member. (Minimum of 37.5 clock hours required per credit hour.)
1- 3

Special Notes

Maximum concurrent enrollment is two times.

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

Course is repeatable with no limitations

HESA 496 Special Topics in Higher Education and Student Affairs Leadership

Study of special topics in higher education and student affairs leadership for undergraduate students. Topics vary.
1- 3

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course may be repeated 1 times

HISP 102 Hispanic Cultures in the United States

A study of the development of cultural patterns among the three largest Hispanic communities in this country: Chicanos, Puerto Ricans and Cuban- Americans — their differences and commonalities. Taught in English.
3

Course Attribute

LC5c-Hum Behav & Social Sys and LC8-US Multicultural Studies and GT Human Behavior & Soc Sys

HISP 111 Introduction to Hispanic Literature

An introduction to prominent contemporary writers. Includes theatre, novel, short story and poetry in translation. Works of Lorca, Matute, Unamuno, Borges, Rulfo, Garcia Marquez, Anaya. Taught in English.
3

Course Attribute

LC3b-Literature & Humanities and LC7-International Studies and GT Literature

HISP 395 History and Philosophy of Bilingual Education

Introduction to history, philosophy, and legal issues in education of English language learners in the US. Analyzes current issues concerning bilingual students, bilingual education, school reform and community partnerships.
3

Repeatable Status

Course may be repeated 1 times

HIST 100 Survey of American History from Its Beginnings to 1877

Survey of American history through Reconstruction to examine efforts to found New World communities, gain an American identity, secure independence and to define and secure the union under a federal government.
3

Course Attribute

LC4-History and GT History

HIST 101 Survey of American History from 1877 to the Present

Survey of American history from reconstruction to the present to examine geographical expansion, the rise of industrial and military power, five American wars, reform cycles and the shaping of modern America.
3

Course Attribute

LC4-History and GT History

HIST 110 African Civilization

An introduction to the society, economy, culture and politics of traditional Africa from the Empire of Ghana to the European conquest in the nineteenth century.
3

Course Attribute

LC4-History and GT History

HIST 112 Asian Civilization I: From Prehistory to 1500

Introduction to the historical development of pre-modern cultures in East, South, Southeast and Central Asia.
3

Course Attribute

LC4-History and GT History

HIST 113 Asian Civilizations II: From 1500 to the Present

Examination of the modern transformation of East, South and Southeast Asian societies.
3

Course Attribute

LC4-History and GT History

HIST 114 World History to 1500

An introduction to the main global eras, their characteristics, and selected examples from the origins of our species to around 1491, with a focus on the period after 1000 BCE. Topics include empire, religion, gender relations, and the environment.
3

Course Attribute

LC4-History and GT History

HIST 115 World History since 1500

Survey of the world's major civilizations, their unique achievements, and their interactions with and relation to other societies. Examines political, economic, and social change in the period encompassing the sixteenth through the twenty-first centuries.
3

Course Attribute

LC4-History and GT History

HIST 118 History of Mexico

Mexican history from pre-Columbian times to the present emphasizing 19th and 20th centuries. Covers socioeconomic, political and cultural change.
3

Course Attribute

LC4-History and GT History

HIST 120 Western Civilization from Ancient Greece to 1689

A survey of Western civilization from ancient Greece to the Glorious Revolution
3

Course Attribute

LC4-History and GT History

HIST 121 Western Civilization from 1689 to the Present

A survey of western Civilization from the Glorious Revolution to the present.
3

Course Attribute

LC4-History and GT History

HIST 217 Europe and Islam: Myth and Reality

With reference to literature, art, film and memoir, this course examines the changing ways in which European society (Christendom) has viewed its Middle Eastern counterpart (Islam) over the centuries and vice versa.
3

HIST 224 History of Colorado

A survey of Colorado history from prehistoric times to the post-World War II era.
3

HIST 225 Latina/Latino History

Seeks to examine the historical and historiographical trend lines of the Latino experience. Among the issues to be explored: identity, heritage, language, gender roles.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: HIST 225 and MAS 225

HIST 230 Class and Culture in America

Explores class distinctions and the ways they changed over time, filtered through the lenses of gender, race, age, labor, consumption, popular culture, the family, and the American Dream.
3

HIST 240 Critical Issues in Modern America

A tracing of modern American history. Topics may include such items as foreign policy, presidential politics, civil rights, the growth of the welfare state and the changing American character.
3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

HIST 264 Magic in Europe from Antiquity to the Enlightenment

A survey of magical thought and practice in Europe from Ancient Greece to the Enlightenment.

3

HIST 280 Sophomore Seminar

An introduction to history, historiography, and historical methods.
3

Major/Minor Restriction

Include History Major(s)/Minor(s)

Class Restriction

Include Sophomore and Junior and Senior

HIST 283 Russian Cultural History

Development of Russian culture and society from the beginning to the present, with an emphasis on the 19th and 20th century, and contemporary contexts.
3

HIST 290 American Immigration

An examination of immigration to the United States, emphasizing 19th and 20th centuries. Includes Irish, English, German, Italian, Scandinavian, Jewish, Asian and Latin American immigrants as well as nativist and immigration legislation.
3

HIST 300 History of Feminism

This course provides an in-depth study of the history of American feminist political movements and intellectual traditions from the beginnings of the woman suffrage movement through contemporary feminist activism.
3

Mutually Exclusive Course

Credit allowed for only one of these courses: HIST 300 and GNDR 300

HIST 301 Colonial Africa

Examines Colonial African history emphasizing the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics covered include concepts of imperialism, varieties of colonial administration, urbanization, gender, PanAfricanism, and resistance.
3

HIST 304 Sex and Gender in East Asia

This course explores the role of men, women, and gender politics in East Asian history from the pre-modern era to the present. Topics discussed include Confucian gender ideology and patriarchy, female chastity and virtue, the politics of love and sexuality, as well as body and fashion.
3

HIST 305 Screening for HIST 306

Required once per week film screening time to complement HIST 306.
0

Corequisites

HIST 306

HIST 306 Modern China through Film

(3 lecture, 1 film screening) This course introduces some issues in modern Chinese history and examines how that history is treated in film. It places film in historical context, considering both the aesthetic form and the socio-political content of the films.
3

Corequisites

HIST 305

HIST 307 History to China to 1500

A study of the development of Chinese civilization from antiquity to 1500, stressing indigenous social, political and cultural change
3

HIST 309 History of Southeast Asia

An analysis of the historical experience of Vietnamese, Filipinos, Malays, Thais, Indonesians, and others from earliest times to the present.
3

HIST 310 History of China Since 1500

An analysis of the Chinese experience from 1500 to the present. Emphasizes the internal changes in China's political, social, economic, and cultural institutions.
3

HIST 311 History of Japan

A historical analysis of the Japanese experience from earliest times to the present. Emphasizes internal changes in political, social, economic, and cultural institutions.
3

HIST 312 History of Brazil

Study of Brazilian history from 1500 to the present, stressing the multiethnic dynamics of colonial society, the political transformations of independence, and the contemporary legacies of race, slavery, abolition, and gender.
3

HIST 314 History of Latin America to 1855

A survey of Spanish America and Brazil from pre-Columbian civilizations to 1855. Covers conquest, church, Indian labor, administration, independence and beginning of nations.
3

HIST 315 History of Latin America: 1855 to the Present

A thematic study of personalism, nationalism, militarism, foreign influences and socioeconomic classes with particular reference to Nicaragua, Cuba, Chile, Argentina and Brazil.
3

HIST 316 History of Caribbean and Central America

The history of the Caribbean from pre Columbian times to the present, focusing on the legacies of slavery, abolition, race, and imperialism in Haiti, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica and Nicaragua.
3

HIST 318 Modern Africa

A study of the social, political, economic and cultural transformation of 20th century Africa.
3

HIST 319 Revolutionary South Africa

A study of the enormous changes South Africa has experienced since 1654, investigating the development of ethnic groups, race relations, economic development, the imposition of apartheid, the successful struggle to establish majority rule, and the creation of a new multicultural nation.
3

HIST 320 Early America to 1763

Examines history of early North America from European, African, and Native American perspectives, including cultural conflict among these groups; European imperial aims; political and economic developments; and experiences of ordinary people.

3

HIST 321 Revolutionary America, 1763-1815

A study of the background of the American Revolution, the Revolution itself, the Confederation, the framing of the Federal Constitution and the social, economic, political and religious patterns of the Early Republic.
3

HIST 322 Religion in American History

Investigates the critical and varied role of religion in American history from the arrival of Europeans in the sixteenth century through the present.
3

HIST 323 Marriage and Family in the United States

Examines family formations, the role of children and the changing institutions of marriage throughout U.S. history, from Native Americans pre-contact to the present day.
3

HIST 326 Sex and Sexuality in the United States

Explores the sexual habits, practices, and beliefs of Americans from the 1600s to the present. Will examine both heterosexuality, same-sex sexuality, and the formation of sexual subjectivity itself.
3

HIST 327 The Early American West

Divides the American frontier into two parts: the Spanish and English language frontiers. Included is analysis of themes of environment, culture and perception of the frontier before 1846.
3

HIST 328 The United States West Since 1846

Analyzes the themes of modernization, cultural change, environment and perception that arose from the American presence in the West after the war with Mexico, including the 20th century.
3

HIST 329 Indigenous North America

Covers the American Indian experience from prehistory to the present, emphasizing themes of environment, diversity and perception of native peoples by outside observers.
3

HIST 330 Antebellum America, 1815-1860

Explores the social and regional conflicts created by the rise of industrial capitalism, the elaboration of plantation slavery, and the development of democratic politics before the Civil War.

3

HIST 331 Civil War and Reconstruction

Major topics studied include political upheavals in the 1850s, the growth of southern nationalism, attempts at compromising constitutional differences, the Civil War and problems in reconstructing the Union.
3

HIST 334 The United States and the World

A survey of American foreign policy from the birth of the new nation to the present, examining problems of war and peace as well as American expansionism, imperialism and internationalism from 1776 to the present.
3

HIST 338 Advanced Overview of American History

Advanced survey of American history from its beginning. Students will learn concepts of historical thinking and how to analyze the processes and resources of historical inquiry as these affect America.
3

HIST 342 American Constitutional History

An analysis of the origins and early history of the constitution, including its drafting, ratification and subsequent shaping. A survey of the development of constitutional interpretation by examining major cases in their historical context.
3

HIST 347 United States Women's History to 1877

A survey of women in the United States to 1877. Examines gender ideologies, population movements, patterns of work, reform activities, and early women's rights from Colonization through Reconstruction.
3

HIST 348 United States Women's History Since 1877

A survey of women in the United States to 1877. Examines gender ideologies, population movements, patterns of work, reform activities, and early women's rights from Colonization through Reconstruction.
3

HIST 349 American Queer History

Explores the history of same-sex and gender variant people from colonial America to the present, focusing especially upon the development of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and trans-gender identities from the late nineteenth century onward.
3

HIST 351 The United States and World War II

A survey of World War II from the rise of the totalitarian states to the dropping of the atomic bombs; emphasis on the military and social aspects of the war.
3

HIST 353 The Rise of the American Century: The United States from 1898-1945

Focusing on the United states from the turn of the twentieth century through World War II, this course highlights the rise of the United States as a military and economic power, as well as the dynamic relationship between everyday Americans and an ever expanding federal government.
3

HIST 354 The United States and the Vietnam Wars

Through a variety of readings, the course will concentrate on the political, social and cultural importance of Vietnam for American history from 1945 to 1975 and beyond.

3

HIST 355 American as a World Power: United States History from 1945 to the Present

A study of the political, social, cultural, and economic developments in post-WWII America. There will be a particular focus on the challenges Americans faced, at home and abroad during a time of U.S. global supremacy.
3

HIST 356 The 1970s: America's Decade of Change

An in depth look at the major political, social, and economic developments of the United States during the 1970s examined primarily through the lens of popular culture.
3

HIST 357 The United States and the Middle East

An examination of the history of relations between the United States and the nations and peoples of the "greater Middle East." Provides a chronological and analytical overview of the major themes and events in US relations with the Middle East with a special focus on the 20th and 21st centuries. Counts as a US History concentration elective.
3

HIST 361 History of Classical Greece and Rome

A survey of Greek and Roman civilization from the origins of Greece to the decline of Rome. Emphasis will be placed on their cultural and intellectual heritage.
3

HIST 363 Medieval History

An examination of Western Europe from Late Antiquity to the Early Modern Period (500-1500) which traces the main political, economic, social, religious and intellectual developments of the period.
3

HIST 365 Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Medieval Europe

Examinations of the three religions that most significantly impacted the Western world. Identifies the beliefs of each and traces their early histories. Emphasis on their interaction in the Medieval period (500-1500).
3

HIST 367 Topics in Early Modern Europe

A survey of the social, economic, religious and cultural developments in Western Europe from 1500 to 1800. Geographical emphasis may vary.
3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 6 credit hours

HIST 368 Tudor-Stuart England, 1485-1689

An investigation of the history of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland from 1485 to 1689, focusing on political, constitutional, social and cultural developments.
3

HIST 371 The European Enlightenment

Investigates the European Enlightenment in the 18th century and its contributions to Western modernity. Themes that will be treated include religion and science, race, gender, universal culture, the organization of political power and economics.
3

HIST 372 European Reformation: Religion & Society

Investigates religious developments in sixteenth-century Europe (Protestant and Catholic Reformations). Includes transformations in political power, gender relations, education, warfare and other areas that have shaped Western modernity.
3

HIST 373 France, Empire and War to 1804

France and its empire in the Americas, 1500-1804. Political and cultural development, French-indigenous relations, the First Global War (1756-63).
3

HIST 382 Hitler's Germany 1890-1945

The recent history of Germany focusing on the forces, events and individuals that gave rise to National Socialism and contributed to the decline of Europe into war and revolution.
3

HIST 383 Great War and Aftermath

An analysis of WWI from its origins through 1939, focusing on European participants and how the war led to a series of protracted crises that shaped the 20th century. Issues to be covered include communism, fascism, cultural modernism and gender.
3

HIST 384 Three Germanies

Focused on East and West Germany, examines the political, diplomatic, cultural and social effects of the ideological battle between East and West on Europe from 1945 through 1990.
3

HIST 385 History of the Holocaust, 1933 to the Present

An examination of the intellectual and racial antecedents of the Holocaust, its bureaucracy, operating mechanics for murder and the steps taken toward the final solution, the elimination of European Jewry.
3

HIST 386 Twentieth Century Russia

A detailed consideration of the establishment of the Soviet Union, its dissolution, and the contemporary role of Russia in the world.
3

HIST 388 Imperial Russia, 1700-1917

Examines political, economic and cultural changes in imperial Russia from Peter the Great to the fall of the Romanov dynasty in 1917.
3

HIST 389 Modern Europe

A consideration in depth of European historical development from 1815 to the present, focusing on political, diplomatic and economic matters.
3

Course Attribute

Variable Title Course

Repeatable Status

ST - Repeatable under different subtitles and course is repeatable with a maximum of 9 credit hours

HIST 391 Women, Men, and Gender in Pre-Modern Europe

This course focuses on the lives of elite and ordinary women and men during the early development of Europe. Students examine changing definitions of femininity and masculinity, women's agency and roles, and gender relations.
3

HIST 392 Sex and Gender in Modern Europe

Rewrites European history by placing women and gender relations at the center. Focuses on key episodes, including war, and examines women's agency and roles, the forces shaping their lives, gender relations, and masculinity.
3

HIST 394 European Intellectual History

A consideration in depth of selected topics in European intellectual history from the Enlightenment to the present.
3

HIST 395 Topics in History

Treats diverse topics in American, European, Asian, African, Latin American or World History at an advanced level. For History majors, the co